Can I learn 3 semesters of calculus by May? 
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 Can I learn 3 semesters of calculus by May?

Can I learn 3 Semesters of Calculus by May?

I have recently come to realize that my thinking  that placing out of my
math requirement meant that I  was numerate was a mistake.

I need to learn 3 semesters of college level calculus by May; ( for non
Americans,  here in the States, the third semester is traditionally a sort
of intro. differential equations course).

I used to know what a Taylor series was, (if fact I still remember what
one is, I just get kind a lost when I actually try to take one). As an old
APL programmer I suppose I have a cobbled together knowledge of matrix
algebra.

And I trade {*filter*} options, so over the course of the years I ve had to
read some fairly technical papers and code up, (in APL),  some tricky
stuff, (Quadratic optimization, GARCH processes, etc.).

And I d like to think that if I devote an hour an evening to this I d
accomplish at least as much  in one month as I accomplished  in a semester
of catching the subway up from SoHo, grabbing two hot dogs and an Orange
Julius, and stumbling around Columbia from class to class.

Surely there is some soft/courseware, (Mathamatica perhaps, or Derive?),
or a series of books, or maybe some books about the courseware, that can
enable me to accomplish this?

Any suggestions greatly appreciated

Regards
Tony
PS: since I m using America on Line I can t cross post to multiple news
groups, but have to do this cut and paste thing to each group; that also
means I can t check all groups for replies at once either. Might I ask
that should you reply, to please e-mail me in addition to posting to the
group. Thanks Again



Tue, 15 Jun 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 Can I learn 3 semesters of calculus by May?

: Can I learn 3 Semesters of Calculus by May?

Yes.  

Once took a 6 week course that was for incoming grad students in
economics.  I survived so it's possible.  The course covered the first
3 semesters, ending in partial derivatives.  But this was a long
time ago, so I can't say what books are best now.

Could you look over the current crop of textbooks and even computer
courses devoted to calculus and see which authors or approaches
suit your fancy?  Perhaps one very technical text, one funny one like
Pine's, and one computer-oriented text should cover the fields.

I can recall once taking a calulus course that was married to APL,
so maybe ask around, since, in that way, you tie two interests
together.  Chat with a kind math prof or two and they probably know
what might be helpful and even enjoyable so it's not a big deal.

Adam Sundor

PS  Thanks for your email.  There is a Japanese EMM for the HP200.
    I thought I'd mention it here but I'll try to email you also.  

: Surely there is some soft/courseware, (Mathamatica perhaps, or Derive?),
: or a series of books, or maybe some books about the courseware, that can
: enable me to accomplish this?

Again, yes.  Browse through a university or first-rate bookstore/computerware
place.  Ask around.  I've seen stuff that looks pretty good and maybe
even fun to do.  Talk to a math prof that is highly regarded as a
teacher to those who have to swim in calculus but are not
mathematicians.  Some profs specialize in this type of work.



Tue, 15 Jun 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 Can I learn 3 semesters of calculus by May?

: Can I learn 3 Semesters of Calculus by May?

: Surely there is some soft/courseware, (Mathamatica perhaps, or Derive?),
: or a series of books, or maybe some books about the courseware, that can
: enable me to accomplish this?

Take a look at "Calculus and Mathematica", by Davis, Porta, and Uhl,
published by Addison-Wesley.  This is delivered in the form of
Mathematica electronic "notebooks" (along with printed versions).

As I understand it, this is used at the University of Illinois and
Ohio State University in a laboratory setting with no or minimal
lecture classes -- and that suggests it would be quite suitable for
self-study.

The Davis/Porta/Uhl course is one of the "Calculus Reform" projects.
Although it covers all the essential topics of more traditional
calculus courses, so far as I can tell, it may differ somewhat in
emphasis.  It does put a lot of the stress upon learning visually and
upon conceptual understanding, as opposed to grinding away with
paper-and-pencil calculations.

You say that the third semester is traditionally a sort of
intro. differential equations course.  I don't think this is
universally true in the U.S.  Judging from the standard calculus books
with which I'm familiar, the third semester is, in fact, a
multivariable calculus/vector calculus course.  And that is what's
included as the last part of the Davis/Porta/Uhl materials.  Of
course, there are various topics from differential equations appearing
in several places (especially those related to vector fields), but, as
I recall, nothing approaching what one might find in a full semester
of ODEs.

--

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Sat, 19 Jun 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 3 post ] 

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