dates & notation (WAS Re: coding a data range) 
Author Message
 dates & notation (WAS Re: coding a data range)



 >  
 > > Be real. I've developed for OS/2 at IBM. I love OS/2, but it's dead.
 >
 > Checkout some of comp.os.os2.* and you'll see it's far from dead.  The
 > rumours keep flying and I wouldn't be a bit surprised if that isn't
 > encouraged by M$ but wasn't it Mark Twain who said, "The rumours of my
 > demise have been greatly exagerated."
 >
 > YMMV but I have only three apps that require me to boot Windoze and I
 > NEVER leave the phone jack connected when I do.
 >

Sorry, but... OS/2 IS dead.

IBM Withdrawal Announcement
http://www.*-*-*.com/ ;parms=H_902-274

and for conjecture as to WHY it has happened...

http://www.*-*-*.com/

But hey, I still run Amiga (OS3.9) and rumors of it's demise are somewhat
exagerated... 8-(

--



Sat, 11 Jun 2005 10:45:27 GMT  
 dates & notation (WAS Re: coding a data range)

Quote:

> Sorry, but... OS/2 IS dead.

> IBM Withdrawal Announcement
> http://www.ibmlink.ibm.com/usalets&parms=H_902-274

All that has been withdrawn is the sale of shrink wrapped copies of OS/2 Warp
4.0 and WSEB as they were originally introduced.  On current hardware they
cannot be installed without first modifying the installation disks and
subsequently applying several fix packs.  The only reason anyone buys them
anymore is to obtain a new OS/2 license.

IBM continues to sell new licenses for both Warp 4 and WSEB as well as media
packages and maintenance agreements for them through Passport Advantage.  The 10
license minimum for Passport Advantage has been reduced to 0.  Anyone can
register free of charge.  The details, including order numbers, are contained in
an announcement dated 2002/12/19 on the Software Choice web site

  http://www.ibm.com/software/os/warp/swchoice/



Sat, 11 Jun 2005 11:26:18 GMT  
 dates & notation (WAS Re: coding a data range)



 >  
 > >  > > Your format is [cc]yymmdd, thus cc=20, yy=02, mm=11, dd=29. Today is cc=21.
 > >  > > Did you intend to write [cc]yyyymmdd? If you hadn't written [cc] I would have
 > >  > > read that as year 2002, even though it violates the format.
 > >  > >
 > >  > So do you really want him to display 2101/12/05 for today?
 >  
 > > Yes, I'm serious. You think this is the 20th century?
 >
 > Perhaps but two litteral minded. :-)  I'm refering to the digits
 > represending the century not the century number (e.g. 20 not 21).  The

The distinction escapes me, but it is late. There was another response by a
defender that explained using in/on century, but I chose not to respond at
the time preferring to let it go. It seems it all hinges on the fact that there
was no year zero, and consequently no century zero? Century 20 plus 2 years,
is that the rationalization?

 > reason for doing this is to provide convenient defaults - note the
 > square brackets around cc.  Thus "date_default" will expand 21214 into

Yes, square brackets understood to be optional content.

 > 20021214.
 >
 > What would you call those two digits of a date?

Century minus 1?
Not to be difficult, but this all smacks of pedagogical hand waving to ignore
reality. IE it's convenient to refer to it as century, but inaccurate. Reality
is often inconvenient. Pi is sometimes referred to as 22/7, convenient but
inaccurate. (As an aside there was a state legislature that attempted to
legislate pi as = 22/7. Reality is inconvenient.)

Perhaps I'm being pedantic?

No, I'm not trying to troll. The intellectual level in this group is
significantly higher than most and for that I'm thankful. If you choose to
respond, I'll let it go at that.

--




Sat, 11 Jun 2005 13:41:10 GMT  
 dates & notation (WAS Re: coding a data range)
James,
Thank you for noting IBM's continuing support of OS/2.

OS/2 is also available through Serenity Systems' eComStation
        http://www.ecomstation.com/
Curtis



Thu, 16 Jun 2005 02:39:16 GMT  
 dates & notation (WAS Re: coding a data range)
Danny,
The routine at the site you cite,
http://www.*-*-*.com/
looks like an algorithm by Henry F. Fliegel and Thomas C. Van Flandern
in a letter to the editor of Communications of the ACM (CACM, volume 11,
number 10, October 1968, p.657).  I've shamelessly lifted the citation
from Peter Meyer's notes on "Julian and Gregorian Day Numbers" in
        http://www.*-*-*.com/

The first hit I got from giving "Fliegel van Flandern julian day number"
to Teoma is
        http://www.*-*-*.com/
which is also by Peter Meyer.  It has more description, but not the
detailed citation of the CACM letter.  

The Fliegel & Van Flandern algorithm has, indeed, been implemented in
one line in APL.  It can be found in TryAPL2's CALENDAR workspace.  

There's a little story here.

Howard J. Smith wrote an article (ca. 1987) for the APL Bay Area User
Group's newsletter proposing the addition of additional cycles beyond
the 4-, 100-, and 400-year cycles and provided a function that showed
them.  

Howard's functions are mostly quite concise!  This function may have had
a dozen lines.  Dick Conner decided to one-up Howard by writing a
function to give the Julian day number from year, month, and day in one
line.  Dick used the Fliegel and Van Flandern algorithm.  It's the JD
function in the CALENDAR workspace of TryAPL2.  (JD now has two lines.
But it started out as a single line!)  

I made heavy use of{*filter*}'s JD function in my work at IBM.  
Curtis Jones



Thu, 16 Jun 2005 07:19:27 GMT  
 Einstein's Riddle

Quote:

> Who would be interested in using his/her brain (and his computer) to solve
> the following?

> Steve Graham

> ===

> Einstein's Riddle

> Albert Einstein wrote this riddle this century [ed. 20th century].  He said
> 98% of the world could not solve it.

> There are 5 houses in 5 different colors.  In each house lives a person with
> a different nationality.  The 5
> owners drink a certain type of beverage, smoke a certain brand of cigar, and
> keep a certain pet.  No owners
> have the same pet, smoke the same brand of cigar or drink the same beverage.

> The question is: "Who owns the fish?"

> Hints:

> The Brit lives in the red house.

> The Sweed keeps dogs as pets.

> The Dane drinks tea.

> The green house is on the left of the white house.

> The green house's owner drinks coffee.

> The person who smokes Pall Mall rears birds.

> The owner of the yellow house smokes Dunhill.

> The man living in the center house drinks milk.

> The Norwegian lives in the first house.

> The man who smokes Blends lives next to the one who keeps cats.

> The man who keeps the horse lives next to the man who smokes Dunhill.

> The owner who smokes Bluemasters drinks beer.

> The German smokes Prince.

> The Norwegian lives next to the blue house.

> The man who smokes Blends has a neighbor who drinks water.

Using neural nets to catch fish?
God cries when you waste a pun....

Doc Alb



Mon, 08 Sep 2003 02:42:13 GMT  
 Character singleton constants

Quote:



> > I have recently "re-discovered" problems with scalars.

> > I have started using the ":SELECT" ":CASE"..":ELSE" ":END" control
> > structure in Dyalog and APL2000.

> > Because the structure uses a "MATCH" comparision, when used with a
> > singlton, the rank becomes critical.

> It does. But nothing a {first} cannot solve. And {first} (when compared to
> {ravel}) is a very cheap operation.
> --
>     Stef "WildHeart"

Yes, the solution is simple, but only after you realise there is a
problem, and in this case ";-)", you tend to get a wrong answer rather
than an "error message".
--
Ray Cannon
Computer Consultant

www.vector.org.uk


Sat, 04 May 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 touch typing (was Re: wanted IBM 5100)


Quote:



> >> > We've nattered and argued about keyboard layout but have not yet touched
> >> > (how appropriate!) on keyboard feel. On the PC side my favorites are the
> >> In my opinion, the best keyboard I have EVER used is the
> >> IBM Selectric typewriter keyboard.
> >> There is no computer keyboard available that I know of
> >> that has the same excellent tactile feedback that the
> >> Selectric possesses.
> >> If anyone knows of one, please let me know about it.

> >Of course the worst keyboards of all are the ones on laptops.

> Do I hear the voice of inexperience? Laptops have bad keyboards, but hardly the
> worst.

> The Sinclair 1000 wasn't a laptop, but its keyboard was worse than those on most
> $6 calculators. It didn't even have keys, just a sheet of plastic - sorta like
> the buttons on a credit-card-size calculator.

> The keyboards on pico-computers are worse than the ones on laptops, too; at
> least you can touch-type on a laptop instead of having to use a pen to press
> those itty-bitty buttons.

I'm sorry, I thought we were discussing PC (and Selectric) keyboards.
Also, I really wouldn't consider the Sinclair 1000 as having a keyboard,
seeing as there weren't any keys.


Thu, 30 Nov 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 touch typing (was Re: wanted IBM 5100)


Quote:

>> There is no computer keyboard available that I know of
>> that has the same excellent tactile feedback that the
>> Selectric possesses.

>> If anyone knows of one, please let me know about it.

>I agree fully with Bob that the all-time best keyboard was the IBM
>Selectric, and I am not aware of anything currently available that can
>match it. In my opinion the closest any keyboard has come has been the
>original IBM PC keyboard.

     I'd give it second place myself.  While I do like the feel of an
IBM Selectric and it certainly was the best commonly-used (in my neck
of the woods) one, I have to give first place to the keyboard on the
Olivetti ET121/221 (not sure about the letter prefix) memory
typewriter.  That one was a joy.  Give me a keyboard like that one for
my box and I'd be quite happy.

[snip]

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko

C Pronunciation Guide:
     y=x++;     "wye equals ex plus plus semicolon"
     x=x++;     "ex equals ex doublecross semicolon"



Fri, 01 Dec 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 touch typing (was Re: wanted IBM 5100)


: > On the Mac side I like the more expensive Apple Extended keyboard
: > over the Apple Design keyboard. Other opinions?

: It's worth pointing out that there have been two different models
: of the Apple Extended keyboard.  The original (with non-adjustable
: height and a key-like power key) has considerably clickier keys
: than the followup Extended II (with adjustable height and a power
: button instead of key), even though they both use Alps keyswitches.

The Extended II is still far, far better than the current AppleDesign
keyboards, though.  I've never used the original Extended, so I can't
compare it with the later model, but I have an Extended II and find
it pleasingly clicky.  Not all Extended IIs are the same in this
regard, though; I have two of them, and one is somewhat mushy.

--

   "I can't remember why I like this feeling when it always seems to let
                         me down." - Gin Blossoms
Cookie's Revenge: ftp://ftp.rmi.net/pub2/tph/cookie/cookies-revenge.sit.hqx



Fri, 01 Dec 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 touch typing (was Re: wanted IBM 5100)


: > On the Mac side I like the more expensive Apple Extended keyboard
: > over the Apple Design keyboard. Other opinions?

: It's worth pointing out that there have been two different models
: of the Apple Extended keyboard.  The original (with non-adjustable
: height and a key-like power key) has considerably clickier keys
: than the followup Extended II (with adjustable height and a power
: button instead of key), even though they both use Alps keyswitches.
: I still prefer the Apple IIgs keyboard to either of the Extended
: models, though.

Hmm, it appears that nobody has mentioned the original Mac/Mac Plus
keyboard.  The heaviest computer keyboard I have ever used, almost
but not quite as heavy as a manual typewriter.  I used to hate it
until I started to type in a huge chunk of text.  It bounced back
so much quicker than all the newer Macintosh keyboards that it was
very very fast to type with.  It still has the irritating rounded
keycaps which are rounded the wrong way, but it certainly could not
be described as mushy.  Not too pleasent unless you learnt to type
the "proper" way with your wrists in the air, so that the wrist action
is available for hammering the keyboard. Yes, I learnt to type on one
of those manual typewriters.

As for really bad keyboards... the best of the truely bad was the original
TRS-80 Color Computer keyboard---at least you got some feedback from it
(it was still pretty bad, much worse than even the mushiest modern keyboard...
too little travel, too uneven etc).  My commiserations to those who owned
the Atari 400 and had to type on them.

Cheers,

Kin Hoong



Sun, 03 Dec 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 touch typing (was Re: wanted IBM 5100)


Quote:


> : > On the Mac side I like the more expensive Apple Extended keyboard
> : > over the Apple Design keyboard. Other opinions?

> : It's worth pointing out that there have been two different models
> : of the Apple Extended keyboard.  The original (with non-adjustable
> : height and a key-like power key) has considerably clickier keys
> : than the followup Extended II (with adjustable height and a power
> : button instead of key), even though they both use Alps keyswitches.
> : I still prefer the Apple IIgs keyboard to either of the Extended
> : models, though.

> Hmm, it appears that nobody has mentioned the original Mac/Mac Plus
> keyboard.  The heaviest computer keyboard I have ever used, almost
> but not quite as heavy as a manual typewriter.  I used to hate it
> until I started to type in a huge chunk of text.  It bounced back
> so much quicker than all the newer Macintosh keyboards that it was
> very very fast to type with.  It still has the irritating rounded
> keycaps which are rounded the wrong way, but it certainly could not
> be described as mushy.  Not too pleasent unless you learnt to type
> the "proper" way with your wrists in the air, so that the wrist action
> is available for hammering the keyboard. Yes, I learnt to type on one
> of those manual typewriters.

> As for really bad keyboards... the best of the truely bad was the original
> TRS-80 Color Computer keyboard---at least you got some feedback from it
> (it was still pretty bad, much worse than even the mushiest modern keyboard...
> too little travel, too uneven etc).  My commiserations to those who owned
> the Atari 400 and had to type on them.

> Cheers,

> Kin Hoong

But you can't beat the Sinclair Spectrum (Timex in the US).  {*filter*}
keys, no space bar (a space key instead) and all BASIC commands encoded
onto a key press, eg. to load a program you'd just type 'J'.  How
efficient, how easy, how quickly your eyesight deteriorated squinting at
the fading commands printed on the case.

Or alternatively there was the BBC micro; with its system reset key
right where you'd expect the backspace key.

Where did they get their designers?

Be seeing you

B.A.L.T.Y.N.

<On message, up to speed and touching base>



Sun, 03 Dec 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 
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