3 (4) tier Design / OO-Design 
Author Message
 3 (4) tier Design / OO-Design

In our company we use within the analyse/design phase a 4 tier design.
Microsoft itselfs speaks about a 3 tier design. So far so good. The
adventure now is to copy the logical design to a physical structure,
especially with the focus on component development (hierarchical,
vertical).

Has anyone experiences with this approach or are there any information
(books, newsletters, magazines,etc.) which describe it?

Kind regards
Klaus Sierp
Bertelsmann CIS



Fri, 01 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 3 (4) tier Design / OO-Design

If 3-tier is User Interface, Business Rules, and Data... what would the 4th
tier be?

BTW, VisualBasic 4 Enterprise Development by Que ISBN: 0-7897-0099-9 is
mostly about 3-tier design.

As with most books, it seems pretty good but I am still scratching my head
over how to implement the concepts contained therein. Working dilligently
add it but alas VB is not my strongest skill and this is not a full-time
endeavor.

Happy Trails,
Roderick...



Sat, 02 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 3 (4) tier Design / OO-Design

Quote:

> If 3-tier is User Interface, Business Rules, and Data... what would the 4th
> tier be?

> BTW, VisualBasic 4 Enterprise Development by Que ISBN: 0-7897-0099-9 is
> mostly about 3-tier design.

> As with most books, it seems pretty good but I am still scratching my head
> over how to implement the concepts contained therein. Working dilligently
> add it but alas VB is not my strongest skill and this is not a full-time
> endeavor.

> Happy Trails,
> Roderick...

The 4 layers are:
Dialog Layer
Business Layer
Functional Layer
Data Layer

Regards

Quote:

> If 3-tier is User Interface, Business Rules, and Data... what would the 4th
> tier be?

> BTW, VisualBasic 4 Enterprise Development by Que ISBN: 0-7897-0099-9 is
> mostly about 3-tier design.

> As with most books, it seems pretty good but I am still scratching my head
> over how to implement the concepts contained therein. Working dilligently
> add it but alas VB is not my strongest skill and this is not a full-time
> endeavor.

> Happy Trails,
> Roderick...

Klaus Sierp


Sun, 03 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 3 (4) tier Design / OO-Design

To Roderick Prince,

I found "Visual Basic 4 Enterprise Development" to be a great book. There
is only one problem that I've found with it so far, which the business
server component design section to be very weak.

I would still recommend the book to anyone doing 3-tier or more
development.

I've also had to spend a lot of time learning new aspects for the
implementation of the book features.

BTW, I wrote the author, Craig Goren, and he said they were working on a
book for Visual Basic 5 Enterprise Development. This will probably included
MTS information.

Their web site is www.claritycnslt.com

They have more information on the book and additional help.

Eric



Quote:

> If 3-tier is User Interface, Business Rules, and Data... what would the
4th
> tier be?

> BTW, VisualBasic 4 Enterprise Development by Que ISBN: 0-7897-0099-9 is
> mostly about 3-tier design.

> As with most books, it seems pretty good but I am still scratching my
head
> over how to implement the concepts contained therein. Working dilligently
> add it but alas VB is not my strongest skill and this is not a full-time
> endeavor.

> Happy Trails,
> Roderick...



Mon, 04 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 3 (4) tier Design / OO-Design

Eric,

Purchased the book based on the knowledge Craig displayed at a developer
conference in Chicago.

Personally I find the seperation of the tiers to be a very appropriate and
natural approach. I look forward to his upcoming book.

I am sure I will be successfull in making the concepts work - just need
time to work on the side project I am using them on.

Happy trails,
Roderick...



Quote:
> To Roderick Prince,

> I found "Visual Basic 4 Enterprise Development" to be a great book. There
> is only one problem that I've found with it so far, which the business
> server component design section to be very weak.

> I would still recommend the book to anyone doing 3-tier or more
> development.



Mon, 04 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 3 (4) tier Design / OO-Design

Quote:
>If 3-tier is User Interface, Business Rules, and Data... what would the 4th
>tier be?

Whatever.  There's much talk of N-tier architectures.  Even 2-tier
client/server isn't easy.  But they're all fun.  Really.  

Josh



Mon, 04 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 3 (4) tier Design / OO-Design



Quote:
>>If 3-tier is User Interface, Business Rules, and Data... what would the 4th
>>tier be?

The definition I found in "Crossing Chasms... the Architectural
Patterns" located at http://www.ksccary.com/archptrn.htm indicates
that the four layers are:

1. Views layer
2. Application model layer (which maps views layer to domain layer)
3. Domain layer (business logic)
4. and Infrastructure Layer (database access, etc...)

,Jerry



Sat, 09 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 3 (4) tier Design / OO-Design

Jerry,

Guess I don't get it. When do you commit to writing code?

The user interface talks to the application model layer,
The application model layer talks to the business rules,
The business rules talk to the back-end,
Your users talk to your boss,
You talk to the un-employment people,

What the heck does the application model do for you that the business rules
don't?

Do you ever wonder if just doing it the old fashioned way wouldn't be alot
faster?

Happy trails,
Roderick...



Quote:


> >>If 3-tier is User Interface, Business Rules, and Data... what would the
4th
> >>tier be?

> The definition I found in "Crossing Chasms... the Architectural
> Patterns" located at http://www.ksccary.com/archptrn.htm indicates
> that the four layers are:

> 1. Views layer
> 2. Application model layer (which maps views layer to domain layer)
> 3. Domain layer (business logic)
> 4. and Infrastructure Layer (database access, etc...)

> ,Jerry



Sun, 10 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 3 (4) tier Design / OO-Design

Quote:
>Jerry,
>Guess I don't get it. When do you commit to writing code?

It would probably be best if you just read the article I referenced -
(http://www.ksccary.com/archptrn.htm)... It is important to note that
multi-tiered applications are not suited for every business solution,
but particularly in large development projects multi-tiered designs
can be incredibly valuable. In languages such as VB I think it is
probably unnecessary to make the distinction between the first two
layers, because as the 'Crossing Chasms' Pattern indicates these two
layers will reside on the client in most cases anyway... I think
languages such as Smalltalk probably lend themselves to the four-tier
pattern more so... (Confirmation or denial from SmallTalk experts goes
here...)

,Jerry



Sun, 10 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 3 (4) tier Design / OO-Design

Quote:
>Guess I don't get it. When do you commit to writing code?

That's half of it.  There's another catch.  Say you've written
seven{*filter*} layers of architecture.  A user presses a key.  Eleven
layers have to be consulted to determine the response.

Quote:
>Do you ever wonder if just doing it the old fashioned way wouldn't be alot
>faster?

Regularly.  NC, XWindows, ...

However, the new stuff still needs a few years to mature.

Josh



Sun, 10 Oct 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 10 post ] 

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