VB 6 to VB .NET 
Author Message
 VB 6 to VB .NET

Hello.  I previously had used VB 6.0.  I have a large prj and I can not
import.  On the shrink wraped box it said that it could import.  When i try
to import, it gives me a dialog, that my version of VS.Net does not support
importing.  O, its standard.   MB I missed somthing.  Please email.


Sat, 11 Sep 2004 09:22:41 GMT  
 VB 6 to VB .NET



Quote:
> Hello.  I previously had used VB 6.0.  I have a large prj and I can not
> import.  On the shrink wraped box it said that it could import.  When i
try
> to import, it gives me a dialog, that my version of VS.Net does not
support
> importing.  O, its standard.   MB I missed somthing.  Please email.

Can't help you with the specific problem of VB.NET not upgrading a VB6
project (maybe Standard edition of VB.NET doesn't include the VB6 upgrade
wizard)...but I can tell you that you don't want to do this anyway,
particularly for a "large" project. Even assuming a "successful  upgrade" of
the VB6 project, you'd still have to make numerous code changes to get it to
work in VB.NET.  VB.NET is sufficiently different from VB6 that in order to
take advantage of what .NET offers, your best choice is really to start over
from scratch.  You may be able to copy and paste a few procedures here and
there with minimal code changes, but you're really better off redesigning
and rewriting your program.

Mike



Sat, 11 Sep 2004 12:53:45 GMT  
 VB 6 to VB .NET
Mike,

First, you are correct that the standard edition does not come with the
upgrade wizard.  Check out the following 2 sites for more informatoin about
this:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/vbco...
vbconupgradingapplicationscreatedinpreviousversionsofvisualbasic.asp
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/vbco...
vbgrfvisualbasicstandardeditionfeatures.asp

Second, I have to disagree with you about not running the upgrade wizard.  
I do agree that for many "large" projects the upgrade may not be smooth or
easy.  The wizard will probably leave you with a decent sized todo list for
migrating some sections of code.  But, if the large project is generally
made up of very standard VB functions and syntax, then the upgrade may go
very smooth.  However; if it includes a lot of advanced functionality then
it may be a very difficult task.  But really there is no reason to not run
the upgrade wizard.  It will simply create a new VB .NET project and give
you a todo list of things it cannot convert.  When the wizard is done
running you can look at that todo list and see if you think it is worth it
to continue down the upgrade path.  If it is a short list, then it should
be quick and easy to finish the upgrade.  If it is a long list, then maybe
you should put off the upgrade until it makes more sense to do it.  For a
large project the wizard may take a significant amount of time to process,
so you would just leave it to work overnight.  So upgrading is really a
no-lose situation and it will at least give you an idea of what type of
task you are up against when it comes time to upgrade or rewrite.

Kevin Williamson - Microsoft Visual Basic Developer Support
This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
You assume all risk for your use. ? 2001 Microsoft Corporation. All rights
reserved.

--------------------


| Subject: Re: VB 6 to VB .NET

| Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2002 23:53:45 -0500
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| > Hello.  I previously had used VB 6.0.  I have a large prj and I can not
| > import.  On the shrink wraped box it said that it could import.  When i
| try
| > to import, it gives me a dialog, that my version of VS.Net does not
| support
| > importing.  O, its standard.   MB I missed somthing.  Please email.
|
| Can't help you with the specific problem of VB.NET not upgrading a VB6
| project (maybe Standard edition of VB.NET doesn't include the VB6 upgrade
| wizard)...but I can tell you that you don't want to do this anyway,
| particularly for a "large" project. Even assuming a "successful  upgrade"
of
| the VB6 project, you'd still have to make numerous code changes to get it
to
| work in VB.NET.  VB.NET is sufficiently different from VB6 that in order
to
| take advantage of what .NET offers, your best choice is really to start
over
| from scratch.  You may be able to copy and paste a few procedures here and
| there with minimal code changes, but you're really better off redesigning
| and rewriting your program.
|
| Mike
|
|
|
|



Sat, 11 Sep 2004 23:37:34 GMT  
 VB 6 to VB .NET


Quote:

> Second, I have to disagree with you about not running the upgrade wizard.
> I do agree that for many "large" projects the upgrade may not be smooth or
> easy.  The wizard will probably leave you with a decent sized todo list
for
> migrating some sections of code.  But, if the large project is generally
> made up of very standard VB functions and syntax, then the upgrade may go
> very smooth.  However; if it includes a lot of advanced functionality then
> it may be a very difficult task.  But really there is no reason to not run
> the upgrade wizard.  It will simply create a new VB .NET project and give
> you a todo list of things it cannot convert.  When the wizard is done
> running you can look at that todo list and see if you think it is worth it
> to continue down the upgrade path.  If it is a short list, then it should
> be quick and easy to finish the upgrade.  If it is a long list, then maybe
> you should put off the upgrade until it makes more sense to do it.  For a
> large project the wizard may take a significant amount of time to process,
> so you would just leave it to work overnight.  So upgrading is really a
> no-lose situation and it will at least give you an idea of what type of
> task you are up against when it comes time to upgrade or rewrite.

You missed my point, or perhaps I didn't make it clear.  My point was
intended to be that .NET offers quite different ways (presumably better
ways) to do many tasks.  Upgrading a VB6 project will NOT take advantage of
any of this (for example, the new error handling, OOP features, etc.), or at
least very little of it.  Plus, the VB6 compatibility object will
undoubtedly come into use in an upgraded project.  I'm not saying this is
good or bad.  But to me, just the fact that I need a compatibility object
probably means I could be writing my code and/or designing my app better.

I personally see little point in upgrading a VB6 project to VB.NET as far as
production code goes.  In order to take advantage of what .NET can really
offer, you pretty much need to completely redesign your app.  If you upgrade
a VB6 project and make changes here and there to the ".NET way", you're
probably going to end up re-writing most of it anyway and it will probably
also closely resemble spaghetti code.  My opinion is that you'd be better
off starting from scratch.

However, I won't deny that I'm also of the opinion that the upgrade wizard
is good for learning about .NET.  As you pointed out, it will make a ToDo
list for you, and you can also compare differences of the original VB6 code
and the upgraded VB.NET code.  This can be valuable in learning some of the
differences between VB6 and VB.NET. IOW, I consider the upgrade wizard to be
a learning aid.....but nothing I'd *ever* consider using for production code
regardless of the size of the project.

Mike



Mon, 13 Sep 2004 13:37:28 GMT  
 VB 6 to VB .NET
Thanks.  I decided to start over.  It was my only option.

Quote:



> > Second, I have to disagree with you about not running the upgrade
wizard.
> > I do agree that for many "large" projects the upgrade may not be smooth
or
> > easy.  The wizard will probably leave you with a decent sized todo list
> for
> > migrating some sections of code.  But, if the large project is generally
> > made up of very standard VB functions and syntax, then the upgrade may
go
> > very smooth.  However; if it includes a lot of advanced functionality
then
> > it may be a very difficult task.  But really there is no reason to not
run
> > the upgrade wizard.  It will simply create a new VB .NET project and
give
> > you a todo list of things it cannot convert.  When the wizard is done
> > running you can look at that todo list and see if you think it is worth
it
> > to continue down the upgrade path.  If it is a short list, then it
should
> > be quick and easy to finish the upgrade.  If it is a long list, then
maybe
> > you should put off the upgrade until it makes more sense to do it.  For
a
> > large project the wizard may take a significant amount of time to
process,
> > so you would just leave it to work overnight.  So upgrading is really a
> > no-lose situation and it will at least give you an idea of what type of
> > task you are up against when it comes time to upgrade or rewrite.

> You missed my point, or perhaps I didn't make it clear.  My point was
> intended to be that .NET offers quite different ways (presumably better
> ways) to do many tasks.  Upgrading a VB6 project will NOT take advantage
of
> any of this (for example, the new error handling, OOP features, etc.), or
at
> least very little of it.  Plus, the VB6 compatibility object will
> undoubtedly come into use in an upgraded project.  I'm not saying this is
> good or bad.  But to me, just the fact that I need a compatibility object
> probably means I could be writing my code and/or designing my app better.

> I personally see little point in upgrading a VB6 project to VB.NET as far
as
> production code goes.  In order to take advantage of what .NET can really
> offer, you pretty much need to completely redesign your app.  If you
upgrade
> a VB6 project and make changes here and there to the ".NET way", you're
> probably going to end up re-writing most of it anyway and it will probably
> also closely resemble spaghetti code.  My opinion is that you'd be better
> off starting from scratch.

> However, I won't deny that I'm also of the opinion that the upgrade wizard
> is good for learning about .NET.  As you pointed out, it will make a ToDo
> list for you, and you can also compare differences of the original VB6
code
> and the upgraded VB.NET code.  This can be valuable in learning some of
the
> differences between VB6 and VB.NET. IOW, I consider the upgrade wizard to
be
> a learning aid.....but nothing I'd *ever* consider using for production
code
> regardless of the size of the project.

> Mike



Tue, 14 Sep 2004 08:29:49 GMT  
 
 [ 5 post ] 

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