User's hardware info? 
Author Message
 User's hardware info?

win95 -> MSVC++ 6.0 -> sp1

Hi all
How can I get the disk serial number? Or other obtainable unique hardware
inf.?
I'm attempting to give my app it at least a form of basic license
protection.
Any assistance will be appreciated.
TIA
Steve
Please email me...



Wed, 08 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?
    This will only be effective agains copying the instaled app not the
setup disks
    Network card info is avaible through winsock api.
    Jacques


Quote:
>win95 -> MSVC++ 6.0 -> sp1

>Hi all
>How can I get the disk serial number? Or other obtainable unique hardware
>inf.?
>I'm attempting to give my app it at least a form of basic license
>protection.
>Any assistance will be appreciated.
>TIA
>Steve
>Please email me...




Wed, 08 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?
If you don't plan on selling a million copies, and only want a very basic
licence system, you can use GetTickCount to create something fairly unique
on user systems. GetTickCount being called at exactly the same time on two
different machines seems quite unlikely.
But you might absolutely want to check out the GUIDGEN example to generate a
globally unique ID.

Johan Rosengren
Responsable Informatique
PACTA S.A.



Wed, 08 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?

Quote:

> If you don't plan on selling a million copies, and only want a
> very basic licence system, you can use GetTickCount to create
> something fairly unique on user systems. GetTickCount being
> called at exactly the same time on two different machines seems
> quite unlikely.

> But you might absolutely want to check out the GUIDGEN example
> to generate a globally unique ID.

I think you're missing the point.  The idea is to discover some bit of info
about the *machine* that is unique, not to just make up some unique number.

You have to have something you can look at when the program starts up so you
can say "Is this the computer I was sold to run on or not?"



Wed, 08 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?


Quote:

>> If you don't plan on selling a million copies, and only want a
>> very basic licence system, you can use GetTickCount to create
>> something fairly unique on user systems. GetTickCount being
>> called at exactly the same time on two different machines seems
>> quite unlikely.

>> But you might absolutely want to check out the GUIDGEN example
>> to generate a globally unique ID.

>I think you're missing the point.  The idea is to discover some bit of
info
>about the *machine* that is unique, not to just make up some unique

number.

What's the difference?

You call CoCreateGuid() once and save the GUID in the machine's
registry.  Now, you've got your "bit of info about the machine that is
unique".

CoCreateGuid() is guaranteed to create a unique value regardless of
when or where its called or from what machine.

Quote:
>You have to have something you can look at when the program starts up
so you
>can say "Is this the computer I was sold to run on or not?"

And what's wrong with reading a GUID out of the registry?

Regards,

Matt Arnold
Professional Music Products
Mark of the Unicorn, Inc.
http://www.motu.com

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
////////////// Change "garbage" to "motu" to email me! //////////////
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Pursuant to US Code, Title 47, Chapter 5, Subchapter II, Sec. 227 any
and all unsolicited commercial email sent to this address is subject
to a download and archival fee in the amount of $500.00 US.  Emailing
this address denotes acceptance of these terms.  For more information



Wed, 08 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?
No, I'm not missing the point. You create the value when installing the app
(or on first startup), store it somewere safe, the registry or a small
licence file or whatever, when you move the app, you'll get one hell of a
surprise.

Johan Rosengren
Responsable Informatique
PACTA S.A.



Thu, 09 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?

Quote:

>No, I'm not missing the point. You create the value when installing
the app
>(or on first startup), store it somewere safe, the registry or a small
>licence file or whatever, when you move the app, you'll get one hell
of a
>surprise.

What do you mean by "move the app"?  If you had a GUID in the registry,
nothing would happen to it if the user moved the app's file around.

Or, do you mean move the app to a new computer?  Well -- obviously --
that would break *any* scheme reliant on something specific about the
old machine.  I mean, isn't this also a problem with the unique machine
info you've been after?  As soon as the user upgrades to a new computer
they get "one hell of a surprise" as well.  No?

I don't see what the real difference is between some unique "bit of
info" intrinsic to a machine (some combination of hardware serial
number(s), owner's name, machine's make and model, etc.) and one that
you *assign* the machine yourself (such as a simple GUID in the
registry).

Best regards,
Matt Arnold / Boston, USA
C++,Win32,WDM,VxD,Win16,MIDI / 7R7,A-Box,C&E,DM,e,H-Kah,OMD,PSB,RF

//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
///////////// Change "garbage" to "netcom" to e-mail me! /////////////
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

Pursuant to US Code, Title 47, Chapter 5, Subchapter II, Sec. 227 any
and all unsolicited commercial email sent to this address is subject
to a download and archival fee in the amount of $500.00 US.  Emailing
this address denotes acceptance of these terms.  For more information



Thu, 09 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?

Matt Arnold a crit dans le message

Quote:
>What do you mean by "move the app"?  If you had a GUID in the registry,
>nothing would happen to it if the user moved the app's file around.

Well, for a basic licence scheme, it would not seem a big problem if the
user moved his/her bought-and-paid for app to a different directory, so
obviously I mean moving it to a different machine.

Quote:

>Or, do you mean move the app to a new computer?  Well -- obviously --
>that would break *any* scheme reliant on something specific about the
>old machine.  I mean, isn't this also a problem with the unique machine
>info you've been after?  As soon as the user upgrades to a new computer
>they get "one hell of a surprise" as well.  No?

So this would not be a problem with hardware serial numbers then? As soon as
the user upgrades to a new machine, they will reinstall all ther legitimate
apps, no? Otherwise, they will be in for *many* surprises. If I upgraded, I
would either move the whole harddisk to the new can, in which case I would
have no problems, or reinstall my software on the new computer.

Quote:

>I don't see what the real difference is between some unique "bit of
>info" intrinsic to a machine (some combination of hardware serial
>number(s), owner's name, machine's make and model, etc.) and one that
>you *assign* the machine yourself (such as a simple GUID in the
>registry).

No, it's not. You might be missing the point? It's just that a software
generated scheme will work in all cases where the code works. Trying to find
some machine specific value, guaranteed to be unique globally, will be far
more difficult if you want to be really general. As Microsoft already
invented the wheel in this case, why reinventing?

Johan Rosengren
Responsable Informatique
PACTA S.A.



Thu, 09 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?
Hi and thanks for the input. Many different sides to this coin you all have
pointed out. My knowledge is very basic on this subject and I do appreciate
the all of your help.
Steve


Thu, 09 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?
I hate to {*filter*}in but correct me if I'm wrong. A GUID is based in part on
the NIC?

Mike


Quote:

> Matt Arnold a crit dans le message

> >What do you mean by "move the app"?  If you had a GUID in the registry,
> >nothing would happen to it if the user moved the app's file around.

> Well, for a basic licence scheme, it would not seem a big problem if the
> user moved his/her bought-and-paid for app to a different directory, so
> obviously I mean moving it to a different machine.

> >Or, do you mean move the app to a new computer?  Well -- obviously --
> >that would break *any* scheme reliant on something specific about the
> >old machine.  I mean, isn't this also a problem with the unique machine
> >info you've been after?  As soon as the user upgrades to a new computer
> >they get "one hell of a surprise" as well.  No?

> So this would not be a problem with hardware serial numbers then? As soon
as
> the user upgrades to a new machine, they will reinstall all ther
legitimate
> apps, no? Otherwise, they will be in for *many* surprises. If I upgraded,
I
> would either move the whole harddisk to the new can, in which case I would
> have no problems, or reinstall my software on the new computer.

> >I don't see what the real difference is between some unique "bit of
> >info" intrinsic to a machine (some combination of hardware serial
> >number(s), owner's name, machine's make and model, etc.) and one that
> >you *assign* the machine yourself (such as a simple GUID in the
> >registry).

> No, it's not. You might be missing the point? It's just that a software
> generated scheme will work in all cases where the code works. Trying to
find
> some machine specific value, guaranteed to be unique globally, will be far
> more difficult if you want to be really general. As Microsoft already
> invented the wheel in this case, why reinventing?

> Johan Rosengren
> Responsable Informatique
> PACTA S.A.



Sun, 12 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?
It generally is, but if the machine has no NIC, then some magic unique
number is used.

-- KDJ

Quote:

>I hate to {*filter*}in but correct me if I'm wrong. A GUID is based in part on
>the NIC?

>Mike



Sun, 12 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?
Mike!

Fell free to {*filter*}in!

The online help states that, but it can't be the whole truth - you must be
able to create OCXes on a non-networked machine!

But of course, as time goes and more and more people become computer users,
thing like user-names, time-as-expressed-as-milliseconds-since-some-event
etc. the risk for duplicates will increase for completely software-based
schemes to generate unique identifiers. But I'm quite sure MS thought long
and hard as regards generation of GUIDs...

Johan Rosengren
Responsable Informatique
PACTA S.A.

MD [MS MVP] a crit dans le message ...

Quote:
>I hate to {*filter*}in but correct me if I'm wrong. A GUID is based in part on
>the NIC?



Mon, 13 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 User's hardware info?
Well..., psuedo unique number.  I don't know the algorithm but it cannot be
guaranteed to be unique unless a NIC is present.
Quote:

>It generally is, but if the machine has no NIC, then some magic unique
>number is used.

>-- KDJ


>>I hate to {*filter*}in but correct me if I'm wrong. A GUID is based in part on
>>the NIC?

>>Mike



Mon, 13 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 13 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. User's hardware info?

2. User's hardware info?

3. Getting user's e-mail info

4. Getting info on hardware

5. Hardware info from a C program

6. Hardware info from a C program

7. Hardware info

8. collecting hardware info for security purposes

9. Graphics output / reading hardware info ?

10. ? Reading HARDWARE info

11. Program to gather microcomputer hardware info (not SI or Checkit)

12. How to find hardware info at run time?

 

 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software