Surely you "J"est... 
Author Message
 Surely you "J"est...

Consider the following J program:

echo =: (1!:2)&2

huh =: 3 : 0
f1 i. y.
0 0$''
)

f1 =: 3 : 0 " 0
echo 'f1 > f2 ',": i. 1+y.
f2 i. 1+y.
)

f2 =: 3 : 0 " 0
echo '  f2 ',": i. y.
)

If we call huh with 1, it does what we expect:

   huh 1
f1 > f2 0
  f2

but if we call it with 2 ....

   huh 2
f1 > f2 0
  f2
f1 > f2 0 1
  f2
  f2 0
  f2
  f2 0
f1 > f2 0
  f2
f1 > f2 0 1
  f2
  f2 0
  f2
  f2 0

!!!



Mon, 09 Apr 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Surely you "J"est...
The order of side effects produced by function arguments to operators
can not be guaranteed; functions are applied to cells in fortuitous order,
and may be applied multiple times to a cell.

J. Storrs Hall writes on Thursday, October 22:

Quote:
> Consider the following J program:

> echo =: (1!:2)&2

> huh =: 3 : 0
> f1 i. y.
> 0 0$''
> )

> f1 =: 3 : 0 " 0
> echo 'f1 > f2 ',": i. 1+y.
> f2 i. 1+y.
> )
> f2 =: 3 : 0 " 0
> echo '  f2 ',": i. y.
> )

> If we call huh with 1, it does what we expect:

>    huh 1
> f1 > f2 0
>   f2

> but if we call it with 2 ....

>    huh 2
> f1 > f2 0
>   f2
> f1 > f2 0 1
>   f2
>   f2 0
>   f2
>   f2 0
> f1 > f2 0
>   f2
> f1 > f2 0 1
>   f2
>   f2 0
>   f2
>   f2 0

> !!!



Mon, 09 Apr 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Surely you "J"est...

Quote:

> Consider the following J program:
> ...

Interesting example. What were you going for with the "0 in:
Quote:

> f1 =: 3 : 0 " 0



Mon, 09 Apr 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Surely you "J"est...

Quote:

> The order of side effects produced by function arguments to operators
> can not be guaranteed; functions are applied to cells in fortuitous
> order,
> and may be applied multiple times to a cell.

Applying a function once, when the result is going to be thrown away,
might
be an accident.  Applying it twice smacks of carelessness...
-j

ps -- if you don't care about side effects, there's a really good
optimization I
can tell you about for lines of code that don't contain an explicit
assignment...



Wed, 11 Apr 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Surely you "J"est...


Quote:

>> The order of side effects produced by function arguments to operators
>> can not be guaranteed; functions are applied to cells in fortuitous
>> order,
>> and may be applied multiple times to a cell.

>Applying a function once, when the result is going to be thrown away,
>might
>be an accident.  Applying it twice smacks of carelessness...

It's not carelessness, I think.  Multiple evaluation occurs when the
verb produces different shapes from the cells; as soon as the
interpreter realizes this it goes back and reruns the verb from
the beginning.  There may be other times I don't know about.

I still think the language should provide some cases where
multiple evaluation is guaranteed not to occur.  For example,
some verbs are defined ONLY in terms of their side-effects.
With the rule Roger gave, the execution of

  (1!:2) 'tata'

is defined as writing an undefined number of copies of the string to
the file.

Henry Rich



Wed, 11 Apr 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Surely you "J"est...
I wrote

Quote:
>Applying a function once, when the result is going to be thrown away,
>might be an accident.  Applying it twice smacks of carelessness...

Henry Rich (Seymour Glass) wrote

Quote:
>>It's not carelessness, I think.  Multiple evaluation occurs when the
>>verb produces different shapes from the cells; as soon as the
>>interpreter realizes this it goes back and reruns the verb from
>>the beginning.  There may be other times I don't know about.

One of the first optimizations that goes into Lisp compilers (and often
put into interpreters) is an evaluator flag saying whether an
expression's
value is needed.  Such a flag would have obviated the whole problem
(not to mention great wastes of time and space in some other cases).

It's another example of the schizophrenic nature of J -- I often get
the feeling that whoever designed scripts never talks to whoever
designed expressions.  Try typing
if. 0 do. 'no' else. 'yes' end.
into the interaction (*.jx) window...

Quote:
>I still think the language should provide some cases where
>multiple evaluation is guaranteed not to occur.

Hear, hear!!

(i.e. I agree entirely...)

--j



Thu, 12 Apr 2001 02:00:00 GMT  
 Surely you "J"est...
Henry Rich writes on Saturday, October 24:

Quote:
> With the rule Roger gave, the execution of

>   (1!:2) 'tata'

> is defined as writing an undefined number of copies of the string to
> the file.

Actually no.  This would be a valence error as the monadic form
of file write has an empty domain.

In the dyadic case, writing once or writing a number of times have
the same result and effect.



Fri, 13 Apr 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Surely you "J"est...


Quote:
>I wrote
>One of the first optimizations that goes into Lisp compilers (and often
>put into interpreters) is an evaluator flag saying whether an
>expression's
>value is needed.  Such a flag would have obviated the whole problem
>(not to mention great wastes of time and space in some other cases).

Roger's never talked to me about how it works, but I think there's more
to it than you have mentioned.  The verb result has to be put somewhere; a
reasonable design would be to evaluate the verb on one cell, see what
shape & type you get out, assume all cells are going to produce that
shape & type, allocate space for the entire result, and then evaluate
the rest of the cells.  This will be fastest in most cases.  If a cell's
result comes back with a surprise shape, you have to reallocate the
output area: a reasonable decision might be to restart the verb using
a routine that allocates each cell's result separately, rather than trying
to save the results already computed.

Quote:
>It's another example of the schizophrenic nature of J -- I often get
>the feeling that whoever designed scripts never talks to whoever
>designed expressions.  Try typing
>if. 0 do. 'no' else. 'yes' end.
>into the interaction (*.jx) window...

It's not a script/non-script thing: you can't type if. in a script either,
unless it's part of an explicit definition.

Henry Rich



Fri, 13 Apr 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Surely you "J"est...

Quote:

>Henry Rich writes on Saturday, October 24:

>> With the rule Roger gave, the execution of

>>   (1!:2) 'tata'

>> is defined as writing an undefined number of copies of the string to
>> the file.

>Actually no.  This would be a valence error as the monadic form
>of file write has an empty domain.

>In the dyadic case, writing once or writing a number of times have
>the same result and effect.

Yes, I typed hastily.  What I meant was

    'tata' 1!:3 <'undefinedfile'

which exhibits the problem, no?

Henry Rich



Fri, 13 Apr 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Surely you "J"est...

Quote:

>Roger's never talked to me about how [multiple evaluation of cells]
> works...

That was inaccurate and ungrateful.  Roger very helpfully told me long
ago that a problem I was having with reevaluation probably stemmed
from cells' returning different shapes.  The rest is my supposition.

Henry rich



Fri, 13 Apr 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 10 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. string.join(["Tk 4.2p2", "Python 1.4", "Win32", "free"], "for")

2. BEGIN{want[]={"s1o", "s2o", "s2q", "s3q"}

3. Parsing ""D""?

4. "Fifth", "Forth", zai nar?

5. Ruby "finalize", "__del__"

6. beginners "let"/"random" question

7. ANNOUNCE: new "plus"- and "dash"-patches available for Tcl7.5a2/Tk4.1a2

8. Looking for "stdin", "stdout"

9. Hi, this code: text0 = "One $BLAH Three" text1 = "One @BLAH Three" text0.sub!("$BLAH", "Two") text1.sub!("@BLAH", "Two") print text0,"\n" print text1,"\n" produces thiHi, this code: text0 = "One $BLAH Three" text1 = "One @BLAH Three" text0.sub!("$BLAH", "T

10. Match "ab" in "abc", but not in "abd"

11. replace string AFTER "size","initial", "next"

12. Lack of "D Tests", "E Tests", and "L Tests" for Generics

 

 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software