Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer? 
Author Message
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?

Hey all,

Are you looking to hire a competent developer?  I'm actively seeking
employment.  I have 15+ years of commercial application development
experience, and would be happy to send you a resume if you are looking to
hire.  Requests to joshm at taconic dot net.

Hoping-to-kick-off-the-new-year-with-a-new-job-ly yrs,

-- josh

-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
http://www.*-*-*.com/ - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----==  Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 05:19:36 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?



Quote:
> Hey all,

> Are you looking to hire a competent developer?

Yes desperately :-)

The question is: Will you consider relocating to Norway :)

--
Thor A. Johansen
Ibas AS
http://www.ibas.com



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 09:21:55 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?
What are the taxes like?<g>
-jeff
Quote:
----- Original Message -----

Newsgroups: comp.lang.python

Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2002 7:21 PM
Subject: Re: Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?



> > Hey all,

> > Are you looking to hire a competent developer?

> Yes desperately :-)

> The question is: Will you consider relocating to Norway :)

> --
> Thor A. Johansen
> Ibas AS
> http://www.ibas.com

> --
> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 09:57:19 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?

Quote:
> The question is: Will you consider relocating to Norway :)

Somehow, I don't think my wife will go for the idea.  But I *love*
telecommuting!

-- josh

-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
http://www.newsfeeds.com - The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World!
-----==  Over 80,000 Newsgroups - 16 Different Servers! =-----



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 11:22:51 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?

[Relocate to Norway?]

Quote:
> What are the taxes like?<g>

If you need to ask, you probably don't want to know. ;-)

Paul



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 19:00:26 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?

Quote:
> [Relocate to Norway?]
> > What are the taxes like?<g>
> If you need to ask, you probably don't want to know. ;-)

I don't think they are that bad in Norway, since we here in Denmark
graciously offerede them the part of the North Sea that was {*filter*}full of
oil. ;-)

But in Denmark it's close to 80% including VAT and other more hidden taxes!
Depending on how much you earn off course. But as a software developer you
earn enough that the high taxes kick in.

So lets please not talk more about taxes here. I get depressed :-(

regards Max M



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 19:34:35 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?

Quote:

> > [Relocate to Norway?]
> > > What are the taxes like?<g>
    ...
> But in Denmark it's close to 80% including VAT and other more hidden

taxes!

According to http://database.townhall.com/heritage/index/country.cfm?ID= ...
with the ID values for various countries:

Country    top income tax rate    average taxpayer's marginal tax rate

Denmark    59                        46
Sweden     56                        20
France     54                        33
Germany    51                        35.4
Canada     48.75                     26        includes Federal and
Provincial
Italy      46                        34
Norway     41.5                      28
UK         40                        23
USA        39.6                      28        NB Federal taxes only
Finland    38                        25.5

So, Norway ain't too bad -- indeed, you might be better off there than
in some US states, depending on varying State-level taxation of income.
Denmark, as maxm indicates, is indeed by far costliest, while Finland
has a very attractive fiscal regime for individual earners.

Of course, VAT and/or sales taxes also vary widely, and may influence
your fiscal position, depending on what portion of your income you plan
to *spend* (as opposed to saving/investing), and spend where.  I believe
they're not too far from 20% in various European states, lower in North
America (down to no sales taxes at all in some US States).  Similarly
for other taxes, e.g. on real estate, depending in this case where you
plan to live (direct effect on property, indirect on rents), and other
taxes depending on your planned consumption patterns.  E.g., I believe that
Denmark has by far the highest tax rate of the listed countries on car
purchases, and all European countries have high tax rates on car fuel,
but on the other hand public transportation may enjoy net "negative taxes"
(subsidies) so that you pay less for your bus tickets than their fair
market price (in the US, this widely varies, by city even more than by
State).  Decisions about where to earn, where to spend, where to live,
etc, are strongly correlated, but not entirely so (around borders, it's
quite normal for people to live/work/spend in different fiscal areas --
e.g., there are large shopping areas in New Hampshire just across the
border from Massachussets... guess why!-).

Alex



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 20:23:54 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?
Would you consider teleworking...

...from S America?  :o)

On a more serious, and perhaps more Python-related note, I've been
teleworking for three years and (with certain provisos) it has worked
very well.  Companies looking for programmers with "rarer" skills
might want to consider it (I'd be happy to answer questions here or by
email if anyone is curious - I guess other people here will have
experience too).

Andrew

(Who really is moving to Chile and looking for work there).


Quote:



>> Hey all,

>> Are you looking to hire a competent developer?

> Yes desperately :-)

> The question is: Will you consider relocating to Norway :)

[...]

--
http://www.acooke.org



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 20:28:05 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?

Quote:
> Would you consider teleworking...

> ...from S America?  :o)

> On a more serious, and perhaps more Python-related note, I've been
> teleworking for three years and (with certain provisos) it has worked
> very well.  Companies looking for programmers with "rarer" skills
> might want to consider it (I'd be happy to answer questions here or by
> email if anyone is curious - I guess other people here will have
> experience too).

I think the theme is very interesting, particularly the sub-theme
of what methodologies and technologies work, and how well, in
various teleworking situations.

think3, inc, my current employer, has gone for a related geographical
strategy of opening small development labs where certain key people
wanted to live and work.  As a result, we're now very spread-out, in
geographical terms, compared to company size, with SW labs locate in
half a dozen timezones stretching from Karnataka to California.

Video-based (slow-scan) teleconferencing has apparently proved OK
for typical managers' needs -- basically, "human" connection and chat
beyond the confines of emails/newsgroups/intranet-based groupware.
Not exactly cheap in terms of equipment and bandwidth, but those
are definitely minor issues compared to, e.g., the cost of a plane
roundtrip touching both US coasts, a couple of locations in Europe,
and India.  It does mean strange working times occasionally, but
that's still less stress and fatigue than a plane trip, again.

As a techie, I'm anything but satisfied of what we've come up with
in terms of techie-to-techie close cooperation, though.  Specifically,
in my role as internal consultant/mentor/advisor, I know I've been
hugely more effective face-to-face than via such tools as video,
email, and so on.  None of those, in particular, seem to support
*pair-programming* and closely related practices of design and code
inspection -- and yet these practices are key to effective close
cooperation and mentoring.

What tools and/or novel methodologies have you found effective in
such pursuits?  "Off-line" ideas (helpful across timezone gulfs
are fine) -- CVS or other roughly equivalent schemes, email, wiki
and/or newsgroups -- and some widespread "online" ideas also work,
to some extent (muds/irc/intranet-based/...).  But I keep thinking
there must be something better -- some good ways to simulate and
enhance sitting next to each other at a keyboard.

VNC apparently supports that -- two VNC clients going to the same
VNC server, with either client able to "drive" in keyboard and
mouse terms.  I've only tried VNC experimentally on a fast LAN,
though, and not for "pair-programming like activities".  Surely
it should be possible to do better by building in similar abilities
into suitable development environments such as IDLE or...?  And/or
integrate those with 'free chat' abilities, as in voice-over-IP or
even just textual/messaging arrangements?

Any applicable experience will be of interest!

Alex



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 20:56:07 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?

[teleworking]

Quote:
> I think the theme is very interesting, particularly the sub-theme
> of what methodologies and technologies work, and how well, in
> various teleworking situations.

I've been doing it for 6 years. In my experience the key factor is simply
how responsive people are to email. CVS is also a necessity (well, one
client used ClearCase - I worked out some scripts so I could keep my CVS in
synch with their ClearCase).

I live in rural Maine. No cable, no DSL (coming "soon" <snort>), ISDN would
cost me $400/month + long distance charges for each instant online. I've
used VNC through a tunnel - man oh man, is that painful. Each mouse movement
/ click or keypress means a 2 to 10 second wait (I blame more than half of
that on the pitiful box my client used for the tunnel). And don't run a DOS
box on a remote Windows machine - the "just what changed" logic doesn't
work, so the simple existence of the DOS box will saturate your connection.

But I'm an independent developer, not an employee, so I get a little more
leeway.

[And like the guy who started this thread, I'm looking for new work, too.]

-- Gordon
http://www.mcmillan-inc.com/



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 22:28:26 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?


Quote:
> i've
> used VNC through a tunnel - man oh man, is that painful. Each mouse
> movement / click or keypress means a 2 to 10 second wait (I blame more
> than half of that on the pitiful box my client used for the tunnel).
> And don't run a DOS box on a remote Windows machine - the "just what
> changed" logic doesn't work, so the simple existence of the DOS box
> will saturate your connection.

i tested VNC over a cable connection (128kbits upstram) it worked good.
also note that a VNC server on X is MUCH faster than on windows due to the
fact that xvnc does know what has changed. (disable any fancy graphics
anyway and select 8 bit mode for the VNC client)

and just for those who don't know VNC, here's the link:
http://www.uk.research.att.com/vnc/

--



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 23:06:08 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?

Quote:

> As a techie, I'm anything but satisfied of what we've come up with
> in terms of techie-to-techie close cooperation, though.  Specifically,
> in my role as internal consultant/mentor/advisor, I know I've been
> hugely more effective face-to-face than via such tools as video,
> email, and so on.  None of those, in particular, seem to support
> *pair-programming* and closely related practices of design and code
> inspection -- and yet these practices are key to effective close
> cooperation and mentoring.

I wouldn't have though pair programming would have much chance of
working if you weren't in front of the same terminal.  I worked in a
very different way - effectively on mini-projects - and did sometimes
(about once every couple of months) visited "base".

Quote:
> What tools and/or novel methodologies have you found effective in
> such pursuits?  "Off-line" ideas (helpful across timezone gulfs
> are fine) -- CVS or other roughly equivalent schemes, email, wiki
> and/or newsgroups -- and some widespread "online" ideas also work,
> to some extent (muds/irc/intranet-based/...).  But I keep thinking
> there must be something better -- some good ways to simulate and
> enhance sitting next to each other at a keyboard.

Being friends with the other developer(s) is probably worth its weight
in gold.  Chatting over a phone once a day is useful, even if you
don't feel you're actually working.

On a more mundane level, everyone (small company) posting once a day a
summary of what they have done is useful (a summary of what they're
going to do in the morning helps too).  This helps replace the
information you gather in "background noise" in an office.

Both those comments have a similar theme - that it's the informal flow
of information that needs help.  Requirements, Specs and Designs can
be emailed and read wherever you are, but when you're half way across
the country you don't hear someone swearing about something in your
code that could be easily changed...

Regular release cycles help too - testing and bug fixing tends to
generate some "communal spirit" and you get to poke around in each
other's code (so a distributed bug tracking database is necessary).

Andrew

--
http://www.acooke.org



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 23:08:00 GMT  
 Anyone looking to hire a Python/C++ developer?


Quote:
> What tools and/or novel methodologies have you found effective in
> such pursuits?  "Off-line" ideas (helpful across timezone gulfs
> are fine) -- CVS or other roughly equivalent schemes, email, wiki
> and/or newsgroups -- and some widespread "online" ideas also work,
> to some extent (muds/irc/intranet-based/...).  But I keep thinking
> there must be something better -- some good ways to simulate and
> enhance sitting next to each other at a keyboard.

My company is 100% distributed -- no 2 of us are in the same place (except
for admin staff at the home office in LA). From what I've seen, the success
of telework is more or less dependant on the culture of the company. I keep
running into people who have horror stories to tell about telecommuting (and
every so often I see articles on the "Telecommuting Backlash"). Almost
without fail, failures are tied to being a single telecommuter trying to
work in concert with a traditional office group. I'm not surprised that
those situations don't work most of the time.

The tools that we use are FirstClass (a workgroup server), CVS, and the
telephone when needed. Because all the other 'watercooler chatter' happens
online in the same space, nothing is lost (once you get used to working like
this). Most client communication happens on the workgroup server as well --
it's nice to have a paper trail of every decision on a project both
internally and externally. (where 'nice' == 'crucial').

We don't use pair programming, so that hasn't been an issue for us. The only
time that we've used video conferencing regularly (AFAIK) is when a team was
working on video conferencing software, so that was debugging and test as
well. I don't feel that I lose anything by not seeing faces.

YMMV.

BgP

--
// Brett g Porter * Lead Engineer, Development Practices

// Art & Logic, Inc. * software engineering and design
// Desktop * Embedded * Web



Mon, 21 Jun 2004 23:38:56 GMT  
 
 [ 25 post ]  Go to page: [1] [2]

 Relevant Pages 

1. Looking to hire a python programmer.

2. Looking to hire a part-time python programmer

3. Python Developer looking for work

4. Looking for a python developer

5. Looking for Python Developers in Nova Scotia, Canada

6. Smalltalk developer for hire

7. PASSIONATE GUI DEVELOPER - HCI Developer - Smalltalk, C++, JAVA ,WebSphere - Full/Time/TORONTO

8. GUI DEVELOPER - HCI Developer - Smalltalk, C++, JAVA ,WebSphere - Full/Time/TORONTO

9. Need to Hire 3 VisualWorks Developers in NC

10. Software Developer for Hire

11. Gensym Corporation - Hiring Lisp Software Developers

12. ParcPlace is hiring a Smalltalk Developer

 

 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software