Refresher books for intermediate to advanced C++ devs? 
Author Message
 Refresher books for intermediate to advanced C++ devs?

Care to recommend books for a solid C/C++ dev (stuck on maintenance work on
Unix C/C++ apps for a while) to catch up on all the stuff that has happened
with C++ in the last 5-8 years pls?   ;-)

We do Windows dev only so a book that delved into ATL/MFC etc in addition
would be cool too. Ideally this guy would be able to read the book and/or
use it as a reference when he needed to do something quickly.

Kunle



Fri, 30 Jul 2004 20:52:57 GMT  
 Refresher books for intermediate to advanced C++ devs?
The indispensible C++ library (none of these are Windows books - just C++):

Scott Meyers: Effective C++ 2nd Ed., More Effective C++, Effective STL
Herb Sutter: Exceptional C++, More Exceptional C++
Bjarne Strustrup: The C++ Programming Language, 3rd Ed.
Nicolai Josuttis: The C++ Standard Library
Angelika Langer & Klaus Kreft: Standard C++ IOStreams and Locales
Andrei Alexandrescu: Modern C++ Design



Quote:
> Care to recommend books for a solid C/C++ dev (stuck on maintenance work
on
> Unix C/C++ apps for a while) to catch up on all the stuff that has
happened
> with C++ in the last 5-8 years pls?   ;-)

> We do Windows dev only so a book that delved into ATL/MFC etc in addition
> would be cool too. Ideally this guy would be able to read the book and/or
> use it as a reference when he needed to do something quickly.

> Kunle



Fri, 30 Jul 2004 22:27:03 GMT  
 Refresher books for intermediate to advanced C++ devs?
I would also like to sugegst that if you want to move into windows
programming, try to catch up on the latest and upcoming trend using Windows
Forms. you might want to ask others about further opinion on this



Quote:
> Care to recommend books for a solid C/C++ dev (stuck on maintenance work
on
> Unix C/C++ apps for a while) to catch up on all the stuff that has
happened
> with C++ in the last 5-8 years pls?   ;-)

> We do Windows dev only so a book that delved into ATL/MFC etc in addition
> would be cool too. Ideally this guy would be able to read the book and/or
> use it as a reference when he needed to do something quickly.

> Kunle



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 02:57:16 GMT  
 Refresher books for intermediate to advanced C++ devs?
If you need COM:
"Inside COM" by Dale Rogerson, MS Press
"Essential COM" by Don Box, Addison Wesley
"Effective COM" by Don Box et al, Addison Wesley
"Essential IDL" by Martin Gudgin, Addison Wesley

For your ATL course:
"Professional ATL COM Programming" by Dr Richard Grimes, Wrox Press
"ATL Internals" by Brent Rector and Chris Sells, Addison Wesley

--
=====================================
Alexander Nickolov
Microsoft MVP [VC], MCSD

MVP VC FAQ: http://www.mvps.org/vcfaq
=====================================


Quote:
> Care to recommend books for a solid C/C++ dev (stuck on maintenance work on
> Unix C/C++ apps for a while) to catch up on all the stuff that has happened
> with C++ in the last 5-8 years pls?   ;-)

> We do Windows dev only so a book that delved into ATL/MFC etc in addition
> would be cool too. Ideally this guy would be able to read the book and/or
> use it as a reference when he needed to do something quickly.

> Kunle



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 04:58:31 GMT  
 Refresher books for intermediate to advanced C++ devs?
Well, we have the ANSI C++ meeting ahead for new standards to be adopted. Just wait for month or two I sure there will be lots of books about it.

As for windows, don't read anything about MFC/ATL since MS is killing it with .NET. Actually it is providing a useless .NETized MFC7 which is a cross between MCF4.2 and .NET with
which you wont be confortable.

You can read a lot about .NET, but you will be unhappy to see that how C# biased over C++ and that there is NO MORE MACHINE CODE generated from C++ compiler, C++ is now
INTERPRETED like basic.

So, I think you better stick to your old bjorne book.

Agron

Quote:

> Care to recommend books for a solid C/C++ dev (stuck on maintenance work on
> Unix C/C++ apps for a while) to catch up on all the stuff that has happened
> with C++ in the last 5-8 years pls?   ;-)

> We do Windows dev only so a book that delved into ATL/MFC etc in addition
> would be cool too. Ideally this guy would be able to read the book and/or
> use it as a reference when he needed to do something quickly.

> Kunle



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 06:39:33 GMT  
 Refresher books for intermediate to advanced C++ devs?
Hi,

A new C++ standard is at least several years away according to the rules for
ANSI/ISO standards.

MFC 7.0 is an extension of MFC with lots of new features and a restructured
code base to integrate it much better with ATL. If you mean the CLR and
managed code when you say .NET in this context, then that is not true since
MFC does not have a dependency on the CLR or managed code.

And of course you are wrong saying that C# is interpreted like basic. In
fact neither VB 6.0 (which used the same code generator as VC 6.0) not VB
7.0 or C# are interpreted. VB 6 was when debugging in the IDE.

Ronald Laeremans
Visual C++ compiler team


Quote:
> Well, we have the ANSI C++ meeting ahead for new standards to be adopted.

Just wait for month or two I sure there will be lots of books about it.
Quote:

> As for windows, don't read anything about MFC/ATL since MS is killing it

with .NET. Actually it is providing a useless .NETized MFC7 which is a cross
between MCF4.2 and .NET with
Quote:
> which you wont be confortable.

> You can read a lot about .NET, but you will be unhappy to see that how C#

biased over C++ and that there is NO MORE MACHINE CODE generated from C++
compiler, C++ is now
Quote:
> INTERPRETED like basic.

> So, I think you better stick to your old bjorne book.

> Agron

> On Mon, 11 Feb 2002 12:52:57 -0000, "Kunle Odutola"

> > Care to recommend books for a solid C/C++ dev (stuck on maintenance work
on
> > Unix C/C++ apps for a while) to catch up on all the stuff that has
happened
> > with C++ in the last 5-8 years pls?   ;-)

> > We do Windows dev only so a book that delved into ATL/MFC etc in
addition
> > would be cool too. Ideally this guy would be able to read the book
and/or
> > use it as a reference when he needed to do something quickly.

> > Kunle



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 07:03:37 GMT  
 Refresher books for intermediate to advanced C++ devs?


Quote:
> Well, we have the ANSI C++ meeting ahead for new standards to be adopted.

Just wait for month or two I sure there will be lots of books about it.
Quote:

> As for windows, don't read anything about MFC/ATL since MS is killing it

with .NET. Actually it is providing a useless .NETized MFC7 which is a cross
between MCF4.2 and .NET with

Quote:
> which you wont be confortable.

MFC/ATL are distinct and separate from .NET framework (Windows Forms). In
fact managed C++ is similarly distinct from unmanaged C++.

Quote:
> You can read a lot about .NET, but you will be unhappy to see that how C#

biased over C++ and that there is NO MORE MACHINE CODE generated from C++
compiler, C++ is now

Quote:
> INTERPRETED like basic.

IL is never interpreted [unless you use the interpreter (duh!) from the mono
project]. Don't understand what you mean by "C# biased over C++"

Quote:
> So, I think you better stick to your old bjorne book.

Nope. He needs the latest version of that in any case  ;-)

Kunle



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 09:21:10 GMT  
 Refresher books for intermediate to advanced C++ devs?
For a rock-solid C++ book that doesn't waste your time explaining a
"while"-loop, have a look into Bruce Eckel's "Thinking in C++". You can even
download it for free and print it for yourself. Note you're into >> 1000
pages, or your can purchase a copy in the book shops (probably outdated,
compared to the online version at http://www.mindview.net/Books)

Bernd


If you need COM:
"Inside COM" by Dale Rogerson, MS Press
"Essential COM" by Don Box, Addison Wesley
"Effective COM" by Don Box et al, Addison Wesley
"Essential IDL" by Martin Gudgin, Addison Wesley

For your ATL course:
"Professional ATL COM Programming" by Dr Richard Grimes, Wrox Press
"ATL Internals" by Brent Rector and Chris Sells, Addison Wesley

--
=====================================
Alexander Nickolov
Microsoft MVP [VC], MCSD

MVP VC FAQ: http://www.mvps.org/vcfaq
=====================================



Quote:
> Care to recommend books for a solid C/C++ dev (stuck on maintenance work
on
> Unix C/C++ apps for a while) to catch up on all the stuff that has
happened
> with C++ in the last 5-8 years pls?   ;-)

> We do Windows dev only so a book that delved into ATL/MFC etc in addition
> would be cool too. Ideally this guy would be able to read the book and/or
> use it as a reference when he needed to do something quickly.

> Kunle



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 15:47:32 GMT  
 Refresher books for intermediate to advanced C++ devs?

Quote:
> Well, we have the ANSI C++ meeting ahead for new standards to be adopted.

Just wait for month or two I sure there will be lots of books about it.

    The C++ Standardization meets every six month (and will be meeting again
in April), but that doesn't mean a new Standard is coming anytime soon.  ISO
rules require a Standard to remain stable for at least 5 years before
changes can be made.  That means 2003 at the *earliest*.  It was only at the
last meeting (October 2001), were any addition to the Standard even
considered, and those were merely new classes for the library.   Even after
changes are voted into the new draft standard, there will still need to be
two rounds of public commentaries.  That's another two years right there.

--
Truth,
James Curran
www.NJTheater.com     (Professional)
www.NovelTheory.com  (Personal)



Mon, 02 Aug 2004 22:44:46 GMT  
 Refresher books for intermediate to advanced C++ devs?

Quote:



>> Well, we have the ANSI C++ meeting ahead for new standards to be adopted.
>Just wait for month or two I sure there will be lots of books about it.

>    The C++ Standardization meets every six month (and will be meeting again
>in April), but that doesn't mean a new Standard is coming anytime soon.  ISO
>rules require a Standard to remain stable for at least 5 years before
>changes can be made.

Actually, the 5-year rule is not a {*filter*}e, but in any event,
is the one C++ is going with.

Quote:
>That means 2003 at the *earliest*.

Right, the committe has remained hard at work on other things,
and as James says 2003 will only be the _start_ of it.

Quote:
>It was only at the
>last meeting (October 2001), were any addition to the Standard even
>considered, and those were merely new classes for the library.

Right, and that's informal.

Quote:
>Even after
>changes are voted into the new draft standard, there will still need to be
>two rounds of public commentaries.  That's another two years right there.

Indeed, it'll take a few years.

The good news is that the committee is partaking in a Technical
Report in reference to C++ librararies, and that will probably
be a basis for what things _might_ be in C++0x.
--
Greg Comeau  GA BETA:4+ New Windows Backends  PLUS 'export' beta online!
Comeau C/C++ ONLINE ==>     http://www.*-*-*.com/
World Class Compilers:  Breathtaking C++, Amazing C99, Fabulous C90.
Comeau C/C++ with Dinkumware's Libraries... Have you tried it?



Mon, 02 Aug 2004 23:32:17 GMT  
 
 [ 10 post ] 

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