wanted. english word. 
Author Message
 wanted. english word.

Quote:

> > [Laura Creighton]
> > > What do you call the thing that pops up and says `Searching' or
> > > something to reassure the user that his computer hasn't crashed
> > > and the application is still running?

> > a general description is "Progress Dialog"

> A progress dialog only applies to a process that has a quantifiable
> end; she's looking for something that will take "a while" for some
> unknowable value of "a while".  I recommended "hourglass", since
> that's what they used to call it in the Macintosh Human Interface
> Guidelines (remember when Apple's GUI designs were based on iterations
> of user testing and not on glitz and whim?).

Nope - it's the barber-shop pole lying on it's side. It's still called a
"Progress Dialog", but rather than having a progress bar, it's got a
barber-shop pole turning.

The hourglass is what is (or used to be) used for the mouse cursor. It's a
good idea to use both.

Tim Delaney



Sun, 16 Nov 2003 08:54:04 GMT  
 wanted. english word.

Quote:

> > The hourglass is what is (or used to be) used for the mouse cursor.

> On the Mac it's usually a wris{*filter*}ch - with
> spinning hands if you want it animated.

Bah - silly me. Of course it is. Or it's a spinning beach ball.

Been using Windoze for too long ... been a while since I've used my Mac for
much :( Need a newer one to run MacOS X.

Tim Delaney



Sun, 16 Nov 2003 13:53:50 GMT  
 wanted. english word.

| > >
| > > The hourglass is what is (or used to be) used for the mouse cursor.
| >
| > On the Mac it's usually a wris{*filter*}ch - with
| > spinning hands if you want it animated.
|
| Bah - silly me. Of course it is. Or it's a spinning beach ball.
|
| Been using Windoze for too long ... been a while since I've used my Mac for
| much :( Need a newer one to run MacOS X.

Nah, just get OpenBSD (or is it FreeBSD?) -- it's the same kernel.  I
don't actually know what hardware requirements the *BSD's have, but I
know Linux will run on any M68K with a PMMU or any PPC machine :-).

Isn't it a little ridiculous to spend cpu time updating an animated
wris{*filter*}ch/whatever on the screen instead of putting all available
power into comleting the task?  I guess on an unstable system it is
warranted, however ;-).

-D



Sun, 16 Nov 2003 19:50:19 GMT  
 wanted. english word.

Quote:

> Nah, just get OpenBSD (or is it FreeBSD?) -- it's the same kernel.  I
> don't actually know what hardware requirements the *BSD's have, but I
> know Linux will run on any M68K with a PMMU or any PPC machine :-).

   Though FreeBSD is oriented towards 386+ processors, NetBSD (and,
perhaps, OpenBSD) can be ran on almost every 32bit processor in the world!

Quote:
> Isn't it a little ridiculous to spend cpu time updating an animated
> wris{*filter*}ch/whatever on the screen instead of putting all available
> power into comleting the task?  I guess on an unstable system it is
> warranted, however ;-).

   No, it is not. If we (personnaly, I am unixhead, mostly linuxoid) want
to conquer the world we simply must take into account user interface
guidelines.
   And modern computer are overpowered anyway, why not to give away some

Oleg.
----

           Programmers don't die, they just GOSUB without RETURN.



Sun, 16 Nov 2003 21:01:00 GMT  
 wanted. english word.

| > Nah, just get OpenBSD (or is it FreeBSD?) -- it's the same kernel.  I
| > don't actually know what hardware requirements the *BSD's have, but I
| > know Linux will run on any M68K with a PMMU or any PPC machine :-).
|
|    Though FreeBSD is oriented towards 386+ processors, NetBSD (and,
| perhaps, OpenBSD) can be ran on almost every 32bit processor in the world!

Ok, I'm not too well versed on the differences between the various BSD
distributions and what hardware/software they support.

| > Isn't it a little ridiculous to spend cpu time updating an animated
| > wris{*filter*}ch/whatever on the screen instead of putting all available
| > power into comleting the task?  I guess on an unstable system it is
| > warranted, however ;-).
|
|    No, it is not. If we (personnaly, I am unixhead, mostly linuxoid) want
| to conquer the world we simply must take into account user interface
| guidelines.

Well, what if the really long task was completed effectively
instantaneously?  I think that having no delays would be an even
better UI; though of course that isn't always possible even on decent
platforms ;-).  

|    And modern computer are overpowered anyway, why not to give away

No problem as long as it doesn't take forever for the real job at hand
to complete :-) (again, not always possible on today's platforms, not
to mention any particular company's name here...<wink>).

-D



Sun, 16 Nov 2003 22:01:11 GMT  
 wanted. english word.

Quote:

> I don't think so. The processing required is negligible,
> and it really *does* make one feel better to see that
> something is being done.

My complaint is with the animations that keep going even when the
process they represent isn't. For example, use Windows to drag a file
over a network. The little pages keep flying across the screen even when
the connection is hug. What good is *that*? :-)

--
Darren New / Senior MTS & Free Radical / Invisible Worlds Inc.
       San Diego, CA, USA (PST).  Cryptokeys on demand.
     This is top-quality raw fish, the Rolls-Rice of Sushi!



Tue, 18 Nov 2003 00:38:33 GMT  
 wanted. english word.

Quote:

> My complaint is with the animations that keep going even when the
> process they represent isn't.

Yes, I agree that kind of animation is worse than
useless. Whatever you use to indicate progress, it
should represent REAL progress!

The tricky part is coming up with a way of measuring
progress that is both meaningful and reasonably
smooth. I hate it when e.g. the progress bar zips
quickly up to about 25%, sits there for half an
hour, and then suddenly jumps the rest of the
way...

--
Greg Ewing, Computer Science Dept, University of Canterbury,      
Christchurch, New Zealand
To get my email address, please visit my web page:        
http://www.cosc.canterbury.ac.nz/~greg



Tue, 18 Nov 2003 11:45:29 GMT  
 
 [ 9 post ] 

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