Prolog for Powermac? 
Author Message
 Prolog for Powermac?

Does anyone know of any prolog implementations that runs on a powermac in
native mode, commercial or otherwise?

Lars G. Johnsen



Mon, 13 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 Prolog for Powermac?

Quote:

> Does anyone know of any prolog implementations that runs on a powermac in
> native mode, commercial or otherwise?

> Lars G. Johnsen

Open Prolog is still 68K-coded, so it is emulated. However, the newer 68K
emulators give Open Prolog much better performance on Power Macs.
(Presumably the same is true for the other Prolog implementations.)

For instance, naive reverse on a Performa 5300 (100 MHz 603e & System
7.5.1) is about 25 klips with the standard 68K emulator. With Connectix
Speed-Doubler, it's about 130 klips!

Another example: using System 7.5.2's built-in emulator, OP runs about 190
klips on a stock 9500.

Hope this helps.

Mike.



Sat, 18 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 Prolog for Powermac?

Quote:

> Does anyone know of any prolog implementations that runs on a powermac in
> native mode, commercial or otherwise?

SICStus Prolog 3.0 should be available native for PowerMacs before
the end of the year. Take a look at the URL: http://www.sics.se/ps/sicstus.html

Regards,

Paulo



Thu, 23 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 Prolog for Powermac?
Mike:

Just curious: what is a "klip". I'm guessing that it is thousands of
somethings per second (or other unit of time)

Thanks.



Mon, 27 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 Prolog for Powermac?
: Mike:

: Just curious: what is a "klip". I'm guessing that it is thousands of
: somethings per second (or other unit of time)

Right you are.  Logic programming systems are in the habit of measuring
performance in multiples of LIPS, which are Logical Inferences Per Second,
analogous to FLOPS (FLoating-point Operations Per Second) for more numerically-
oriented languages.

Of course, to discuss LIPS implies that the underlying logic is known,
consistent, etc. which may or may not be a safe assumption for N logic
programming systems, where N is a set that includes, for example, non-Prolog
systems (that is, systems not necessarily based solely and strictly on
Horn-clause resolution--and yes, I'm aware that that assumption doesn't even
necessarily hold for "Prolog" implementations).

: Thanks.

Paul Snively



Wed, 29 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 Prolog for Powermac?

Quote:

>Just curious: what is a "klip". I'm guessing that it is thousands of
>somethings per second (or other unit of time)

LIPS stands for "Logical Inferences Per Second".
That of course just raises the question - what exactly constitutes
one logic inference?

LIPS are usually defined specifically in terms of performance
on the naive reverse benchmark, which look something like this:

        go :-  
                data(Data),
                nreverse(Data, _).

        data([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,
                16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30]).

        nreverse([X|L0], L) :-
                nreverse(L0, L1), concatenate(L1, [X], L).
        nreverse([], []).

        concatenate([X|L1], L2, [X|L3]) :-      
                concatenate(L1, L2, L3).
        concatenate([], L, L).

An execution of this benchmark is defined to take exactly 496 logical
inferences.  So LIPS = 496 / time in seconds per iteration
of the naive reverse benchmark.  For example, on our SPARCserver 1000,
Mercury takes 106 microseconds per iteration (using the asm_fast grade),
which gives a speed of 4.68 MLIPS (mega-LIPS).

Of course, naive reverse is a pretty trivial benchmark -
generalising from the results on naive reverse to the results on
real programs would be a bad idea.  

Benchmark results for Mercury and a variety of Prolog implementations
on naive reverse and nine other small benchmarks are available on
<http://www.cs.mu.oz.au/~zs/mercury/benchmarks.html>.

--
Fergus Henderson                WWW: http://www.cs.mu.oz.au/~fjh



Thu, 30 Apr 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 Prolog for Powermac?


Quote:

> : Mike:

> : Just curious: what is a "klip". I'm guessing that it is thousands of
> : somethings per second (or other unit of time)

> Right you are.  Logic programming systems are in the habit of measuring
> performance in multiples of LIPS, which are Logical Inferences Per Second,
> analogous to FLOPS (FLoating-point Operations Per Second) for more
numerically-
> oriented languages.


must be something wrong with our news feed.

Mike



Fri, 01 May 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 7 post ] 

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