Who likes Info files? 
Author Message
 Who likes Info files?

I was thinking about converting all the python documentation to Info
files. Currently, a python script converts the library reference to texinfo,
but the other parts of the doc can't be converted.

Since adapting the script in a 'clean' way might need some effort, I have to
know how many of you will actually use it, and whether it should be ready
for the release of Python 1.2

-- Eric Daniel

--
-- Eric Daniel



Sun, 31 Aug 1997 12:45:45 GMT  
 Who likes Info files?

I wonder if someone would care to help us beginners out and sumarize
the major new features of 1.2, i.e why would a newbie want to upgrade
from 1.1.1 after 1.2 becomes stable. Is there anything significant
there or is this cleanup.

Regards,

Steve Morris



Tue, 02 Sep 1997 02:22:35 GMT  
 Who likes Info files?

Quote:
> I wonder if someone would care to help us beginners out and sumarize
> the major new features of 1.2, i.e why would a newbie want to upgrade
> from 1.1.1 after 1.2 becomes stable. Is there anything significant
> there or is this cleanup.

It's rather more than cleanup, although there's lots of that too --
many bugs have been fixed and leaks plugged (e.g. the dreaded Linux
ternary pow() crash is fixed, and I think it now compiles without
trouble using GCC on the DEC Alpha).  It's also more portable.

Highlights of the user-visible changes:

Documentation strings -- a string literal at the beginning of a
function, class, module etc. turns into the object's __doc__
attribute (default None).

User-defined classes can be used as exceptions.

New modules:

        pickle, shelve, copy (persistency, shallow/deep copying)

        cgi, urllib, htmllib and lots more (WWW/Internet)

There is now real documentation for the de{*filter*} and profiler (and in
fact for several modules that were undocumented in 1.1, such as types,
traceback).

The special methods __coerce__ and __cmp__ for user-defined classes now
work properly.

Hooks are in place so you can program restricted execution of
untrusted code (a.k.a. "safe-python").  By redefining the built-in
function __import__ you can write your own implementation of import
(using the new imp module which provides the tools for importing
modules).

And if you're extending or embedding Python, the following might be
important:

The run-time API has changed to exclusive use of the new naming scheme
(e.g. PyObject *, Py_None, PyList_GetItem() instead of object *, None,
getlistitem()).  Full backward compatibility is provided.  There are
lots of smaller (compatible) changes to the API as well.  The
extensions manual has been updated to document the new naming scheme
and the new options to (new)getargs (renamed to PyArg_ParseTuple()).

I hope this helps and keeps you on the lookout for the new release
(very soon now!),


< http://www.*-*-*.com/ ;

PS Follow the links from this URL to the Python on-line documentation,
and you'll see the docs for 1.2!



Wed, 03 Sep 1997 01:07:26 GMT  
 Who likes Info files?
: I was thinking about converting all the Python documentation to Info
: files. Currently, a python script converts the library reference to texinfo,
: but the other parts of the doc can't be converted.  [ ... ]

Personally, info files give me the heebie-jeebies.  I would much prefer
html documentation, or even Plain Old Text...  Not that I'll complain if
you do it, as long as there is some alternative to info.  (One of my
problems with info is that it isn't easy to view from a Mac/Windows
machine unless you install emacs.)

How about something like the perl5 manuals?  They are in an sort of
intermediate language, and come with scripts that will turn them into
either man pages or html (or both).  I don't think it would be too
hard to add an info translator for something of that nature...

-- Tim
--



Sun, 07 Sep 1997 02:18:32 GMT  
 Who likes Info files?

Tim> Personally, info files give me the heebie-jeebies.  I would much prefer
Tim> html documentation, or even Plain Old Text...  Not that I'll complain if
Tim> you do it, as long as there is some alternative to info.  (One of my
Tim> problems with info is that it isn't easy to view from a Mac/Windows
Tim> machine unless you install emacs.)

The Linux documentation project has produced some tool that allow one to
annotate documents in something like SGML, and then convert that to
plain text, or html, or other formats.



Sat, 13 Sep 1997 05:42:33 GMT  
 Who likes Info files?

: Tim> Personally, info files give me the heebie-jeebies.  I would much prefer
: Tim> html documentation, or even Plain Old Text...  Not that I'll complain if
: Tim> you do it, as long as there is some alternative to info.  (One of my
: Tim> problems with info is that it isn't easy to view from a Mac/Windows
: Tim> machine unless you install emacs.)

: The Linux documentation project has produced some tool that allow one to
: annotate documents in something like SGML, and then convert that to
: plain text, or html, or other formats.

Perl5.0 contains an app called pod2html.  It converts a simplified
mark-up language into HTML.  (A Pythoner who objects to using Perl 5
could probably re-write it pretty easily; it's about 200 lines of
Perl 5 code.)  I use lynx and that makes reading docs pretty easy, but
I wish I had better search facilities.  (grepping files seems crude
somehow.)

--
----------------------
Dave Kuhlman
Reify, Redwood City, CA

----------------------



Sat, 20 Sep 1997 03:00:00 GMT  
 Who likes Info files?
In comp.lang.python,


:
:: Tim> Personally, info files give me the heebie-jeebies.  I would much prefer
:: Tim> html documentation, or even Plain Old Text...  Not that I'll complain if
:: Tim> you do it, as long as there is some alternative to info.  (One of my
:: Tim> problems with info is that it isn't easy to view from a Mac/Windows
:: Tim> machine unless you install emacs.)
:
:: The Linux documentation project has produced some tool that allow one to
:: annotate documents in something like SGML, and then convert that to
:: plain text, or html, or other formats.
:
:Perl5.0 contains an app called pod2html.  It converts a simplified
:mark-up language into HTML.  (A Pythoner who objects to using Perl 5
:could probably re-write it pretty easily; it's about 200 lines of
:Perl 5 code.)  I use lynx and that makes reading docs pretty easy, but
:I wish I had better search facilities.  (grepping files seems crude
:somehow.)

Unless there's a perl2python or python2perl translator, I wouldn't
suggest a rewrite.  Otherwise you won't be able to follow any udpates.

Besides a program to translate pod into html, there are also translators
from pod to [nt]roff (that's with the -man package) and latex.

POD isn't anything extraordinary.  It stands for "Plain Old Documentation",
and isn't meant to be an html replacement.  It's really quite simple.

--tom
--

150 years ago everybody was a Christian Scientist.   --dmr



Wed, 24 Sep 1997 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 9 post ] 

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