Learning Visual Basic 
Author Message
 Learning Visual Basic

Hi Folks,

I am wanting to learn VB.
I currently have a legal CD of Visual Basic 6.0 Professional Edition,
Development System, circa 1998.

Is this version still relevant now in 2009 or should I be looking at a later
version?
At this time I am not interested in WEB development of any sort.  Just
straight VB to compliment my extensive use of Excel's VBA
--
Regards
John Howard
Sydney, Australia



Fri, 20 Jan 2012 15:06:01 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic

Quote:
> I am wanting to learn VB. I currently have a legal CD of
> Visual Basic 6.0 Professional Edition, Development
> System, circa 1998.
> Is this version still relevant now in 2009 . . .

Hi Bill (oops, sorry, John. I thought you were someone else for a minute).
It is still relevant insofar as you can still write extremely useful
programs with it and those programs will still work on all current versions
of Windows, including Vista and the forthcoming Windows 7, but it has been
discontinued by Micro$oft and there is no guarantee that your programs will
continue to work after Windows 7, although they are quite likely to.

Quote:
> or should I be looking at a later version?

There is no later version. The last and final version of Visual Basic is the
version you already have (VB6). The other newer RAD tools produced by
Micro$oft (VB.Net for example) are completely different and the name "VB" or
"Visual Basic" in their titles is a marketing lie. For a VB6 (or in your
case Excel VBA) programmer the move to any version of the new Micro$oft .net
languages is no easier than the move to anything else, so if you do want to
move on from VBA or VB6 then your choices are almost unlimited and you might
do well avoiding Micro$oft products altogether and looking at other things,
such as Delphi for example.

Mike



Fri, 20 Jan 2012 16:13:09 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic


Quote:
> Hi Folks,

> I am wanting to learn VB.
> I currently have a legal CD of Visual Basic 6.0 Professional Edition,
> Development System, circa 1998.

> Is this version still relevant now in 2009 or should I be looking at a
later
> version?
> At this time I am not interested in WEB development of any sort.  Just
> straight VB to compliment my extensive use of Excel's VBA
> --

You will also need to download a Service Pack (all SP were cummulative).
"Service Pack 6 for Visual Basic 6.0"
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=9EF9BF70-DFE...
and likely the
"Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0 Common Controls" update
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=25437D98-51D...

-ralph



Fri, 20 Jan 2012 21:22:55 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic
John,

Visual Basic is a very living program language, despite what "some" persons
in this newsgroup write.

The newest version will be language version 10 also named 2010. It has still
all elements of Visual Basic like in version 1.

However, VB6 was based on Com objects while the later versions on .Net and
Object Oriented Programming.

The latest two versions have more for Office (Applications) then VB6, but it
does not make it easier for you to program in as you are used to VBA.

VB '98 (6) has much more elements from VBA then VB '10 (10)

In this newsgroup there is by some persons very much ostrich behaviour, so
this will become a trolling thread again.
Don't look at it, I will not reply on it either.

I wont give you more hints, simply search for another place to find advices
about the future of the Visual Basic Language.

Success

Cor


Quote:
> Hi Folks,

> I am wanting to learn VB.
> I currently have a legal CD of Visual Basic 6.0 Professional Edition,
> Development System, circa 1998.

> Is this version still relevant now in 2009 or should I be looking at a
> later
> version?
> At this time I am not interested in WEB development of any sort.  Just
> straight VB to compliment my extensive use of Excel's VBA
> --
> Regards
> John Howard
> Sydney, Australia



Sat, 21 Jan 2012 01:51:37 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic
Troll alert.

--
2025
If you do not believe in time travel,
your beliefs are about to be tempered.

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=43606237254

| John,
|
| Visual Basic is a very living program language, despite what "some"
persons
| in this newsgroup write.
|
| The newest version will be language version 10 also named 2010. It has
still
| all elements of Visual Basic like in version 1.
|
| However, VB6 was based on Com objects while the later versions on .Net and
| Object Oriented Programming.
|
| The latest two versions have more for Office (Applications) then VB6, but
it
| does not make it easier for you to program in as you are used to VBA.
|
| VB '98 (6) has much more elements from VBA then VB '10 (10)
|
| In this newsgroup there is by some persons very much ostrich behaviour, so
| this will become a trolling thread again.
| Don't look at it, I will not reply on it either.
|
| I wont give you more hints, simply search for another place to find
advices
| about the future of the Visual Basic Language.
|
| Success
|
| Cor
|
|
|
|
|


| > Hi Folks,
| >
| > I am wanting to learn VB.
| > I currently have a legal CD of Visual Basic 6.0 Professional Edition,
| > Development System, circa 1998.
| >
| > Is this version still relevant now in 2009 or should I be looking at a
| > later
| > version?
| > At this time I am not interested in WEB development of any sort.  Just
| > straight VB to compliment my extensive use of Excel's VBA
| > --
| > Regards
| > John Howard
| > Sydney, Australia
|



Sat, 21 Jan 2012 02:10:56 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic

Quote:
> The newest version will be language version 10 also
> named 2010. It has still all elements of Visual Basic
> like in version 1.

Liar.


Sat, 21 Jan 2012 02:17:18 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic
(Top-posting fixed)

Quote:
>> Hi Folks,

>> I am wanting to learn VB.
>> I currently have a legal CD of Visual Basic 6.0 Professional Edition,
>> Development System, circa 1998.

>> Is this version still relevant now in 2009 or should I be looking at
>> a later
>> version?
>> At this time I am not interested in WEB development of any sort.
>> Just straight VB to compliment my extensive use of Excel's VBA
>> --
> John,

> Visual Basic is a very living program language, despite what "some"
> persons in this newsgroup write.

> The newest version will be language version 10 also named 2010. It has
> still all elements of Visual Basic like in version 1.

It does not.

It does not have 1) the GoSub command......nor Control Arrays.



Sat, 21 Jan 2012 03:08:32 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic

Quote:

> I am wanting to learn VB.
> I currently have a legal CD of Visual Basic 6.0 Professional Edition,
> Development System, circa 1998.

Whatever you do, hang on to it.  The price is only appreciating on it.

VB6 is the '66 Mustang of programming languages.

Quote:
> Is this version still relevant now in 2009 or should I be looking at a later
> version?
> At this time I am not interested in WEB development of any sort.  Just
> straight VB to compliment my extensive use of Excel's VBA

If you know and use VBA, and you want to extend VBAs utility, there is *nothing*
that will facilitate this moreso than VB6!
--
.NET: It's About Trust!
 http://vfred.mvps.org


Sat, 21 Jan 2012 04:06:56 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic
Oh, gonna get shit for this,,, but here is what I think right now:

Go for the language that is best suited for the problem AND the
environment, use fortran 77 (dont reccoment it) if is wiedley used in
that system, VB6 if thats the pick of the crowd or whatever (LISP,
COBOL, FORTH, ADA, memnonics,PEARL,PHP,JAVA,Pascal,ML,Progress, Delphi
and so on), I code in C#, VB6, C (not C++), VB.NET and if I have to in
fortran77/90 but not metafortran (bleah) and for some easy apps in DCL
(like BAT files in dos but in openVMS).

Wanna feel how the help system should work, then I think u should test
an VB4, then u didnt get a lot of  - without filtering and adjusting
the help - The good old days, pressing F1 now is.... *horror* (well me
running enterprise version anyways)

Prototyping in VB4-6 is almost heavenly, look and feel goes right
trough to the end user with no effort... but maybe becaus ive been on
it from ver 2 (missed ver 1)

.NOT isnt bad (and its not VB), but is not as intuative for me... well
getting old... started with basic on a Commodore VIC20 and then Z80
machinecode... CP/M was a lift, catalogs (users) wow...

Feel what U like and go from there, but look around, learning
"fj?lnir" isnt a productive way to go, eaven if the compiler is
free ;)

Thats my 2 cents

//CY



Sat, 21 Jan 2012 05:33:03 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic
Hi John,

As you pointed out, VB6 is from 1998.  There's been bug fixes since then,
but no enhancements to it.  VB 6 was designed as a RAD development tool for
Windows: in this case designed for Windows 95, 98 and NT.  As far as modern
Windows development goes it is very dated. VB6 does not support 64 bit, has
only limited support for Unicode and threading. It doesn't support modern
programming concepts such as implementation inheritance. Even simple
concepts such as subclassing a window's wndProc become very convoluted in
VB6. But despite those many short comings, VB6 was arguably the best RAD
development tool in it's time back in 1998, so for a lot of people there is
a lot of nostalgia attached to it.

The modern version of VB, currently VB9 (Visual Studio 2008), or the in beta
version of VB10, Visual Studio 2010, provides all the power tools a
developer could ask for.  If you were to compare VB6 to VB9 in terms of
garage workshops, VB6 is much like the simple backyard workshop with a
limited set of tools.  From time to time you'll often see people driving
screws with a hammer saying it works. VB9 is more like the professional
workshop where you can pretty much always find the right tool for the job
every time.  The difficulty some folks face is they get over whelmed by the
options available.

My suggestion to you would be to grab the free version of VB9 (Visual Basic
Express 2008) and spend some time learning it.  Give it 3 or 6 months. Then
you'll probably want to do your office development using VSTO. There's some
really nice enhancements coming there in VS 2010.

As far as VBA goes, it was close to being the same as VB6.   You may find
learning VB6 easier, but learning VB .NEt (VB9 or later) will be far more
rewarding in terms of what you can do.


Quote:
> Hi Folks,

> I am wanting to learn VB.
> I currently have a legal CD of Visual Basic 6.0 Professional Edition,
> Development System, circa 1998.

> Is this version still relevant now in 2009 or should I be looking at a
> later
> version?
> At this time I am not interested in WEB development of any sort.  Just
> straight VB to compliment my extensive use of Excel's VBA
> --
> Regards
> John Howard
> Sydney, Australia



Sat, 21 Jan 2012 09:07:10 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic
To the OP:  Pay no attention to this douche.  He's a MSFT stooge who just
comes here to confuse the issue.  Plus he has a bad habit of stealing
trademarks that belong to other people and using them in his postings, which
makes him a stalker and a thief.  Not anyone I would trust.

--
2025
If you do not believe in time travel,
your beliefs are about to be tempered.

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=43606237254


| Hi John,
|
| As you pointed out, VB6 is from 1998.  There's been bug fixes since then,
| but no enhancements to it.  VB 6 was designed as a RAD development tool
for
| Windows: in this case designed for Windows 95, 98 and NT.  As far as
modern
| Windows development goes it is very dated. VB6 does not support 64 bit,
has
| only limited support for Unicode and threading. It doesn't support modern
| programming concepts such as implementation inheritance. Even simple
| concepts such as subclassing a window's wndProc become very convoluted in
| VB6. But despite those many short comings, VB6 was arguably the best RAD
| development tool in it's time back in 1998, so for a lot of people there
is
| a lot of nostalgia attached to it.
|
| The modern version of VB, currently VB9 (Visual Studio 2008), or the in
beta
| version of VB10, Visual Studio 2010, provides all the power tools a
| developer could ask for.  If you were to compare VB6 to VB9 in terms of
| garage workshops, VB6 is much like the simple backyard workshop with a
| limited set of tools.  From time to time you'll often see people driving
| screws with a hammer saying it works. VB9 is more like the professional
| workshop where you can pretty much always find the right tool for the job
| every time.  The difficulty some folks face is they get over whelmed by
the
| options available.
|
| My suggestion to you would be to grab the free version of VB9 (Visual
Basic
| Express 2008) and spend some time learning it.  Give it 3 or 6 months.
Then
| you'll probably want to do your office development using VSTO. There's
some
| really nice enhancements coming there in VS 2010.
|
| As far as VBA goes, it was close to being the same as VB6.   You may find
| learning VB6 easier, but learning VB .NEt (VB9 or later) will be far more
| rewarding in terms of what you can do.
|
|
|


| > Hi Folks,
| >
| > I am wanting to learn VB.
| > I currently have a legal CD of Visual Basic 6.0 Professional Edition,
| > Development System, circa 1998.
| >
| > Is this version still relevant now in 2009 or should I be looking at a
| > later
| > version?
| > At this time I am not interested in WEB development of any sort.  Just
| > straight VB to compliment my extensive use of Excel's VBA
| > --
| > Regards
| > John Howard
| > Sydney, Australia
|



Sat, 21 Jan 2012 10:00:43 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic
<snipped>
"... so for a lot of people there is a lot of nostalgia attached to it
[VB6]."
<snipped>

And money!



Sat, 21 Jan 2012 23:16:40 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic

Took this off Raymond Chen's web log:

Quote:
>> After all, if everything you wanted a program to do already existed
>> ready-made, it wouldn't be called programming any more. It would be
>> called shopping. <<

Fits .Nxt to a tee.  <g>

--
2025
If you do not believe in time travel,
your beliefs are about to be tempered.

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=43606237254


| Hi John,
|
| As you pointed out, VB6 is from 1998.  There's been bug fixes since then,
| but no enhancements to it.  VB 6 was designed as a RAD development tool
for
| Windows: in this case designed for Windows 95, 98 and NT.  As far as
modern
| Windows development goes it is very dated. VB6 does not support 64 bit,
has
| only limited support for Unicode and threading. It doesn't support modern
| programming concepts such as implementation inheritance. Even simple
| concepts such as subclassing a window's wndProc become very convoluted in
| VB6. But despite those many short comings, VB6 was arguably the best RAD
| development tool in it's time back in 1998, so for a lot of people there
is
| a lot of nostalgia attached to it.
|
| The modern version of VB, currently VB9 (Visual Studio 2008), or the in
beta
| version of VB10, Visual Studio 2010, provides all the power tools a
| developer could ask for.  If you were to compare VB6 to VB9 in terms of
| garage workshops, VB6 is much like the simple backyard workshop with a
| limited set of tools.  From time to time you'll often see people driving
| screws with a hammer saying it works. VB9 is more like the professional
| workshop where you can pretty much always find the right tool for the job
| every time.  The difficulty some folks face is they get over whelmed by
the
| options available.
|
| My suggestion to you would be to grab the free version of VB9 (Visual
Basic
| Express 2008) and spend some time learning it.  Give it 3 or 6 months.
Then
| you'll probably want to do your office development using VSTO. There's
some
| really nice enhancements coming there in VS 2010.
|
| As far as VBA goes, it was close to being the same as VB6.   You may find
| learning VB6 easier, but learning VB .NEt (VB9 or later) will be far more
| rewarding in terms of what you can do.
|
|
|


| > Hi Folks,
| >
| > I am wanting to learn VB.
| > I currently have a legal CD of Visual Basic 6.0 Professional Edition,
| > Development System, circa 1998.
| >
| > Is this version still relevant now in 2009 or should I be looking at a
| > later
| > version?
| > At this time I am not interested in WEB development of any sort.  Just
| > straight VB to compliment my extensive use of Excel's VBA
| > --
| > Regards
| > John Howard
| > Sydney, Australia
|



Sun, 22 Jan 2012 04:29:49 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic

Quote:
> Took this off Raymond Chen's web log:

>>> After all, if everything you wanted a program to do already existed
>>> ready-made, it wouldn't be called programming any more. It would be
>>> called shopping. <<

> Fits .Nxt to a tee.  <g>

Not even close...  

--
Tom Shelton



Sun, 22 Jan 2012 04:36:10 GMT  
 Learning Visual Basic


| On 2009-08-04, Kevin Provance <Bill.McCarthy.Is.Stalking.TPASoft.com>

| > Took this off Raymond Chen's web log:
| >
| >>> After all, if everything you wanted a program to do already existed
| >>> ready-made, it wouldn't be called programming any more. It would be
| >>> called shopping. <<
| >
| > Fits .Nxt to a tee.  <g>
| >
|
| Not even close...

Unfortunately, opinions from one of the Three MSFT Stoogeneers don't carry
much weight.

And...you're wrong.



Sun, 22 Jan 2012 04:51:45 GMT  
 
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