What's a "Web Beacon"? 
Author Message
 What's a "Web Beacon"?

I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ... what are they
and how do they work?

--------------------
Use of Web Beacons

MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web beacons - sometimes
called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who have visited
those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include web beacons
in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to count how many
messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not used to access
your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of sites and
services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated statistics about
MSN Web site usage.

Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including a cookie
number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the page on which
the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web beacons placed
there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN determine the
effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 00:15:42 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
they call them web beacons, i call them bugs. if i have a web server (wich
i do) and on that web server i have a website (no duh) in that site, i can
place a 1 by 1 pixel image like a gif or jpg. now, if i wanted to get your
ip address or just confirm that you received an email from me, all i have
to do is send you and email containing a reference to that image on my
site. when you receive that email, and open it, if you have an html enabled
email program, the email will have to retrieve that image from my site in
order to display it to you. you probably wont notice it since it's 1 by 1
(rather small) and i would make sure it is the same color as the
backgroound of my message to you. now that it has retrieved that image from
my site, i can look at my web servers logs to see if that image was
retrieved, and it will show me your ip address. the fact that it was
retrieved is enough to tell me that you got my message. it is really good
for forwarding stuff, as in, if i didn't want you to forward an email
message because it was private, i can inspect my logs to see if a different
ip address gets the image. that would tell me that you betrayed my trust.
also, if my website places cookies on your drive, i can make even more use
of this info, like share it with spammers, track your shopping habbits, all
sorts of {*filter*} little spy activity. :-( You can probably tell from my words
that i dissaprove of these tactics...ok folks, let the flames begin. ;-)

--
Dr.X


Quote:
> I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ... what are
they
> and how do they work?

> --------------------
> Use of Web Beacons

> MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web beacons -
sometimes
> called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who have visited
> those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include web
beacons
> in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to count how
many
> messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not used to
access
> your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of sites and
> services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated statistics
about
> MSN Web site usage.

> Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including a cookie
> number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the page on
which
> the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web beacons placed
> there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN determine the
> effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 00:46:18 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
Web beacons are basically a way to get around browsers that scripts and/or
cookies disabled, but still let you log some information.  Basically, you
place an IMG tag on your page with a Height and Width of 1 and the SRC
points to some file (most likely an ASP with Server Side execution in this
case), which you then use to grab browser information submitted by the
clients connection and catalog it to a database.

Some anonymous/privacy advocates really hate this type of tracking because
its difficult, if not impossible, to filter (How do you distinguish between
a valid graphic and a Web Beacon?).  Of course, all it really takes is a
browser that won't supply the information to the server.

-K


Quote:
> I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ... what are
they
> and how do they work?

> --------------------
> Use of Web Beacons

> MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web beacons -
sometimes
> called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who have visited
> those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include web
beacons
> in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to count how
many
> messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not used to
access
> your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of sites and
> services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated statistics
about
> MSN Web site usage.

> Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including a cookie
> number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the page on
which
> the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web beacons placed
> there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN determine the
> effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 00:46:07 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
wow, I was sure there were some scripters in this ng that would defend the
use of these underhanded, unscrupulous, dirty little tricks. It's nice to
know we're all on the same page.  :-)

--
Dr.X


Quote:
> they call them web beacons, i call them bugs. if i have a web server
(wich
> i do) and on that web server i have a website (no duh) in that site, i
can
> place a 1 by 1 pixel image like a gif or jpg. now, if i wanted to get
your
> ip address or just confirm that you received an email from me, all i have
> to do is send you and email containing a reference to that image on my
> site. when you receive that email, and open it, if you have an html
enabled
> email program, the email will have to retrieve that image from my site in
> order to display it to you. you probably wont notice it since it's 1 by 1
> (rather small) and i would make sure it is the same color as the
> backgroound of my message to you. now that it has retrieved that image
from
> my site, i can look at my web servers logs to see if that image was
> retrieved, and it will show me your ip address. the fact that it was
> retrieved is enough to tell me that you got my message. it is really good
> for forwarding stuff, as in, if i didn't want you to forward an email
> message because it was private, i can inspect my logs to see if a
different
> ip address gets the image. that would tell me that you betrayed my trust.
> also, if my website places cookies on your drive, i can make even more
use
> of this info, like share it with spammers, track your shopping habbits,
all
> sorts of {*filter*} little spy activity. :-( You can probably tell from my
words
> that i dissaprove of these tactics...ok folks, let the flames begin. ;-)

> --
> Dr.X



> > I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ... what are
> they
> > and how do they work?

> > --------------------
> > Use of Web Beacons

> > MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web beacons -
> sometimes
> > called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who have
visited
> > those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include web
> beacons
> > in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to count how
> many
> > messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not used to
> access
> > your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of sites
and
> > services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated statistics
> about
> > MSN Web site usage.

> > Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including a
cookie
> > number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the page on
> which
> > the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web beacons
placed
> > there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN determine the
> > effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 01:22:47 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
tsk...
Glad I forward plain-text...
Quote:

> wow, I was sure there were some scripters in this ng that would defend the
> use of these underhanded, unscrupulous, dirty little tricks. It's nice to
> know we're all on the same page.  :-)

> --
> Dr.X



> > they call them web beacons, i call them bugs. if i have a web server
> (wich
> > i do) and on that web server i have a website (no duh) in that site, i
> can
> > place a 1 by 1 pixel image like a gif or jpg. now, if i wanted to get
> your
> > ip address or just confirm that you received an email from me, all i have
> > to do is send you and email containing a reference to that image on my
> > site. when you receive that email, and open it, if you have an html
> enabled
> > email program, the email will have to retrieve that image from my site in
> > order to display it to you. you probably wont notice it since it's 1 by 1
> > (rather small) and i would make sure it is the same color as the
> > backgroound of my message to you. now that it has retrieved that image
> from
> > my site, i can look at my web servers logs to see if that image was
> > retrieved, and it will show me your ip address. the fact that it was
> > retrieved is enough to tell me that you got my message. it is really good
> > for forwarding stuff, as in, if i didn't want you to forward an email
> > message because it was private, i can inspect my logs to see if a
> different
> > ip address gets the image. that would tell me that you betrayed my trust.
> > also, if my website places cookies on your drive, i can make even more
> use
> > of this info, like share it with spammers, track your shopping habbits,
> all
> > sorts of {*filter*} little spy activity. :-( You can probably tell from my
> words
> > that i dissaprove of these tactics...ok folks, let the flames begin. ;-)

> > --
> > Dr.X



> > > I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ... what are
> > they
> > > and how do they work?

> > > --------------------
> > > Use of Web Beacons

> > > MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web beacons -
> > sometimes
> > > called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who have
> visited
> > > those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include web
> > beacons
> > > in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to count how
> > many
> > > messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not used to
> > access
> > > your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of sites
> and
> > > services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated statistics
> > about
> > > MSN Web site usage.

> > > Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including a
> cookie
> > > number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the page on
> > which
> > > the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web beacons
> placed
> > > there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN determine the
> > > effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 01:54:48 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
I sure am... makes me sick thinking of all the talent going to waste.

: wow, I was sure there were some scripters in this ng that would defend the
: use of these underhanded, unscrupulous, dirty little tricks. It's nice to
: know we're all on the same page.  :-)
:
: --
: Dr.X
:

: > they call them web beacons, i call them bugs. if i have a web server
: (wich
: > i do) and on that web server i have a website (no duh) in that site, i
: can
: > place a 1 by 1 pixel image like a gif or jpg. now, if i wanted to get
: your
: > ip address or just confirm that you received an email from me, all i have
: > to do is send you and email containing a reference to that image on my
: > site. when you receive that email, and open it, if you have an html
: enabled
: > email program, the email will have to retrieve that image from my site in
: > order to display it to you. you probably wont notice it since it's 1 by 1
: > (rather small) and i would make sure it is the same color as the
: > backgroound of my message to you. now that it has retrieved that image
: from
: > my site, i can look at my web servers logs to see if that image was
: > retrieved, and it will show me your ip address. the fact that it was
: > retrieved is enough to tell me that you got my message. it is really good
: > for forwarding stuff, as in, if i didn't want you to forward an email
: > message because it was private, i can inspect my logs to see if a
: different
: > ip address gets the image. that would tell me that you betrayed my trust.
: > also, if my website places cookies on your drive, i can make even more
: use
: > of this info, like share it with spammers, track your shopping habbits,
: all
: > sorts of {*filter*} little spy activity. :-( You can probably tell from my
: words
: > that i dissaprove of these tactics...ok folks, let the flames begin. ;-)
: >
: > --
: > Dr.X
: >
: >


: > > I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ... what are
: > they
: > > and how do they work?
: > >
: > > --------------------
: > > Use of Web Beacons
: > >
: > > MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web beacons -
: > sometimes
: > > called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who have
: visited
: > > those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include web
: > beacons
: > > in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to count how
: > many
: > > messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not used to
: > access
: > > your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of sites
: and
: > > services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated statistics
: > about
: > > MSN Web site usage.
: > >
: > > Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including a
: cookie
: > > number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the page on
: > which
: > > the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web beacons
: placed
: > > there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN determine the
: > > effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.
: > >
: > >
: > >
: > >
: >
: >
: >
:
:



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 02:25:32 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
Okayk, the email angle makes a whole lot of sense to me. No, I don't condone
it at all ... but I see how it all clicks together now. Hm. There's a lot to
be said for not having a HTML enabled browser, isn't there? Crafty little
{*filter*} whoever originally thought up this one.



Quote:
> I sure am... makes me sick thinking of all the talent going to waste.




Quote:
> : wow, I was sure there were some scripters in this ng that would defend
the
> : use of these underhanded, unscrupulous, dirty little tricks. It's nice
to
> : know we're all on the same page.  :-)
> :
> : --
> : Dr.X
> :


> : > they call them web beacons, i call them bugs. if i have a web server
> : (wich
> : > i do) and on that web server i have a website (no duh) in that site, i
> : can
> : > place a 1 by 1 pixel image like a gif or jpg. now, if i wanted to get
> : your
> : > ip address or just confirm that you received an email from me, all i
have
> : > to do is send you and email containing a reference to that image on my
> : > site. when you receive that email, and open it, if you have an html
> : enabled
> : > email program, the email will have to retrieve that image from my site
in
> : > order to display it to you. you probably wont notice it since it's 1
by 1
> : > (rather small) and i would make sure it is the same color as the
> : > backgroound of my message to you. now that it has retrieved that image
> : from
> : > my site, i can look at my web servers logs to see if that image was
> : > retrieved, and it will show me your ip address. the fact that it was
> : > retrieved is enough to tell me that you got my message. it is really
good
> : > for forwarding stuff, as in, if i didn't want you to forward an email
> : > message because it was private, i can inspect my logs to see if a
> : different
> : > ip address gets the image. that would tell me that you betrayed my
trust.
> : > also, if my website places cookies on your drive, i can make even more
> : use
> : > of this info, like share it with spammers, track your shopping
habbits,
> : all
> : > sorts of {*filter*} little spy activity. :-( You can probably tell from my
> : words
> : > that i dissaprove of these tactics...ok folks, let the flames begin.
;-)
> : >
> : > --
> : > Dr.X
> : >
> : >


> : > > I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ... what
are
> : > they
> : > > and how do they work?
> : > >
> : > > --------------------
> : > > Use of Web Beacons
> : > >
> : > > MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web beacons -
> : > sometimes
> : > > called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who have
> : visited
> : > > those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include web
> : > beacons
> : > > in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to count
how
> : > many
> : > > messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not used
to
> : > access
> : > > your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of sites
> : and
> : > > services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated
statistics
> : > about
> : > > MSN Web site usage.
> : > >
> : > > Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including a
> : cookie
> : > > number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the page
on
> : > which
> : > > the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web beacons
> : placed
> : > > there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN determine
the
> : > > effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.
> : > >
> : > >
> : > >
> : > >
> : >
> : >
> : >
> :
> :



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 02:58:59 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
one quick and dirty way I found to get around some of the bugs when using
outlook is to download all email for off line viewing. sometimes you'll
notice while viewing the email, outlook wants to log you back on to the
net. if that happens, then you know that a graphic (or some component) in
that message needs to be retrieved from a server some where. now that don't
always mean it;s a bug. sometimes a company that has to send out a lot of
email would prefer all the graphics to be on their web server rather than
tie up their email server by making it send megs or even gigs of graphics
in the messages. if you have a really large client base that gets a
newsletter, say 250 thousand users, you wouldn't want to send large
graphics to all of them all at once. you could just keep the pics on the
web and let the web server handle the load. it would be spread out over
time since not all the recipients is likely to open their mail at the same
time. anyway, you can see the advantages and disadvantages in this method.
unfortunately, the technique was twisted around for use by spammers and
spyware. :-(

--
Dr.X

Quote:
> Okayk, the email angle makes a whole lot of sense to me. No, I don't
condone
> it at all ... but I see how it all clicks together now. Hm. There's a lot
to
> be said for not having a HTML enabled browser, isn't there? Crafty little
> {*filter*} whoever originally thought up this one.



> > I sure am... makes me sick thinking of all the talent going to waste.



> > : wow, I was sure there were some scripters in this ng that would
defend
> the
> > : use of these underhanded, unscrupulous, dirty little tricks. It's
nice
> to
> > : know we're all on the same page.  :-)
> > :
> > : --
> > : Dr.X
> > :


> > : > they call them web beacons, i call them bugs. if i have a web
server
> > : (wich
> > : > i do) and on that web server i have a website (no duh) in that
site, i
> > : can
> > : > place a 1 by 1 pixel image like a gif or jpg. now, if i wanted to
get
> > : your
> > : > ip address or just confirm that you received an email from me, all
i
> have
> > : > to do is send you and email containing a reference to that image on
my
> > : > site. when you receive that email, and open it, if you have an html
> > : enabled
> > : > email program, the email will have to retrieve that image from my
site
> in
> > : > order to display it to you. you probably wont notice it since it's
1
> by 1
> > : > (rather small) and i would make sure it is the same color as the
> > : > backgroound of my message to you. now that it has retrieved that
image
> > : from
> > : > my site, i can look at my web servers logs to see if that image was
> > : > retrieved, and it will show me your ip address. the fact that it
was
> > : > retrieved is enough to tell me that you got my message. it is
really
> good
> > : > for forwarding stuff, as in, if i didn't want you to forward an
email
> > : > message because it was private, i can inspect my logs to see if a
> > : different
> > : > ip address gets the image. that would tell me that you betrayed my
> trust.
> > : > also, if my website places cookies on your drive, i can make even
more
> > : use
> > : > of this info, like share it with spammers, track your shopping
> habbits,
> > : all
> > : > sorts of {*filter*} little spy activity. :-( You can probably tell from
my
> > : words
> > : > that i dissaprove of these tactics...ok folks, let the flames
begin.
> ;-)
> > : >
> > : > --
> > : > Dr.X
> > : >
> > : >


> > : > > I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ...
what
> are
> > : > they
> > : > > and how do they work?
> > : > >
> > : > > --------------------
> > : > > Use of Web Beacons
> > : > >
> > : > > MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web
beacons -
> > : > sometimes
> > : > > called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who have
> > : visited
> > : > > those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include
web
> > : > beacons
> > : > > in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to
count
> how
> > : > many
> > : > > messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not
used
> to
> > : > access
> > : > > your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of
sites
> > : and
> > : > > services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated
> statistics
> > : > about
> > : > > MSN Web site usage.
> > : > >
> > : > > Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including a
> > : cookie
> > : > > number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the
page
> on
> > : > which
> > : > > the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web
beacons
> > : placed
> > : > > there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN determine
> the
> > : > > effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.
> > : > >
> > : > >
> > : > >
> > : > >
> > : >
> > : >
> > : >
> > :
> > :



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 03:17:48 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
I've gotten so annoyed with the redirects and secondary ads that I finally just started maintaining a huge HOSTS file on my machine.  I have a large file I've downloaded of known ad/spy sites, which just remaps their host names to 0.0.0.0, and I add the ones I find on my own. Works quite nicely too.

The other trick I've seen is to use a Linux proxy server at home.  You have to know something to set them up, but you can actually filter content while it's coming through.  I seem to have heard about someone doing a check for single-pixel images and using the Linux proxy to actually filter those out specifically, too.

Quote:

> one quick and dirty way I found to get around some of the bugs when using
> outlook is to download all email for off line viewing. sometimes you'll
> notice while viewing the email, outlook wants to log you back on to the
> net. if that happens, then you know that a graphic (or some component) in
> that message needs to be retrieved from a server some where. now that don't
> always mean it;s a bug. sometimes a company that has to send out a lot of
> email would prefer all the graphics to be on their web server rather than
> tie up their email server by making it send megs or even gigs of graphics
> in the messages. if you have a really large client base that gets a
> newsletter, say 250 thousand users, you wouldn't want to send large
> graphics to all of them all at once. you could just keep the pics on the
> web and let the web server handle the load. it would be spread out over
> time since not all the recipients is likely to open their mail at the same
> time. anyway, you can see the advantages and disadvantages in this method.
> unfortunately, the technique was twisted around for use by spammers and
> spyware. :-(

> --
> Dr.X


> > Okayk, the email angle makes a whole lot of sense to me. No, I don't
> condone
> > it at all ... but I see how it all clicks together now. Hm. There's a lot
> to
> > be said for not having a HTML enabled browser, isn't there? Crafty little
> > {*filter*} whoever originally thought up this one.



> > > I sure am... makes me sick thinking of all the talent going to waste.



> > > : wow, I was sure there were some scripters in this ng that would
> defend
> > the
> > > : use of these underhanded, unscrupulous, dirty little tricks. It's
> nice
> > to
> > > : know we're all on the same page.  :-)
> > > :
> > > : --
> > > : Dr.X
> > > :


> > > : > they call them web beacons, i call them bugs. if i have a web
> server
> > > : (wich
> > > : > i do) and on that web server i have a website (no duh) in that
> site, i
> > > : can
> > > : > place a 1 by 1 pixel image like a gif or jpg. now, if i wanted to
> get
> > > : your
> > > : > ip address or just confirm that you received an email from me, all
> i
> > have
> > > : > to do is send you and email containing a reference to that image on
> my
> > > : > site. when you receive that email, and open it, if you have an html
> > > : enabled
> > > : > email program, the email will have to retrieve that image from my
> site
> > in
> > > : > order to display it to you. you probably wont notice it since it's
> 1
> > by 1
> > > : > (rather small) and i would make sure it is the same color as the
> > > : > backgroound of my message to you. now that it has retrieved that
> image
> > > : from
> > > : > my site, i can look at my web servers logs to see if that image was
> > > : > retrieved, and it will show me your ip address. the fact that it
> was
> > > : > retrieved is enough to tell me that you got my message. it is
> really
> > good
> > > : > for forwarding stuff, as in, if i didn't want you to forward an
> email
> > > : > message because it was private, i can inspect my logs to see if a
> > > : different
> > > : > ip address gets the image. that would tell me that you betrayed my
> > trust.
> > > : > also, if my website places cookies on your drive, i can make even
> more
> > > : use
> > > : > of this info, like share it with spammers, track your shopping
> > habbits,
> > > : all
> > > : > sorts of {*filter*} little spy activity. :-( You can probably tell from
> my
> > > : words
> > > : > that i dissaprove of these tactics...ok folks, let the flames
> begin.
> > ;-)
> > > : >
> > > : > --
> > > : > Dr.X
> > > : >
> > > : >


> > > : > > I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ...
> what
> > are
> > > : > they
> > > : > > and how do they work?
> > > : > >
> > > : > > --------------------
> > > : > > Use of Web Beacons
> > > : > >
> > > : > > MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web
> beacons -
> > > : > sometimes
> > > : > > called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who have
> > > : visited
> > > : > > those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include
> web
> > > : > beacons
> > > : > > in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to
> count
> > how
> > > : > many
> > > : > > messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not
> used
> > to
> > > : > access
> > > : > > your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of
> sites
> > > : and
> > > : > > services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated
> > statistics
> > > : > about
> > > : > > MSN Web site usage.
> > > : > >
> > > : > > Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including a
> > > : cookie
> > > : > > number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the
> page
> > on
> > > : > which
> > > : > > the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web
> beacons
> > > : placed
> > > : > > there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN determine
> > the
> > > : > > effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.
> > > : > >
> > > : > >
> > > : > >
> > > : > >
> > > : >
> > > : >
> > > : >
> > > :
> > > :



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 04:56:25 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
not a bad idea to use the hosts file. maybe someone should set up a server
some where on the web that could share that file for everyone, auto
download it everytime you log to the web, and auto add to it when ever some
one finds a new line to add to it. (probably way too much.)

filtering for the single pixle isn't bad but it's not always a sinlge
pixel. most {*filter*} spammers just use the graphic they send with the mail.
{*filter*} jane is probably a web bug to tell them that they hit a real email
address. it would be a simple matter of associating the address with a
directory. when it gets accessed, bingo - found a real email address.

--
Dr.X
"Alex K. Angelopoulos" <alex_angelopoulos_at_hotmail_dot_com_remove__>

I've gotten so annoyed with the redirects and secondary ads that I finally
just started maintaining a huge HOSTS file on my machine.  I have a large
file I've downloaded of known ad/spy sites, which just remaps their host
names to 0.0.0.0, and I add the ones I find on my own. Works quite nicely
too.

The other trick I've seen is to use a Linux proxy server at home.  You have
to know something to set them up, but you can actually filter content while
it's coming through.  I seem to have heard about someone doing a check for
single-pixel images and using the Linux proxy to actually filter those out
specifically, too.


Quote:
> one quick and dirty way I found to get around some of the bugs when using
> outlook is to download all email for off line viewing. sometimes you'll
> notice while viewing the email, outlook wants to log you back on to the
> net. if that happens, then you know that a graphic (or some component) in
> that message needs to be retrieved from a server some where. now that
don't
> always mean it;s a bug. sometimes a company that has to send out a lot of
> email would prefer all the graphics to be on their web server rather than
> tie up their email server by making it send megs or even gigs of graphics
> in the messages. if you have a really large client base that gets a
> newsletter, say 250 thousand users, you wouldn't want to send large
> graphics to all of them all at once. you could just keep the pics on the
> web and let the web server handle the load. it would be spread out over
> time since not all the recipients is likely to open their mail at the
same
> time. anyway, you can see the advantages and disadvantages in this
method.
> unfortunately, the technique was twisted around for use by spammers and
> spyware. :-(

> --
> Dr.X


> > Okayk, the email angle makes a whole lot of sense to me. No, I don't
> condone
> > it at all ... but I see how it all clicks together now. Hm. There's a
lot
> to
> > be said for not having a HTML enabled browser, isn't there? Crafty
little
> > {*filter*} whoever originally thought up this one.



> > > I sure am... makes me sick thinking of all the talent going to waste.



> > > : wow, I was sure there were some scripters in this ng that would
> defend
> > the
> > > : use of these underhanded, unscrupulous, dirty little tricks. It's
> nice
> > to
> > > : know we're all on the same page.  :-)
> > > :
> > > : --
> > > : Dr.X
> > > :


> > > : > they call them web beacons, i call them bugs. if i have a web
> server
> > > : (wich
> > > : > i do) and on that web server i have a website (no duh) in that
> site, i
> > > : can
> > > : > place a 1 by 1 pixel image like a gif or jpg. now, if i wanted to
> get
> > > : your
> > > : > ip address or just confirm that you received an email from me,
all
> i
> > have
> > > : > to do is send you and email containing a reference to that image
on
> my
> > > : > site. when you receive that email, and open it, if you have an
html
> > > : enabled
> > > : > email program, the email will have to retrieve that image from my
> site
> > in
> > > : > order to display it to you. you probably wont notice it since
it's
> 1
> > by 1
> > > : > (rather small) and i would make sure it is the same color as the
> > > : > backgroound of my message to you. now that it has retrieved that
> image
> > > : from
> > > : > my site, i can look at my web servers logs to see if that image
was
> > > : > retrieved, and it will show me your ip address. the fact that it
> was
> > > : > retrieved is enough to tell me that you got my message. it is
> really
> > good
> > > : > for forwarding stuff, as in, if i didn't want you to forward an
> email
> > > : > message because it was private, i can inspect my logs to see if a
> > > : different
> > > : > ip address gets the image. that would tell me that you betrayed
my
> > trust.
> > > : > also, if my website places cookies on your drive, i can make even
> more
> > > : use
> > > : > of this info, like share it with spammers, track your shopping
> > habbits,
> > > : all
> > > : > sorts of {*filter*} little spy activity. :-( You can probably tell
from
> my
> > > : words
> > > : > that i dissaprove of these tactics...ok folks, let the flames
> begin.
> > ;-)
> > > : >
> > > : > --
> > > : > Dr.X
> > > : >
> > > : >


> > > : > > I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ...
> what
> > are
> > > : > they
> > > : > > and how do they work?
> > > : > >
> > > : > > --------------------
> > > : > > Use of Web Beacons
> > > : > >
> > > : > > MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web
> beacons -
> > > : > sometimes
> > > : > > called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who
have
> > > : visited
> > > : > > those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include
> web
> > > : > beacons
> > > : > > in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to
> count
> > how
> > > : > many
> > > : > > messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not
> used
> > to
> > > : > access
> > > : > > your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of
> sites
> > > : and
> > > : > > services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated
> > statistics
> > > : > about
> > > : > > MSN Web site usage.
> > > : > >
> > > : > > Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including
a
> > > : cookie
> > > : > > number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the
> page
> > on
> > > : > which
> > > : > > the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web
> beacons
> > > : placed
> > > : > > there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN
determine
> > the
> > > : > > effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.
> > > : > >
> > > : > >
> > > : > >
> > > : > >
> > > : >
> > > : >
> > > : >
> > > :
> > > :



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 05:07:45 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
And the kicker of it all is - how many of those emails actually get *read*?

It seems people are working harder and harder at producing spam and I can't see that it ever pays.  It does cost money between the bandwidth consumption and -even more significant - the time people have to spend filtering.  IMO, the biggest threat to freedom of communication right now isn't any government or ideology - it's spam.  

Quote:

> not a bad idea to use the hosts file. maybe someone should set up a server
> some where on the web that could share that file for everyone, auto
> download it everytime you log to the web, and auto add to it when ever some
> one finds a new line to add to it. (probably way too much.)

> filtering for the single pixle isn't bad but it's not always a sinlge
> pixel. most {*filter*} spammers just use the graphic they send with the mail.
> {*filter*} jane is probably a web bug to tell them that they hit a real email
> address. it would be a simple matter of associating the address with a
> directory. when it gets accessed, bingo - found a real email address.

> --
> Dr.X
> "Alex K. Angelopoulos" <alex_angelopoulos_at_hotmail_dot_com_remove__>

> I've gotten so annoyed with the redirects and secondary ads that I finally
> just started maintaining a huge HOSTS file on my machine.  I have a large
> file I've downloaded of known ad/spy sites, which just remaps their host
> names to 0.0.0.0, and I add the ones I find on my own. Works quite nicely
> too.

> The other trick I've seen is to use a Linux proxy server at home.  You have
> to know something to set them up, but you can actually filter content while
> it's coming through.  I seem to have heard about someone doing a check for
> single-pixel images and using the Linux proxy to actually filter those out
> specifically, too.



> > one quick and dirty way I found to get around some of the bugs when using
> > outlook is to download all email for off line viewing. sometimes you'll
> > notice while viewing the email, outlook wants to log you back on to the
> > net. if that happens, then you know that a graphic (or some component) in
> > that message needs to be retrieved from a server some where. now that
> don't
> > always mean it;s a bug. sometimes a company that has to send out a lot of
> > email would prefer all the graphics to be on their web server rather than
> > tie up their email server by making it send megs or even gigs of graphics
> > in the messages. if you have a really large client base that gets a
> > newsletter, say 250 thousand users, you wouldn't want to send large
> > graphics to all of them all at once. you could just keep the pics on the
> > web and let the web server handle the load. it would be spread out over
> > time since not all the recipients is likely to open their mail at the
> same
> > time. anyway, you can see the advantages and disadvantages in this
> method.
> > unfortunately, the technique was twisted around for use by spammers and
> > spyware. :-(

> > --
> > Dr.X


> > > Okayk, the email angle makes a whole lot of sense to me. No, I don't
> > condone
> > > it at all ... but I see how it all clicks together now. Hm. There's a
> lot
> > to
> > > be said for not having a HTML enabled browser, isn't there? Crafty
> little
> > > {*filter*} whoever originally thought up this one.



> > > > I sure am... makes me sick thinking of all the talent going to waste.



> > > > : wow, I was sure there were some scripters in this ng that would
> > defend
> > > the
> > > > : use of these underhanded, unscrupulous, dirty little tricks. It's
> > nice
> > > to
> > > > : know we're all on the same page.  :-)
> > > > :
> > > > : --
> > > > : Dr.X
> > > > :


> > > > : > they call them web beacons, i call them bugs. if i have a web
> > server
> > > > : (wich
> > > > : > i do) and on that web server i have a website (no duh) in that
> > site, i
> > > > : can
> > > > : > place a 1 by 1 pixel image like a gif or jpg. now, if i wanted to
> > get
> > > > : your
> > > > : > ip address or just confirm that you received an email from me,
> all
> > i
> > > have
> > > > : > to do is send you and email containing a reference to that image
> on
> > my
> > > > : > site. when you receive that email, and open it, if you have an
> html
> > > > : enabled
> > > > : > email program, the email will have to retrieve that image from my
> > site
> > > in
> > > > : > order to display it to you. you probably wont notice it since
> it's
> > 1
> > > by 1
> > > > : > (rather small) and i would make sure it is the same color as the
> > > > : > backgroound of my message to you. now that it has retrieved that
> > image
> > > > : from
> > > > : > my site, i can look at my web servers logs to see if that image
> was
> > > > : > retrieved, and it will show me your ip address. the fact that it
> > was
> > > > : > retrieved is enough to tell me that you got my message. it is
> > really
> > > good
> > > > : > for forwarding stuff, as in, if i didn't want you to forward an
> > email
> > > > : > message because it was private, i can inspect my logs to see if a
> > > > : different
> > > > : > ip address gets the image. that would tell me that you betrayed
> my
> > > trust.
> > > > : > also, if my website places cookies on your drive, i can make even
> > more
> > > > : use
> > > > : > of this info, like share it with spammers, track your shopping
> > > habbits,
> > > > : all
> > > > : > sorts of {*filter*} little spy activity. :-( You can probably tell
> from
> > my
> > > > : words
> > > > : > that i dissaprove of these tactics...ok folks, let the flames
> > begin.
> > > ;-)
> > > > : >
> > > > : > --
> > > > : > Dr.X
> > > > : >
> > > > : >


> > > > : > > I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ...
> > what
> > > are
> > > > : > they
> > > > : > > and how do they work?
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > > --------------------
> > > > : > > Use of Web Beacons
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > > MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web
> > beacons -
> > > > : > sometimes
> > > > : > > called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who
> have
> > > > : visited
> > > > : > > those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include
> > web
> > > > : > beacons
> > > > : > > in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to
> > count
> > > how
> > > > : > many
> > > > : > > messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not
> > used
> > > to
> > > > : > access
> > > > : > > your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of
> > sites
> > > > : and
> > > > : > > services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated
> > > statistics
> > > > : > about
> > > > : > > MSN Web site usage.
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > > Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including
> a
> > > > : cookie
> > > > : > > number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the
> > page
> > > on
> > > > : > which
> > > > : > > the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web
> > beacons
> > > > : placed
> > > > : > > there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN
> determine
> > > the
> > > > : > > effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > >
> > > > : >
> > > > : >
> > > > : >
> > > > :
> > > > :



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 05:21:27 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
100% agreement here. we WILL loose web freedoms due to that kind of
activity. there is no doubt about it. in this case, and ONLY this case, I
can see where government intervention could be of some use. actually, I
would welcome it. to actually make {*filter*} spammers do JAIL time if my 10 year
old daughter finds that trash in her mail box would send a message faster
than email to all the other spammers.

I must apologize for all my rantings. when you deal with large networks
everyday for a living, you start to build a lot of resentment for those
that abuse the PRIVILEGE of using the net. I guess the OP set off my other
personality. not that it was a bad question, but i got reminded and i
havn't had my meds yet.  :-)

--
Dr.X
"Alex K. Angelopoulos" <alex_angelopoulos_at_hotmail_dot_com_remove__>

And the kicker of it all is - how many of those emails actually get *read*?

It seems people are working harder and harder at producing spam and I can't
see that it ever pays.  It does cost money between the bandwidth
consumption and -even more significant - the time people have to spend
filtering.  IMO, the biggest threat to freedom of communication right now
isn't any government or ideology - it's spam.


Quote:
> not a bad idea to use the hosts file. maybe someone should set up a
server
> some where on the web that could share that file for everyone, auto
> download it everytime you log to the web, and auto add to it when ever
some
> one finds a new line to add to it. (probably way too much.)

> filtering for the single pixle isn't bad but it's not always a sinlge
> pixel. most {*filter*} spammers just use the graphic they send with the mail.
> {*filter*} jane is probably a web bug to tell them that they hit a real email
> address. it would be a simple matter of associating the address with a
> directory. when it gets accessed, bingo - found a real email address.

> --
> Dr.X
> "Alex K. Angelopoulos" <alex_angelopoulos_at_hotmail_dot_com_remove__>

> I've gotten so annoyed with the redirects and secondary ads that I
finally
> just started maintaining a huge HOSTS file on my machine.  I have a large
> file I've downloaded of known ad/spy sites, which just remaps their host
> names to 0.0.0.0, and I add the ones I find on my own. Works quite nicely
> too.

> The other trick I've seen is to use a Linux proxy server at home.  You
have
> to know something to set them up, but you can actually filter content
while
> it's coming through.  I seem to have heard about someone doing a check
for
> single-pixel images and using the Linux proxy to actually filter those
out
> specifically, too.



> > one quick and dirty way I found to get around some of the bugs when
using
> > outlook is to download all email for off line viewing. sometimes you'll
> > notice while viewing the email, outlook wants to log you back on to the
> > net. if that happens, then you know that a graphic (or some component)
in
> > that message needs to be retrieved from a server some where. now that
> don't
> > always mean it;s a bug. sometimes a company that has to send out a lot
of
> > email would prefer all the graphics to be on their web server rather
than
> > tie up their email server by making it send megs or even gigs of
graphics
> > in the messages. if you have a really large client base that gets a
> > newsletter, say 250 thousand users, you wouldn't want to send large
> > graphics to all of them all at once. you could just keep the pics on
the
> > web and let the web server handle the load. it would be spread out over
> > time since not all the recipients is likely to open their mail at the
> same
> > time. anyway, you can see the advantages and disadvantages in this
> method.
> > unfortunately, the technique was twisted around for use by spammers and
> > spyware. :-(

> > --
> > Dr.X


> > > Okayk, the email angle makes a whole lot of sense to me. No, I don't
> > condone
> > > it at all ... but I see how it all clicks together now. Hm. There's a
> lot
> > to
> > > be said for not having a HTML enabled browser, isn't there? Crafty
> little
> > > {*filter*} whoever originally thought up this one.



> > > > I sure am... makes me sick thinking of all the talent going to
waste.



> > > > : wow, I was sure there were some scripters in this ng that would
> > defend
> > > the
> > > > : use of these underhanded, unscrupulous, dirty little tricks. It's
> > nice
> > > to
> > > > : know we're all on the same page.  :-)
> > > > :
> > > > : --
> > > > : Dr.X
> > > > :


> > > > : > they call them web beacons, i call them bugs. if i have a web
> > server
> > > > : (wich
> > > > : > i do) and on that web server i have a website (no duh) in that
> > site, i
> > > > : can
> > > > : > place a 1 by 1 pixel image like a gif or jpg. now, if i wanted
to
> > get
> > > > : your
> > > > : > ip address or just confirm that you received an email from me,
> all
> > i
> > > have
> > > > : > to do is send you and email containing a reference to that
image
> on
> > my
> > > > : > site. when you receive that email, and open it, if you have an
> html
> > > > : enabled
> > > > : > email program, the email will have to retrieve that image from
my
> > site
> > > in
> > > > : > order to display it to you. you probably wont notice it since
> it's
> > 1
> > > by 1
> > > > : > (rather small) and i would make sure it is the same color as
the
> > > > : > backgroound of my message to you. now that it has retrieved
that
> > image
> > > > : from
> > > > : > my site, i can look at my web servers logs to see if that image
> was
> > > > : > retrieved, and it will show me your ip address. the fact that
it
> > was
> > > > : > retrieved is enough to tell me that you got my message. it is
> > really
> > > good
> > > > : > for forwarding stuff, as in, if i didn't want you to forward an
> > email
> > > > : > message because it was private, i can inspect my logs to see if
a
> > > > : different
> > > > : > ip address gets the image. that would tell me that you betrayed
> my
> > > trust.
> > > > : > also, if my website places cookies on your drive, i can make
even
> > more
> > > > : use
> > > > : > of this info, like share it with spammers, track your shopping
> > > habbits,
> > > > : all
> > > > : > sorts of {*filter*} little spy activity. :-( You can probably tell
> from
> > my
> > > > : words
> > > > : > that i dissaprove of these tactics...ok folks, let the flames
> > begin.
> > > ;-)
> > > > : >
> > > > : > --
> > > > : > Dr.X
> > > > : >
> > > > : >


> > > > : > > I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ...
> > what
> > > are
> > > > : > they
> > > > : > > and how do they work?
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > > --------------------
> > > > : > > Use of Web Beacons
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > > MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web
> > beacons -
> > > > : > sometimes
> > > > : > > called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who
> have
> > > > : visited
> > > > : > > those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may
include
> > web
> > > > : > beacons
> > > > : > > in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to
> > count
> > > how
> > > > : > many
> > > > : > > messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not
> > used
> > > to
> > > > : > access
> > > > : > > your personally identifiable information on the MSN network
of
> > sites
> > > > : and
> > > > : > > services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated
> > > statistics
> > > > : > about
> > > > : > > MSN Web site usage.
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > > Web beacons collect only a limited set of information
including
> a
> > > > : cookie
> > > > : > > number, time and date of a page view, and a description of
the
> > page
> > > on
> > > > : > which
> > > > : > > the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web
> > beacons
> > > > : placed
> > > > : > > there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN
> determine
> > > the
> > > > : > > effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > >
> > > > : > >
> > > > : >
> > > > : >
> > > > : >
> > > > :
> > > > :



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 05:32:33 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?


Fri, 19 Jun 1992 00:00:00 GMT  
 What's a "Web Beacon"?
I tried the hosts file.  And it brought my server to a standstill.

--
George Hester
_________________________________
"Alex K. Angelopoulos" <alex_angelopoulos_at_hotmail_dot_com_remove__> wrote

I've gotten so annoyed with the redirects and secondary ads that I finally
just started maintaining a huge HOSTS file on my machine.  I have a large
file I've downloaded of known ad/spy sites, which just remaps their host
names to 0.0.0.0, and I add the ones I find on my own. Works quite nicely
too.

The other trick I've seen is to use a Linux proxy server at home.  You have
to know something to set them up, but you can actually filter content while
it's coming through.  I seem to have heard about someone doing a check for
single-pixel images and using the Linux proxy to actually filter those out
specifically, too.


Quote:
> one quick and dirty way I found to get around some of the bugs when using
> outlook is to download all email for off line viewing. sometimes you'll
> notice while viewing the email, outlook wants to log you back on to the
> net. if that happens, then you know that a graphic (or some component) in
> that message needs to be retrieved from a server some where. now that
don't
> always mean it;s a bug. sometimes a company that has to send out a lot of
> email would prefer all the graphics to be on their web server rather than
> tie up their email server by making it send megs or even gigs of graphics
> in the messages. if you have a really large client base that gets a
> newsletter, say 250 thousand users, you wouldn't want to send large
> graphics to all of them all at once. you could just keep the pics on the
> web and let the web server handle the load. it would be spread out over
> time since not all the recipients is likely to open their mail at the same
> time. anyway, you can see the advantages and disadvantages in this method.
> unfortunately, the technique was twisted around for use by spammers and
> spyware. :-(

> --
> Dr.X


> > Okayk, the email angle makes a whole lot of sense to me. No, I don't
> condone
> > it at all ... but I see how it all clicks together now. Hm. There's a
lot
> to
> > be said for not having a HTML enabled browser, isn't there? Crafty
little
> > {*filter*} whoever originally thought up this one.



> > > I sure am... makes me sick thinking of all the talent going to waste.



> > > : wow, I was sure there were some scripters in this ng that would
> defend
> > the
> > > : use of these underhanded, unscrupulous, dirty little tricks. It's
> nice
> > to
> > > : know we're all on the same page.  :-)
> > > :
> > > : --
> > > : Dr.X
> > > :


> > > : > they call them web beacons, i call them bugs. if i have a web
> server
> > > : (wich
> > > : > i do) and on that web server i have a website (no duh) in that
> site, i
> > > : can
> > > : > place a 1 by 1 pixel image like a gif or jpg. now, if i wanted to
> get
> > > : your
> > > : > ip address or just confirm that you received an email from me, all
> i
> > have
> > > : > to do is send you and email containing a reference to that image
on
> my
> > > : > site. when you receive that email, and open it, if you have an
html
> > > : enabled
> > > : > email program, the email will have to retrieve that image from my
> site
> > in
> > > : > order to display it to you. you probably wont notice it since it's
> 1
> > by 1
> > > : > (rather small) and i would make sure it is the same color as the
> > > : > backgroound of my message to you. now that it has retrieved that
> image
> > > : from
> > > : > my site, i can look at my web servers logs to see if that image
was
> > > : > retrieved, and it will show me your ip address. the fact that it
> was
> > > : > retrieved is enough to tell me that you got my message. it is
> really
> > good
> > > : > for forwarding stuff, as in, if i didn't want you to forward an
> email
> > > : > message because it was private, i can inspect my logs to see if a
> > > : different
> > > : > ip address gets the image. that would tell me that you betrayed my
> > trust.
> > > : > also, if my website places cookies on your drive, i can make even
> more
> > > : use
> > > : > of this info, like share it with spammers, track your shopping
> > habbits,
> > > : all
> > > : > sorts of {*filter*} little spy activity. :-( You can probably tell from
> my
> > > : words
> > > : > that i dissaprove of these tactics...ok folks, let the flames
> begin.
> > ;-)
> > > : >
> > > : > --
> > > : > Dr.X
> > > : >
> > > : >


> > > : > > I've just read this on the MSN site and it got me curious ...
> what
> > are
> > > : > they
> > > : > > and how do they work?
> > > : > >
> > > : > > --------------------
> > > : > > Use of Web Beacons
> > > : > >
> > > : > > MSN Web pages may contain electronic images known as Web
> beacons -
> > > : > sometimes
> > > : > > called single-pixel gifs - that allow MSN to count users who
have
> > > : visited
> > > : > > those pages and to deliver co-branded services. MSN may include
> web
> > > : > beacons
> > > : > > in promotional e-mail messages or MSN Newsletters in order to
> count
> > how
> > > : > many
> > > : > > messages have been opened and acted upon. Web beacons are not
> used
> > to
> > > : > access
> > > : > > your personally identifiable information on the MSN network of
> sites
> > > : and
> > > : > > services; they are a technique we use to compile aggregated
> > statistics
> > > : > about
> > > : > > MSN Web site usage.
> > > : > >
> > > : > > Web beacons collect only a limited set of information including
a
> > > : cookie
> > > : > > number, time and date of a page view, and a description of the
> page
> > on
> > > : > which
> > > : > > the Web beacon resides. MSN Web pages may also contain Web
> beacons
> > > : placed
> > > : > > there by our advertising partner, Avenue A, to help MSN
determine
> > the
> > > : > > effectiveness of our Internet advertising campaigns.
> > > : > >
> > > : > >
> > > : > >
> > > : > >
> > > : >
> > > : >
> > > : >
> > > :
> > > :



Thu, 16 Sep 2004 08:29:00 GMT  
 
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