The BIG Picture (VB vs the OS) 
Author Message
 The BIG Picture (VB vs the OS)

When programming (in VB or any other language), the BIG picture of how
things fits together with the OS tends to get lost.

The capabilities of what the OS can do (e.g. Scan, Fax, Remote, TAPI, MAPI,
etc. etc) has significantly increased -- and you can write VB to use  most
of it -- but understanding what are all the OS capabilities, and  those
parts fit together or interrelate is /has  become a major concern.

Anyone know of a block diagram or book which puts/lists all the OS
capabilites and either or list or explanation of what is done under each?



Sat, 14 Jul 2012 00:14:07 GMT  
 The BIG Picture (VB vs the OS)
Hello,

I always tend to go to the source. Have you tried
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee663300(VS.85).aspx ? It's not as
sophisticated but IMO quite effective (and the more you'll browse there for
APIs, the more you'll notice and remember those in which you could be
interested)...

--
Patrice



Quote:
> When programming (in VB or any other language), the BIG picture of how
> things fits together with the OS tends to get lost.

> The capabilities of what the OS can do (e.g. Scan, Fax, Remote, TAPI,
> MAPI, etc. etc) has significantly increased -- and you can write VB to use
> most of it -- but understanding what are all the OS capabilities, and
> those parts fit together or interrelate is /has  become a major concern.

> Anyone know of a block diagram or book which puts/lists all the OS
> capabilites and either or list or explanation of what is done under each?



Sat, 14 Jul 2012 01:55:30 GMT  
 The BIG Picture (VB vs the OS)


Quote:
> When programming (in VB or any other language), the BIG picture of how
> things fits together with the OS tends to get lost.

> The capabilities of what the OS can do (e.g. Scan, Fax, Remote, TAPI,
> MAPI, etc. etc) has significantly increased -- and you can write VB to use
> most of it -- but understanding what are all the OS capabilities, and
> those parts fit together or interrelate is /has  become a major concern.

> Anyone know of a block diagram or book which puts/lists all the OS
> capabilites and either or list or explanation of what is done under each?

Try MSDN and Wikipedia.

I tend to divide such features by the OS it starts to appear in. VB6 is 32
Bits, and everything that came with it uses features that only exists in
Windows 95. If you use features that only appeared in later OS's, you need
to document the minimum OS required to use your App or document in the
source the minimum OS to use a certain source file or library. Imagine using
something introduced in Vista, then later you find the need to use it in XP
or 2003 Server. In this case, you have to find another workaround.



Sat, 14 Jul 2012 02:33:21 GMT  
 The BIG Picture (VB vs the OS)
Patrice:

That is some of what I was thinking.  However had hoped for something
that could be printed on a page or two that showed "MS OS functionality" in
a block style or better yet a block style with the first tier of the master
treeview showing within each block.

For me my understanding increases significantly if I can see the big picture
and how the system fits together  (what functionally is available from the
OS), rather than focusing on each of its parts in depth.  OS capability has
grown significantly since DOS 1.0, and I, and I'm sure others, no longer
know what the OS can do.

This is more system rather than VB programming, but goes hand in hand.  MSDN
is great for the details, and your link to the main page helps, but again to
much detail.   If you have ever seen an organization chart of a large
corporation (forture 100, or 500), I'm looking for something similiar in
format, but on the OS.


Quote:
> Hello,

> I always tend to go to the source. Have you tried
> http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee663300(VS.85).aspx ? It's not as
> sophisticated but IMO quite effective (and the more you'll browse there
> for APIs, the more you'll notice and remember those in which you could be
> interested)...

> --
> Patrice



>> When programming (in VB or any other language), the BIG picture of how
>> things fits together with the OS tends to get lost.

>> The capabilities of what the OS can do (e.g. Scan, Fax, Remote, TAPI,
>> MAPI, etc. etc) has significantly increased -- and you can write VB to
>> use most of it -- but understanding what are all the OS capabilities, and
>> those parts fit together or interrelate is /has  become a major concern.

>> Anyone know of a block diagram or book which puts/lists all the OS
>> capabilites and either or list or explanation of what is done under each?



Sat, 14 Jul 2012 02:52:37 GMT  
 The BIG Picture (VB vs the OS)
Thanks for response Nobody .

Was hoping something was available in the format I feel most comfortable
using.  That aside, rather than trying to dig through
MSDN (will look into Wikipedia) any place you know of that has a list of
"BIG PICTURE" capabilites.  Having the designated OS would be even better.


Quote:


>> When programming (in VB or any other language), the BIG picture of how
>> things fits together with the OS tends to get lost.

>> The capabilities of what the OS can do (e.g. Scan, Fax, Remote, TAPI,
>> MAPI, etc. etc) has significantly increased -- and you can write VB to
>> use most of it -- but understanding what are all the OS capabilities, and
>> those parts fit together or interrelate is /has  become a major concern.

>> Anyone know of a block diagram or book which puts/lists all the OS
>> capabilites and either or list or explanation of what is done under each?

> Try MSDN and Wikipedia.

> I tend to divide such features by the OS it starts to appear in. VB6 is 32
> Bits, and everything that came with it uses features that only exists in
> Windows 95. If you use features that only appeared in later OS's, you need
> to document the minimum OS required to use your App or document in the
> source the minimum OS to use a certain source file or library. Imagine
> using something introduced in Vista, then later you find the need to use
> it in XP or 2003 Server. In this case, you have to find another
> workaround.



Sat, 14 Jul 2012 23:41:56 GMT  
 The BIG Picture (VB vs the OS)

Quote:
> Thanks for response Nobody .

> Was hoping something was available in the format I feel most comfortable
> using.  That aside, rather than trying to dig through
> MSDN (will look into Wikipedia) any place you know of that has a list of
> "BIG PICTURE" capabilites.

I don't think you will find exactly what you are looking for, but here some
important areas in MSDN Library Oct 2001:

* Platform SDK Documentation-->Base Services. This is a must to look at for
some API functionality. Many beginners miss this because of the simple name.
The online version of MSDN Library changed the name to "System Services",
which is a better name. This can be found at MSDN Library-->Win32 and COM
Development-->System Services.

* Platform SDK Documentation-->User Interface Services-->Windows Common
Controls: Explains the common controls, such as ListView. You can find
messages here that are not exposed by VB controls.

* Platform SDK Documentation-->User Interface Services-->Windows User
Interface-->Controls:  Explains the basic controls, such as text boxes. You
can find messages here that are not exposed by VB controls.

* Platform SDK Documentation-->User Interface Services-->Windows User
Interface-->Windowing: Explains how Windows manages windows, Z-Order, etc.

* Platform SDK Documentation-->Data Services. Explains ADO/XML.

* Platform SDK Documentation-->.NET Enterprise Servers-->Microsoft SQL
Server 2000-->Transact-SQL Reference: MS SQL Server Reference.

I couldn't find Access SQL reference in the 2001 edition of MSDN Library,
but here is the online version, but it's for Access 2007:

Microsoft Access SQL Reference:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb259125.aspx

Quote:
>  Having the designated OS would be even better.

Online MSDN started removing traces of Windows 9x. In many areas, they have
already replaced "Windows 95/98/Me: Included in Windows 95 and later." with
"Minimum supported client: Windows 2000", so you need an old copy of MSDN to
see when a function first appeared. I haven't seen a place online that
clearly documents when a function first appeared.


Sun, 15 Jul 2012 02:49:59 GMT  
 The BIG Picture (VB vs the OS)
Nobody:

Thanks for pointing what you consider to be key areas in MSDN.
I've sent a request to Micrsoft so will see what it yields.
Someone somewhere has got to have a macro overview of
how the OS is put together.   Hopefully, it will include any name changes
for the same thing.  My understanding has now changed NetMeeting to
some other name  in Windows7.

If I get a copy or a link to what I'm after I will post to this thread.

Have a nice day.


Quote:


>> Thanks for response Nobody .

>> Was hoping something was available in the format I feel most comfortable
>> using.  That aside, rather than trying to dig through
>> MSDN (will look into Wikipedia) any place you know of that has a list of
>> "BIG PICTURE" capabilites.

> I don't think you will find exactly what you are looking for, but here
> some important areas in MSDN Library Oct 2001:

> * Platform SDK Documentation-->Base Services. This is a must to look at
> for some API functionality. Many beginners miss this because of the simple
> name. The online version of MSDN Library changed the name to "System
> Services", which is a better name. This can be found at MSDN
> Library-->Win32 and COM Development-->System Services.

> * Platform SDK Documentation-->User Interface Services-->Windows Common
> Controls: Explains the common controls, such as ListView. You can find
> messages here that are not exposed by VB controls.

> * Platform SDK Documentation-->User Interface Services-->Windows User
> Interface-->Controls:  Explains the basic controls, such as text boxes.
> You can find messages here that are not exposed by VB controls.

> * Platform SDK Documentation-->User Interface Services-->Windows User
> Interface-->Windowing: Explains how Windows manages windows, Z-Order, etc.

> * Platform SDK Documentation-->Data Services. Explains ADO/XML.

> * Platform SDK Documentation-->.NET Enterprise Servers-->Microsoft SQL
> Server 2000-->Transact-SQL Reference: MS SQL Server Reference.

> I couldn't find Access SQL reference in the 2001 edition of MSDN Library,
> but here is the online version, but it's for Access 2007:

> Microsoft Access SQL Reference:
> http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb259125.aspx

>>  Having the designated OS would be even better.

> Online MSDN started removing traces of Windows 9x. In many areas, they
> have already replaced "Windows 95/98/Me: Included in Windows 95 and
> later." with "Minimum supported client: Windows 2000", so you need an old
> copy of MSDN to see when a function first appeared. I haven't seen a place
> online that clearly documents when a function first appeared.



Sun, 15 Jul 2012 22:50:06 GMT  
 The BIG Picture (VB vs the OS)
It should "Windows Meeting Space".

Your last post make me realize that you are perhaps looking at a higher
level lists of components such as :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Microsoft_Windows_components

Most of those components are supported by a lower level API provided by the
OS.  Is this level of detail you are looking for ?

--
Patrice



Quote:
> Nobody:

> Thanks for pointing what you consider to be key areas in MSDN.
> I've sent a request to Micrsoft so will see what it yields.
> Someone somewhere has got to have a macro overview of
> how the OS is put together.   Hopefully, it will include any name changes
> for the same thing.  My understanding has now changed NetMeeting to
> some other name  in Windows7.

> If I get a copy or a link to what I'm after I will post to this thread.

> Have a nice day.





>>> Thanks for response Nobody .

>>> Was hoping something was available in the format I feel most comfortable
>>> using.  That aside, rather than trying to dig through
>>> MSDN (will look into Wikipedia) any place you know of that has a list of
>>> "BIG PICTURE" capabilites.

>> I don't think you will find exactly what you are looking for, but here
>> some important areas in MSDN Library Oct 2001:

>> * Platform SDK Documentation-->Base Services. This is a must to look at
>> for some API functionality. Many beginners miss this because of the
>> simple name. The online version of MSDN Library changed the name to
>> "System Services", which is a better name. This can be found at MSDN
>> Library-->Win32 and COM Development-->System Services.

>> * Platform SDK Documentation-->User Interface Services-->Windows Common
>> Controls: Explains the common controls, such as ListView. You can find
>> messages here that are not exposed by VB controls.

>> * Platform SDK Documentation-->User Interface Services-->Windows User
>> Interface-->Controls:  Explains the basic controls, such as text boxes.
>> You can find messages here that are not exposed by VB controls.

>> * Platform SDK Documentation-->User Interface Services-->Windows User
>> Interface-->Windowing: Explains how Windows manages windows, Z-Order,
>> etc.

>> * Platform SDK Documentation-->Data Services. Explains ADO/XML.

>> * Platform SDK Documentation-->.NET Enterprise Servers-->Microsoft SQL
>> Server 2000-->Transact-SQL Reference: MS SQL Server Reference.

>> I couldn't find Access SQL reference in the 2001 edition of MSDN Library,
>> but here is the online version, but it's for Access 2007:

>> Microsoft Access SQL Reference:
>> http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb259125.aspx

>>>  Having the designated OS would be even better.

>> Online MSDN started removing traces of Windows 9x. In many areas, they
>> have already replaced "Windows 95/98/Me: Included in Windows 95 and
>> later." with "Minimum supported client: Windows 2000", so you need an old
>> copy of MSDN to see when a function first appeared. I haven't seen a
>> place online that clearly documents when a function first appeared.



Mon, 16 Jul 2012 23:34:16 GMT  
 
 [ 8 post ] 

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