Top 10 Things CRM is good for? 
Author Message
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?

I would like to know the top 10 things CRM is good for and that can't be
*really* done BETTER any other way....

If I spend $1 million on a CRM implementation, what is one "SPECIFIC" thing
I should be able to do with it?



Sun, 07 Aug 2005 08:52:21 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?


Quote:
> I would like to know the top 10 things CRM is good for and that can't
be
> *really* done BETTER any other way....

> If I spend $1 million on a CRM implementation, what is one "SPECIFIC"
thing
> I should be able to do with it?

What does this have to with C#? Or .NET? Or VB.NET? Or SQL Server?

-c



Sun, 07 Aug 2005 11:22:31 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?
I think even lots of "specific" things are waiting for you:

- You'll have to hire admins and programmers if you have none or train
existing ones
- you'll need to buy also interface development for your existing system if
it is not available and redesign your web site (intra or internet or both)
- you'll need to buy training for users
- you'll need to buy maintenance for package
- you'll need to establish security, data access and backup and recovery
plans
- you'll need to spend time to understand how it works and what it
produces - at least to read user manual, installation guides etc.
- you'll need to hire clerks and managers to supervise and organize data
input (validity, consistency, integrity - you name it)
- you'll need to organize help desk for users and train it
- you'll need to correct errors and issues found during operation - throw in
operators, operating manuals etc.
- you'll need to investigate and understand why crm data do not drive your
business ahead of MS

Then you will be able to do not one but hundreds of additional specific
things like hardware upgrade, software patching and upgrading, team
training, project management and development around system. Don't forget
also about nice reports - logos, fonts, standards and page numbering - in
your unique style. If you are lucky, you even might get some statistics and
valid contact information from it - if you'll manage to pump relevant data
in.

There is only one but as I see it: if you won't buy it, you'll have to
develop nice interface to your database and required reports (if any)
yourself. And database itself. And the rest of things mentioned.

I think I missed some issues - but if you are ready to spend 1Mio, you can
certainly spend couple hundred thousands for professional consultancy - to
plug the holes.

In each of specific tasks CRM might stink to the heaven, but as combination
of stinking features it could be very impressive...

Just could keep myself restrained...
HTH
Alex


Quote:
> I would like to know the top 10 things CRM is good for and that can't be
> *really* done BETTER any other way....

> If I spend $1 million on a CRM implementation, what is one "SPECIFIC"
thing
> I should be able to do with it?



Sun, 07 Aug 2005 11:22:06 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?
Any thing you are doing to increase your customers' satisfaction, retention,
increase sales etc. can be treated as CRM. So, hopefully your $1mio
implementation helps you to achieve some of the issues mentioned...

--
Dejan Sarka, SQL Server MVP
FAQ from Neil & others at: http://www.sqlserverfaq.com
Please reply only to the newsgroups.
PASS - the definitive, global community
for SQL Server professionals - http://www.sqlpass.org


Quote:
> I would like to know the top 10 things CRM is good for and that can't be
> *really* done BETTER any other way....

> If I spend $1 million on a CRM implementation, what is one "SPECIFIC"
thing
> I should be able to do with it?



Sun, 07 Aug 2005 16:43:05 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?
Can you "specifically" name at least ONE thing in a CRM package that makes
it worth looking at or even worth buying?



Quote:
> Any thing you are doing to increase your customers' satisfaction,
retention,
> increase sales etc. can be treated as CRM. So, hopefully your $1mio
> implementation helps you to achieve some of the issues mentioned...

> --
> Dejan Sarka, SQL Server MVP
> FAQ from Neil & others at: http://www.sqlserverfaq.com
> Please reply only to the newsgroups.
> PASS - the definitive, global community
> for SQL Server professionals - http://www.sqlpass.org



> > I would like to know the top 10 things CRM is good for and that can't be
> > *really* done BETTER any other way....

> > If I spend $1 million on a CRM implementation, what is one "SPECIFIC"
> thing
> > I should be able to do with it?



Sun, 07 Aug 2005 15:33:17 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?
Depends on package, but some of possibilities could include:

1. Managing ODS (Operational Data Store - check http://www.billinmon.com/),
i.e. managing enterprise merged current customer data
2. Data Mining - finding decision patterns of your customers
3. ClickStream analysis - making personalized Web pages
4. Managing direct contacts with your customers - e-mail etc.
5. Call Center support
...

--
Dejan Sarka, SQL Server MVP
FAQ from Neil & others at: http://www.sqlserverfaq.com
Please reply only to the newsgroups.
PASS - the definitive, global community
for SQL Server professionals - http://www.sqlpass.org



Sun, 07 Aug 2005 21:31:27 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?
Just a thought to ponder in regards to increasing customers' satisfaction.

Will the money one spends on and related to such a system,
increase the customers' satisfaction; more than,
simply passing out the money to the customers instead?
Or even better, having lower prices so as not to be taking
the money from the customers in the first place.

Bye,
Delbert Glass



Quote:
> Any thing you are doing to increase your customers' satisfaction,
retention,
> increase sales etc. can be treated as CRM. So, hopefully your $1mio
> implementation helps you to achieve some of the issues mentioned...

> --
> Dejan Sarka, SQL Server MVP
> FAQ from Neil & others at: http://www.sqlserverfaq.com
> Please reply only to the newsgroups.
> PASS - the definitive, global community
> for SQL Server professionals - http://www.sqlpass.org



> > I would like to know the top 10 things CRM is good for and that can't be
> > *really* done BETTER any other way....

> > If I spend $1 million on a CRM implementation, what is one "SPECIFIC"
> thing
> > I should be able to do with it?



Mon, 08 Aug 2005 05:16:14 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?
Some of most efficient managers mix up "customer satisfaction" with
"managers satisfaction" and increased personal profits. Spam is also kind of
CRM in action - anybody has satisfaction increased due to increase of spam?
However business should be profitable - or it won't exist in the long run.
Question is - CRM is like crutches for crippled business or like engine
boost for running one? Is the price related to performance? Or is it more
like enron-style kickback and Rolex for blind?

Are there real figures available - not commercial hype? What are the real
gains for business and its customers after investment of 1mio into CRM?


Quote:
> Just a thought to ponder in regards to increasing customers' satisfaction.

> Will the money one spends on and related to such a system,
> increase the customers' satisfaction; more than,
> simply passing out the money to the customers instead?
> Or even better, having lower prices so as not to be taking
> the money from the customers in the first place.

> Bye,
> Delbert Glass



> > Any thing you are doing to increase your customers' satisfaction,
> retention,
> > increase sales etc. can be treated as CRM. So, hopefully your $1mio
> > implementation helps you to achieve some of the issues mentioned...

> > --
> > Dejan Sarka, SQL Server MVP
> > FAQ from Neil & others at: http://www.sqlserverfaq.com
> > Please reply only to the newsgroups.
> > PASS - the definitive, global community
> > for SQL Server professionals - http://www.sqlpass.org



> > > I would like to know the top 10 things CRM is good for and that can't
be
> > > *really* done BETTER any other way....

> > > If I spend $1 million on a CRM implementation, what is one "SPECIFIC"
> > thing
> > > I should be able to do with it?



Mon, 08 Aug 2005 05:59:29 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?
I don't see anything in these list of possibilites that has been done a long
time ago.



Quote:
> Depends on package, but some of possibilities could include:

> 1. Managing ODS (Operational Data Store - check

http://www.billinmon.com/),
Quote:
> i.e. managing enterprise merged current customer data
> 2. Data Mining - finding decision patterns of your customers
> 3. ClickStream analysis - making personalized Web pages
> 4. Managing direct contacts with your customers - e-mail etc.
> 5. Call Center support
> ...

> --
> Dejan Sarka, SQL Server MVP
> FAQ from Neil & others at: http://www.sqlserverfaq.com
> Please reply only to the newsgroups.
> PASS - the definitive, global community
> for SQL Server professionals - http://www.sqlpass.org



Mon, 08 Aug 2005 04:26:12 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?
Check out a company called Firepond.  They may have your solution


Quote:
> I don't see anything in these list of possibilites that has been done a
long
> time ago.



> > Depends on package, but some of possibilities could include:

> > 1. Managing ODS (Operational Data Store - check
> http://www.billinmon.com/),
> > i.e. managing enterprise merged current customer data
> > 2. Data Mining - finding decision patterns of your customers
> > 3. ClickStream analysis - making personalized Web pages
> > 4. Managing direct contacts with your customers - e-mail etc.
> > 5. Call Center support
> > ...

> > --
> > Dejan Sarka, SQL Server MVP
> > FAQ from Neil & others at: http://www.sqlserverfaq.com
> > Please reply only to the newsgroups.
> > PASS - the definitive, global community
> > for SQL Server professionals - http://www.sqlpass.org



Mon, 08 Aug 2005 09:07:40 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?

there is a fundamental problem with CRM;  relationships should be nurtured,
not managed .. and you can't do it with software


Quote:
> Some of most efficient managers mix up "customer satisfaction" with
> "managers satisfaction" and increased personal profits. Spam is also kind
of
> CRM in action - anybody has satisfaction increased due to increase of
spam?
> However business should be profitable - or it won't exist in the long run.
> Question is - CRM is like crutches for crippled business or like engine
> boost for running one? Is the price related to performance? Or is it more
> like enron-style kickback and Rolex for blind?

> Are there real figures available - not commercial hype? What are the real
> gains for business and its customers after investment of 1mio into CRM?



> > Just a thought to ponder in regards to increasing customers'
satisfaction.

> > Will the money one spends on and related to such a system,
> > increase the customers' satisfaction; more than,
> > simply passing out the money to the customers instead?
> > Or even better, having lower prices so as not to be taking
> > the money from the customers in the first place.

> > Bye,
> > Delbert Glass


in

> > > Any thing you are doing to increase your customers' satisfaction,
> > retention,
> > > increase sales etc. can be treated as CRM. So, hopefully your $1mio
> > > implementation helps you to achieve some of the issues mentioned...

> > > --
> > > Dejan Sarka, SQL Server MVP
> > > FAQ from Neil & others at: http://www.sqlserverfaq.com
> > > Please reply only to the newsgroups.
> > > PASS - the definitive, global community
> > > for SQL Server professionals - http://www.sqlpass.org



> > > > I would like to know the top 10 things CRM is good for and that
can't
> be
> > > > *really* done BETTER any other way....

> > > > If I spend $1 million on a CRM implementation, what is one
"SPECIFIC"
> > > thing
> > > > I should be able to do with it?



Mon, 08 Aug 2005 11:24:05 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?
Pray tell,
would anyone spend money doing such a study
if it were not for commercial purposes?

But let us try considering a study to be a study.

Well I did a search for "CRM" on yahoo and
see the following links on the first page.
http://www.crmcommunity.com/
http://www.crm-forum.com/

I see a fair amount of reading material
but didn't spy any study results right off.

So I search for "CRM study" on yahoo.
The first web match said "CRM Study."
Following the link leads to:
"On average, business leaders expected
a 22 per cent increase in sales attributable to CRM."

Ponder:
Was that a study or a survey?
If study vs survey is being misrepresented,
dare I believe anything else?

Looking a little closer; at least,
it refers to itself as a survey.

I'll leave it to you to continue
your quest for actual results;
instead of, expected results.
But keep in mind, making the measurements
is not something most business can do not all
long less to any degree of accuracy or precision
(Perhaps we are expected to believe
that is what a CRM enables one to do.)

Meanwhile, I'm left suspecting that many companies
would simply ignore the information coming from
such a system regardless of how much many they spent.
After all, if it were any good, it would end up telling
them something they already know.

Ie. how much money do companies need to spend
on a system before doing something about things
like the following.

Opps,
considering the amount of traffic in the newsgroup
the thread will already be a long way down by now
so I'll switch to making some brief mentions.

----

Telling customer incorrect instructions
for opening and funding an account
(especially if those incorrect instructions
are possibly unlawful or at costly to the customer).

Failing to allow customer to login with correct passwords.

Failing to mail customer passwords,
whenever you say you are (multiple times).

Whenever the customer calls in saying
the passwords have still not arrived,
assure the customer the passwords are in the mail.
And then later when the customer calls in again
saying the passwords have still not arrived,
telling the customer the passwords
are held up at the printers.
(How can they be in the mail
if they have not be printed?)

Failing to address security problems
whenever reported by the customer.

Leaving customer locked out of accounts for months.

Failing to rollover the funds from the rollover account
to the roth account during all those months.
(The funds should have been rolled over per the
appropriate sections of the account applications.)

Failing to mail customer blank new account application form
whenever you say you are (multiple times).

Dude saying he is a vice-president,
telling the customer all the same excuses
about why the customer's passwords wouldn't work.
Such as, our records show you changed your password.
(Recall, I did change them and used them several times
watching for the funds).

Dude saying he is a vice-president,
telling the customer it is company policy that
the above problems do *not* go to the company president.

Ponder: Why would a company have such a policy?

---

Being mean to the customer trying to get them
to go away instead of (I guess sometimes in addition to)
addressing the problems with your product.

Whenever a customer calls in about problems
with your ASPI TWAIN driver, tell the customer
to use the STI TWAIN driver.
*AND*
Tell the customer to use the ASPI TWAIN driver
whenever they call in about problems with
the STI TWAIN driver.

Giving the customer your word that the
dishonorable behavior will be address,
but then go on to repeat the dishonorable
behavior yourself.

Giving your word to the customer that their
questions will be answered and then
fail to contact the customer at all.

Giving your word to the customer that the
problems will be fix and then later telling the
customer you are under no obligation to fix the problems.

Most every time the customer contacts
your company about problems they have
already reported, play like you are confused
about what version of the product the
customer is using and tell them to download
another version (even playing like this is the first
time the problem is being reported -- again).

Be mean to the customer for a long period of time,
before finally wanting to "try to reproduce" the problem,
but insist on using some new version that was just
released instead the version that is reported to have the problem.

When the customer reports a problem,
and ask if the company considers
the current behavior to be TWAIN compliant or not,
tell the customer you will have someone
contact them to discuss the issue,
but fail to ever contact the customer.

When the customer reports they have not
been contacted, tell the customer to
continue to bring their questions to you;
yet, never provide the customer with an answer
to the question they have already asked.

When the customer reports their question
is still unanswered and mentions it would be
appropriate to receive the company's answer
to the question before contacting the TWAIN
organization for clarification,
tell the customer your company will contact
the TWAIN organization.
Further more, never:
- give the customer an answer to the question
- notify the customer a request for clarification has been made.
- give the customer a copy of the clarification.

Let see, the vendor did send me something
written by the TWAIN organization.
It appears to be page 1-4 of the TWAIN specification
with the following items highlighted.

#1
"Key elements of the TWAIN implementation "belong" in the operating
system. The agreement between Microsoft and the TWAIN Working Group
indicates
that this integration into the operating system is beginning."

#2
"Allow an application vendor to make their application TWAIN compliant
with a reasonable amount of development and testing effort."

Could #1 have anything to do with the fact that this guy
yells STI every time I mention *anything* about ASPI
and could that have to do with the fact that one of
the problems I've reported I said I saw under ASPI but not STI?
(As if that were the only problem I've reported.)
Furthermore, what about the vendor's failure to even provide
information needed when working with the STI driver.

Could #2 be contradictory?

This highlight #2 is coming from a guy that has told me:
It sounds like you use TWAIN quite a lot,
have you ever consider joining the TWAIN organization?

To see the contradication, consider:
What is my experience using TWAIN?
Our customers complained they could
no longer control the scan operation.
Our programmer for the scanning portion of our application
was unable to resolve what the problem was
even after having calling the scanner vendor.
So I was ask to take a look. Sadly, my conclusion was:
"The reason you cannot control the scan operation
is because you do not have control!"
Perhaps, you can guess what happened next.
I am charged with the task of getting our
application (back) in control of the scan operation.
Sadly, it is taking much effort due to the
dishonorable behavior of the vendor.
So much effort that the vendor considers
I use TWAIN quite a lot; which is sad,
considering the majority of my experience
with TWAIN amounts to trying to get the vendor to
fix and support their product.

Futhermore let's consider does reasonable effort include:
-doing things that the vendor
is unwilling and/or unable to document?
-doing things that the vendor's own software engineer
is unable to figure out how to do?
-having to figure out (without documentation) all sorts
of things ranging from what files will the driver read/write
to the state represented by the setting/getting of the standard
twain settings may not apply to the upcoming scan, etc?

(in the style of the rest of the post)

Taking pride in your companies ability
to save infomation somewhere other then
the ini file you have told developers
you will save information in.
Futhermore, there is no documentation telling
developers what ini files the drivers will use.

Failing to tell the customer now an application
can determine which ini filenames to use.

Failing to tell the customer now an application
can determine which section filenames to use
(for ini files nor custom data).

Honestly, I am not making this up.
Is this really reasonable effort?

Telling the customer something cannot be done
and then telling the customer that is the recommended way.

Telling the customer to use the device name
in step in a process
to figure out what the device name is.

Asking the customer to send you a sample program,
because you can not figure out how to call the
routine the customer is reporting a problem with;
especially whenever, your company does NOT provide developers
with any documention (long less examples) other
than the TWAIN specification; especially whenever,
the routine in question is for vendor specific data.

(end of "Could #2")

Gee, I am only trying to mention some of them.
Let me stop with two more:

Sending the customer a document marked confidential
that does not (and should not) contain the information
the customer needs. At least it was ok for me to receive
confidential information, but that does not make it ok
to send it out.

Telling the customer to not contact Japan because
everyone over there speaks Japanese.

---

How about a different vendor.

Presenting your product as TWAIN compliant.
But then being mean to customer whenever
they ask about using your product at the TWAIN level.

Whenever the customer reports dishonorable behavior,
brag about how *professional* your team is
and how you have *never* received a complaint.
(Didn't you just receive mine?)

Perhaps this vendor is just following the above vendor's lead.
I don't know one way or the other.
But I can say, further elaboration/conclusion on the stories,
make the stories look even more similar except for one notable execption:
This vendor got around to stating,
they don't encourage I use TWAIN.

---

How much do CRM ...

read more »



Mon, 08 Aug 2005 15:35:20 GMT  
 Top 10 Things CRM is good for?
Hmm..

CRM = Name of Dilbert's Company? (The Comic Strip)

What's worse, getting CRM'd or getting FUBAR'ed?


Quote:
> Pray tell,
> would anyone spend money doing such a study
> if it were not for commercial purposes?

> But let us try considering a study to be a study.

> Well I did a search for "CRM" on yahoo and
> see the following links on the first page.
> http://www.crmcommunity.com/
> http://www.crm-forum.com/

> I see a fair amount of reading material
> but didn't spy any study results right off.

> So I search for "CRM study" on yahoo.
> The first web match said "CRM Study."
> Following the link leads to:
> "On average, business leaders expected
> a 22 per cent increase in sales attributable to CRM."

> Ponder:
> Was that a study or a survey?
> If study vs survey is being misrepresented,
> dare I believe anything else?

> Looking a little closer; at least,
> it refers to itself as a survey.

> I'll leave it to you to continue
> your quest for actual results;
> instead of, expected results.
> But keep in mind, making the measurements
> is not something most business can do not all
> long less to any degree of accuracy or precision
> (Perhaps we are expected to believe
> that is what a CRM enables one to do.)

> Meanwhile, I'm left suspecting that many companies
> would simply ignore the information coming from
> such a system regardless of how much many they spent.
> After all, if it were any good, it would end up telling
> them something they already know.

> Ie. how much money do companies need to spend
> on a system before doing something about things
> like the following.

> Opps,
> considering the amount of traffic in the newsgroup
> the thread will already be a long way down by now
> so I'll switch to making some brief mentions.

> ----

> Telling customer incorrect instructions
> for opening and funding an account
> (especially if those incorrect instructions
> are possibly unlawful or at costly to the customer).

> Failing to allow customer to login with correct passwords.

> Failing to mail customer passwords,
> whenever you say you are (multiple times).

> Whenever the customer calls in saying
> the passwords have still not arrived,
> assure the customer the passwords are in the mail.
> And then later when the customer calls in again
> saying the passwords have still not arrived,
> telling the customer the passwords
> are held up at the printers.
> (How can they be in the mail
> if they have not be printed?)

> Failing to address security problems
> whenever reported by the customer.

> Leaving customer locked out of accounts for months.

> Failing to rollover the funds from the rollover account
> to the roth account during all those months.
> (The funds should have been rolled over per the
> appropriate sections of the account applications.)

> Failing to mail customer blank new account application form
> whenever you say you are (multiple times).

> Dude saying he is a vice-president,
> telling the customer all the same excuses
> about why the customer's passwords wouldn't work.
> Such as, our records show you changed your password.
> (Recall, I did change them and used them several times
> watching for the funds).

> Dude saying he is a vice-president,
> telling the customer it is company policy that
> the above problems do *not* go to the company president.

> Ponder: Why would a company have such a policy?

> ---

> Being mean to the customer trying to get them
> to go away instead of (I guess sometimes in addition to)
> addressing the problems with your product.

> Whenever a customer calls in about problems
> with your ASPI TWAIN driver, tell the customer
> to use the STI TWAIN driver.
> *AND*
> Tell the customer to use the ASPI TWAIN driver
> whenever they call in about problems with
> the STI TWAIN driver.

> Giving the customer your word that the
> dishonorable behavior will be address,
> but then go on to repeat the dishonorable
> behavior yourself.

> Giving your word to the customer that their
> questions will be answered and then
> fail to contact the customer at all.

> Giving your word to the customer that the
> problems will be fix and then later telling the
> customer you are under no obligation to fix the problems.

> Most every time the customer contacts
> your company about problems they have
> already reported, play like you are confused
> about what version of the product the
> customer is using and tell them to download
> another version (even playing like this is the first
> time the problem is being reported -- again).

> Be mean to the customer for a long period of time,
> before finally wanting to "try to reproduce" the problem,
> but insist on using some new version that was just
> released instead the version that is reported to have the problem.

> When the customer reports a problem,
> and ask if the company considers
> the current behavior to be TWAIN compliant or not,
> tell the customer you will have someone
> contact them to discuss the issue,
> but fail to ever contact the customer.

> When the customer reports they have not
> been contacted, tell the customer to
> continue to bring their questions to you;
> yet, never provide the customer with an answer
> to the question they have already asked.

> When the customer reports their question
> is still unanswered and mentions it would be
> appropriate to receive the company's answer
> to the question before contacting the TWAIN
> organization for clarification,
> tell the customer your company will contact
> the TWAIN organization.
> Further more, never:
> - give the customer an answer to the question
> - notify the customer a request for clarification has been made.
> - give the customer a copy of the clarification.

> Let see, the vendor did send me something
> written by the TWAIN organization.
> It appears to be page 1-4 of the TWAIN specification
> with the following items highlighted.

> #1
> "Key elements of the TWAIN implementation "belong" in the operating
> system. The agreement between Microsoft and the TWAIN Working Group
> indicates
> that this integration into the operating system is beginning."

> #2
> "Allow an application vendor to make their application TWAIN compliant
> with a reasonable amount of development and testing effort."

> Could #1 have anything to do with the fact that this guy
> yells STI every time I mention *anything* about ASPI
> and could that have to do with the fact that one of
> the problems I've reported I said I saw under ASPI but not STI?
> (As if that were the only problem I've reported.)
> Furthermore, what about the vendor's failure to even provide
> information needed when working with the STI driver.

> Could #2 be contradictory?

> This highlight #2 is coming from a guy that has told me:
> It sounds like you use TWAIN quite a lot,
> have you ever consider joining the TWAIN organization?

> To see the contradication, consider:
> What is my experience using TWAIN?
> Our customers complained they could
> no longer control the scan operation.
> Our programmer for the scanning portion of our application
> was unable to resolve what the problem was
> even after having calling the scanner vendor.
> So I was ask to take a look. Sadly, my conclusion was:
> "The reason you cannot control the scan operation
> is because you do not have control!"
> Perhaps, you can guess what happened next.
> I am charged with the task of getting our
> application (back) in control of the scan operation.
> Sadly, it is taking much effort due to the
> dishonorable behavior of the vendor.
> So much effort that the vendor considers
> I use TWAIN quite a lot; which is sad,
> considering the majority of my experience
> with TWAIN amounts to trying to get the vendor to
> fix and support their product.

> Futhermore let's consider does reasonable effort include:
> -doing things that the vendor
> is unwilling and/or unable to document?
> -doing things that the vendor's own software engineer
> is unable to figure out how to do?
> -having to figure out (without documentation) all sorts
> of things ranging from what files will the driver read/write
> to the state represented by the setting/getting of the standard
> twain settings may not apply to the upcoming scan, etc?

> (in the style of the rest of the post)

> Taking pride in your companies ability
> to save infomation somewhere other then
> the ini file you have told developers
> you will save information in.
> Futhermore, there is no documentation telling
> developers what ini files the drivers will use.

> Failing to tell the customer now an application
> can determine which ini filenames to use.

> Failing to tell the customer now an application
> can determine which section filenames to use
> (for ini files nor custom data).

> Honestly, I am not making this up.
> Is this really reasonable effort?

> Telling the customer something cannot be done
> and then telling the customer that is the recommended way.

> Telling the customer to use the device name
> in step in a process
> to figure out what the device name is.

> Asking the customer to send you a sample program,
> because you can not figure out how to call the
> routine the customer is reporting a problem with;
> especially whenever, your company does NOT provide developers
> with any documention (long less examples) other
> than the TWAIN specification; especially whenever,
> the routine in question is for vendor specific data.

> (end of "Could #2")

> Gee, I am only trying to mention some of them.
> Let me stop with two more:

> Sending the customer a document marked confidential
> that does not (and should not) contain the information
> the customer needs. At least it was ok for me to receive
> confidential information, but that does not make it ok
> to send it out.

> Telling the customer to not contact Japan because
> everyone

...

read more »



Mon, 08 Aug 2005 15:14:45 GMT  
 
 [ 13 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. Numbering the values in a Top 10 query from 1 to 10

2. 10 mb file needs to be reduced by 2k w/o rewriting the whole thing

3. SElECT TOP 10 return 11 records ?

4. Top 10 - Information Systems

5. Top 10 Signs you Need an Information System!

6. Top 10 Signs you Need an Information System!

7. TOP 10 Question

8. Top 10 question: masked edit?

9. Needed - 10 good (wo)men with PB3.2

10. Top 10 list for "things I want to do in WSH"

11. 10 out of 10 to Mr. Doug Robbins - Creating a userform

12. 10 out of 10 to Mr. Doug Robbins - Creating a userform

 

 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software