Academic version 
Author Message
 Academic version

I am talking a class in C++ at a local college.  We were told to get a
copy of the Microsoft Visual C++ Professional Academic version if we
didn't already have a copy.

My questions are:

If I get this academic version, can it be "updated" with the standard
Microsoft patches?

Can I "upgrade" it as newer releases or versions come out?

Are there any differences between the academic version and the
Professional version that you can buy from the store?  (It is my
understanding that the academic version is the professional version at a
student price -- right??.)

Ron Fluegge



Sat, 04 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Academic version

Quote:
>I am talking a class in C++ at a local college.  We were told to get a
>copy of the Microsoft Visual C++ Professional Academic version if we
>didn't already have a copy.

>My questions are:

>If I get this academic version, can it be "updated" with the standard
>Microsoft patches?

Yes, you can (of course, they have not compiled a separate version of their
soft)

Quote:

>Can I "upgrade" it as newer releases or versions come out?

Yes, but not necessarily under a student license.  You need your student
crudentials every time you want to buy an academic license.

Quote:

>Are there any differences between the academic version and the
>Professional version that you can buy from the store?  (It is my
>understanding that the academic version is the professional version at a
>student price -- right??.)

Correct.  But you also have no documentation at all, you only get a license
paper and the Cd's.  Help over the internet (msdn.microsoft.com) is
available, even the registered areas.
Quote:

>Ron Fluegge

Kind regards,

Sven Aelterman.



Sat, 04 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Academic version


Quote:


> Correct.  But you also have no documentation at all, you only get a
license
> paper and the Cd's.  Help over the internet (msdn.microsoft.com) is
> available, even the registered areas.

You get no *paper* copies of the documentation.  Well, there is
a really simple install thingy, but it basically says stick the CD in
the reader and go.

You do get all the helps on the CD.  And if you absolutely
must have the paper copies of the docs, you can order
them. They are kind of pricey for a student. And there
are rather a lot of pages.  About a half metre of shelf.
Some computer bookstores will have at least some of
them available in stock.

The biggest difference with the academic versions
is that you are not supposed to use them in a commercial
situation.  You are only supposed to use them to learn.

--
Dan Evens
(Standard disclaimers etc. No spam please.)



Sat, 04 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Academic version
After the classes are over, are you supposed to uninstall the academic
version and purchase the straight Professional version if you want to
continue using it?

I wasn't sure if the ability to update and purchase upgrades for the
academic version was on the "honor system" or a part of the installed
components (like a file that marked it as an academic version so that it
couldn't be upgraded to version 6.x or 7, etc.).

I had purchased the Learning Edition of VB 5.0 and was able to update and
upgrade it (by purchasing the commercial version upgrades) to VB 5.0 and
6.0 without any problems, but this is the first time that I've dealt with
academic versions.

Ron Fluegge

Quote:

> The biggest difference with the academic versions
> is that you are not supposed to use them in a commercial
> situation.  You are only supposed to use them to learn.

> --
> Dan Evens
> (Standard disclaimers etc. No spam please.)




Sat, 04 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Academic version

Quote:

> After the classes are over, are you supposed to uninstall the academic
> version and purchase the straight Professional version if you want to
> continue using it?

No.  Once you legitimately purchase an academic priced package
you may use it for as long as you want, even if you cease to
be elligible to purchase it.  You can even sell it after some
period of time specified in the license agreement (I think it's
six months).

Quote:

> I wasn't sure if the ability to update and purchase upgrades for the
> academic version was on the "honor system" or a part of the installed
> components (like a file that marked it as an academic version so that it
> couldn't be upgraded to version 6.x or 7, etc.).

I don't think the software knows whether it was purchased under
academic pricing when it comes to upgrade purchases.

Quote:

> I had purchased the Learning Edition of VB 5.0 and was able to update and
> upgrade it (by purchasing the commercial version upgrades) to VB 5.0 and
> 6.0 without any problems, but this is the first time that I've dealt with
> academic versions.

Now you're confusing things.  Learning Edition is different than
Academic Pricing.  At least with VC++, the Learning Edition is
a stripped version of the package as opposed to a discount for
students.


Sat, 04 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Academic version
Sorry.

The only point I was trying to make was that I have only a little experience
with upgrading Microsoft products -- Visual Basic 5.0 Learning Edition.  I
initially started with the Learning Edition.  After going through it, I
purchased the VB 5.0 Professional Edition "Upgrade" and it installed just fine
over the Learning Edition.  The same with the VB 6.0 Professional Edition
"Upgrade" over the VB 5.0 version.

So it appeared that going from the Learning Editions to the upgrades appeared
to work fine for Visual Basic.

However, when I looked at the Visual C++ Professional Version 6.0
Competitive/Version Upgrade (part no. 048-00215) descriptions, there's no
mention of the Academic Version.  You can upgrade if you have:

Visual C++ Professional Edition 4.0 or later
Visual C++ Standard Edition 4.0 or later
Visual C++ Learning Edition 5.0 or later

and of all things

Borland C++ (apparently any version -- I wonder about my 3.1???  <G> )
Borland C++ Builder

But absolutely no mention of an "Academic" version.  That's the reason for the
confusion and what I needed to do if I wanted to upgrade after the classes were
over.

I'm glad to know that it's a full version of the Professional edition.

Thanks...

Ron Fluegge

Ron Natalie wrote

Quote:

> Now you're confusing things.  Learning Edition is different than
> Academic Pricing.  At least with VC++, the Learning Edition is
> a stripped version of the package as opposed to a discount for
> students.



Sat, 04 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Academic version
Ron

Quote:
> However, when I looked at the Visual C++ Professional Version 6.0
> Competitive/Version Upgrade (part no. 048-00215) descriptions, there's ents.

That's because there's no such thing as the Academic VERSION.
WHich is why I was confused by your question to start with.
The terms LEARNING EDITION and PROFESSIONAL EDITION refer
to different flavors of the product.  The term ACADEMIC PRICING
refers to the pricing structure.  ACADEMIC PRICING is available
for both the LEARNING and PROFESSIONAL editions ($49 and $99
respectively).

There is *NO* difference inside the box between the ACADEMIC
and standard pricing.



Sun, 05 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Academic version

Quote:
> Ron
> That's because there's no such thing as the Academic VERSION.
> WHich is why I was confused by your question to start with.
> The terms LEARNING EDITION and PROFESSIONAL EDITION refer
> to different flavors of the product.  The term ACADEMIC PRICING
> refers to the pricing structure.  ACADEMIC PRICING is available
> for both the LEARNING and PROFESSIONAL editions ($49 and $99
> respectively).

Actually, academic pricing is available for the enterprise edition, too (or at
least was last time I looked).

Quote:

> There is *NO* difference inside the box between the ACADEMIC
> and standard pricing.

Correct. I believe there are some things concerning the license though.

--
Tomas Restrepo

http://members.xoom.com/trestrep/



Sun, 05 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Academic version
As I understand, the academic version gives you all of the rights of regular
versions.

--
Ed Fultz
CGI
Andover, Ma

Quote:

>After the classes are over, are you supposed to uninstall the academic
>version and purchase the straight Professional version if you want to
>continue using it?

>I wasn't sure if the ability to update and purchase upgrades for the
>academic version was on the "honor system" or a part of the installed
>components (like a file that marked it as an academic version so that it
>couldn't be upgraded to version 6.x or 7, etc.).

>I had purchased the Learning Edition of VB 5.0 and was able to update and
>upgrade it (by purchasing the commercial version upgrades) to VB 5.0 and
>6.0 without any problems, but this is the first time that I've dealt with
>academic versions.

>Ron Fluegge


>> The biggest difference with the academic versions
>> is that you are not supposed to use them in a commercial
>> situation.  You are only supposed to use them to learn.

>> --
>> Dan Evens
>> (Standard disclaimers etc. No spam please.)




Tue, 28 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Academic version

Quote:
> As I understand, the academic version gives you all of the rights of
regular
> versions.

It does appear that you are allowed to redistribute software written with
the Academic version of the product. The details are at:

http://www.microsoft.com/education/pricing/priceFAQ.htm#item8

// -------------------------------------------------------------------------
// andrew brown

// -------------------------------------------------------------------------



Tue, 28 Aug 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 10 post ] 

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