Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...' 
Author Message
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'

                        CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

                         CADE-15 Workshop on

       Problem-solving Methodologies  with Automated Deduction

                        Sunday, July, 5, 1998

[{*filter*}version included below ]        

Recent examples have shown new practical applications of Automated
Deduction in various important domains.  There are successes of
automated theorem provers (ATPs) in planning, demonstrating that ATPs
can even outperform specialised planning systems.  In model-based
diagnosis, tableau-based proof procedures are used to compute
explanations of faulty circuits. In program verification, ATPs are
embedded to achieve a higher degree of automation.  In systems to
support software reuse, ATPs are used to identify modules from a
library to match a given specification.  In natural language
understanding ATP techniques are used to integrate world knowledge
into the interpretation process.  Finally, the Robbins algebra success
demonstrated how automated theorem provers can continue to solve open
mathematical problems.

This workshop is intented to fall between a system competition and a
program consisting only of scientific talks. The workshop will
consider a set of examples, representative of different practical
domains, and analyse the effectiveness of different systems and
methodologies for solving each one.

Instead of measuring the raw power and speed of ATP systems over the
TPTP examples, we have a different focus: the solution of real-world
problems by ATP system designers plus their programs.

Submissions
-----------

The workshop home page

        http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~peter/cade-15-ws/

contains problem sets from domains Mathematics, Software Verification,
Reactive Systems Specification, Natural Language Processing, Diagnosis
and Planning. Contributions may discuss one or more of these workshop
problems.

The paper to be submitted should consist of a description and analysis
of the whole solution process. That is, it should discuss:

 o how the problem is formulated within the system (language/logic),
 o which inference methods are used within the system,
 o what, if any, user interaction is required,
 o how the system parameters are tuned to find a solution, and
 o how the solution is presented by the system.

Hopefully, some problems will be solved by more than one system.
Hence there will be a chance to compare solutions and to discuss the
differences between the proof systems and methods of attack.

Contributions dealing with a problem from the literature are also
welcome, provided that they discuss the solution process as proposed.

Contribution format:

        postscript, max. 10 pages llncs-style,

        before May, 15.

The submissions will be reviewed by the organizers and accepted
contributions will be included into the workshop notes that will be
made available at the workshop.

Note: all workshop participants are expected to register for the main
      CADE-15 conference.

Important Dates
---------------

Deadline for submissions:              15 May  1998
Notification of acceptance/rejection:  29 May  1998
Deadline for final text:               12 June 1998
Workshop:                              5  July 1998

Organisers
----------








Information
-----------


  or WWW:   http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~cade-15/

  or WWW: http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~peter/cade-15-ws/
or surface mail:
        Peter Baumgartner
        University of Koblenz-Landau
        Institute for Computer Science    
        Rheinau 1
        D-56075 Koblenz, Germany
        Phone: +49-261-9119-426
        Fax:   +49-261-9119-496

\documentstyle{article}
                            %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
                            %%       Call for Participation       %%
                            %%                                    %%
                            %%          CADE-Workshop on          %%
                            %%                                    %%
                            %%    Problem Solving Methodologies   %%
                            %%       with Automated Deduction     %%
                            %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

\def\head{
{\bf                              CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

Quote:
}\\[2mm]                                Workshop on

\\[2mm]{\huge\bf                   Problem-solving Methodologies  \\[1mm]
                  with Automated Deduction
Quote:
}\large\\[2mm]                              5 July 1998

%
\\                                  in conjunction with
                                          CADE-15
\\                 Fif{*filter*}th International Conference on Automated Deduction
\\[3mm]
{\bf                                  Lindau -- Germany

Quote:
}}

\def\body{
Recent examples have shown new practical applications of Automated
Deduction in various important domains.  There are successes
of automated theorem provers (ATPs) in planning, demonstrating that
ATPs can even outperform specialised planning systems.  In
model-based diagnosis, tableau-based proof procedures are used to
compute explanations of faulty circuits. In program verification, ATPs
are embedded to achieve a higher degree of automation.  In systems to
support software reuse, ATPs are used to identify modules from a
library to match a given specification.  In natural language
understanding ATP techniques are used to integrate world knowledge
into the interpretation process.  Finally, the Robbins algebra
success demonstrated how automated theorem provers can continue to
solve open mathematical problems.  

This workshop is intented to fall between a system competition and a
program consisting only of scientific talks. The workshop will
consider a set of examples, representative of different practical
domains, and analyse the effectiveness of different systems and
methodologies for solving each one.

Instead of measuring the raw power and speed of ATP systems over the
TPTP examples, we have a different focus: the solution of real-world
problems by ATP system designers plus their programs.

\sect{     SUBMISSIONS

Quote:
}

The workshop home page
        {\tt http://www.*-*-*.com/ \~{}peter/cade-15-ws/}
contains problem sets from domains {\em Mathematics\/},
{\em Software Verification\/}, {\em Reactive Systems Specification\/},
{\em Natural
Language Processing\/}, {\em Diagnosis\/} and {\em
  Planning\/}. Contributions may discuss one or more
of these workshop problems.

The paper to be submitted should consist of a description and analysis
of the whole solution process. That is, it should discuss:
\begin{itemize}
 \item how the problem is formulated within the system (language/logic),
 \item which inference methods are used within the system,
 \item what, if any, user interaction is required,
 \item how the system parameters are tuned to find a solution, and
 \item how the solution is presented by the system.
\end{itemize}
Hopefully, some problems will be solved by more than one system.
Hence there will be a chance to compare solutions and to discuss the
differences between the proof systems and methods of attack.

Contributions  dealing with a problem from  the
literature are also welcome, provided that they discuss the solution
process as proposed.

{\em Contribution format:\/}
        Postscript, max.\ 10 pages llncs-style,

        {\bf before May, 15}.
The submissions will be reviewed by the organizers and accepted
contributions will be included into the
workshop notes that will be made available at the workshop.

{\em Note:\/} all workshop participants are expected to register for the main
      CADE-15 conference.
\phantom{1}

Quote:
}

\long\def\pract{
\in{ORGANISERS:}{
\begin{itemize}
\item Peter Baumgartner \\ Universit{\"a}t Koblenz, Germany,\\

\item Ulrich Furbach \\ Universit{\"a}t Koblenz, Germany,\\

\item Michael Kohlhase \\ Universit{\"a}t des Saarlandes, Germany,\\

\item William McCune \\ Argonne National Laboratory, USA,\\

\item Wolfgang Reif \\ Universit{\"a}t Ulm, Germany,\\

\item Mark Stickel \\ SRI International, USA,\\

\item Tom{\'a}s  Uribe \\ Stanford University, USA,\\

\end{itemize}

Quote:
}

\in{             IMPORTANT DATES
Quote:
}{\begin{center}

\info{           Deadline for submissions:            }{15 May  1998}
\info{           Notification of acceptance/rejection:}{29 May  1998}
\info{           Deadline for final text:             }{12 June 1998}
\info{           Workshop:                            }{5  July 1998}
\end{center}}

\in{    INFORMATION

Quote:
}{\begin{center}


\info       {or WWW:}{ http://www.*-*-*.com/ .\\informatik.tu-darmstadt.de/\~{}cade-15/}

\info       {or WWW:}{ http://www.*-*-*.com/ \~{}peter/cade-15-ws/}
\info       {or surface mail:}           {Peter Baumgartner
\\                                        University of Koblenz-Landau
\\                                        Institute for Computer Science    
\\                                        Rheinau 1
\\                                        D-56075 Koblenz, Germany
\\                                      
...

read more »



Fri, 27 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'

                        CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

                         CADE-15 Workshop on

       Problem-solving Methodologies  with Automated Deduction

                        Sunday, July, 5, 1998

[{*filter*}version included below ]        

Recent examples have shown new practical applications of Automated
Deduction in various important domains.  There are successes of
automated theorem provers (ATPs) in planning, demonstrating that ATPs
can even outperform specialised planning systems.  In model-based
diagnosis, tableau-based proof procedures are used to compute
explanations of faulty circuits. In program verification, ATPs are
embedded to achieve a higher degree of automation.  In systems to
support software reuse, ATPs are used to identify modules from a
library to match a given specification.  In natural language
understanding ATP techniques are used to integrate world knowledge
into the interpretation process.  Finally, the Robbins algebra success
demonstrated how automated theorem provers can continue to solve open
mathematical problems.

This workshop is intented to fall between a system competition and a
program consisting only of scientific talks. The workshop will
consider a set of examples, representative of different practical
domains, and analyse the effectiveness of different systems and
methodologies for solving each one.

Instead of measuring the raw power and speed of ATP systems over the
TPTP examples, we have a different focus: the solution of real-world
problems by ATP system designers plus their programs.

Submissions
-----------

The workshop home page

        http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~peter/cade-15-ws/

contains problem sets from domains Mathematics, Software Verification,
Reactive Systems Specification, Natural Language Processing, Diagnosis
and Planning. Contributions may discuss one or more of these workshop
problems.

The paper to be submitted should consist of a description and analysis
of the whole solution process. That is, it should discuss:

 o how the problem is formulated within the system (language/logic),
 o which inference methods are used within the system,
 o what, if any, user interaction is required,
 o how the system parameters are tuned to find a solution, and
 o how the solution is presented by the system.

Hopefully, some problems will be solved by more than one system.
Hence there will be a chance to compare solutions and to discuss the
differences between the proof systems and methods of attack.

Contributions dealing with a problem from the literature are also
welcome, provided that they discuss the solution process as proposed.

Contribution format:

        Postscript, max. 10 pages llncs-style,

        before May, 15.

The submissions will be reviewed by the organizers and accepted
contributions will be included into the workshop notes that will be
made available at the workshop.

Note: all workshop participants are expected to register for the main
      CADE-15 conference.

Important Dates
---------------

Deadline for submissions:              15 May  1998
Notification of acceptance/rejection:  29 May  1998
Deadline for final text:               12 June 1998
Workshop:                              5  July 1998

Organisers
----------








Information
-----------


  or WWW:   http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~cade-15/

  or WWW: http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~peter/cade-15-ws/
or surface mail:
        Peter Baumgartner
        University of Koblenz-Landau
        Institute for Computer Science    
        Rheinau 1
        D-56075 Koblenz, Germany
        Phone: +49-261-9119-426
        Fax:   +49-261-9119-496

\documentstyle{article}
                            %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
                            %%       Call for Participation       %%
                            %%                                    %%
                            %%          CADE-Workshop on          %%
                            %%                                    %%
                            %%    Problem Solving Methodologies   %%
                            %%       with Automated Deduction     %%
                            %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

\def\head{
{\bf                              CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

Quote:
}\\[2mm]                                Workshop on

\\[2mm]{\huge\bf                   Problem-solving Methodologies  \\[1mm]
                  with Automated Deduction
Quote:
}\large\\[2mm]                              5 July 1998

%
\\                                  in conjunction with
                                          CADE-15
\\                 Fif{*filter*}th International Conference on Automated Deduction
\\[3mm]
{\bf                                  Lindau -- Germany

Quote:
}}

\def\body{
Recent examples have shown new practical applications of Automated
Deduction in various important domains.  There are successes
of automated theorem provers (ATPs) in planning, demonstrating that
ATPs can even outperform specialised planning systems.  In
model-based diagnosis, tableau-based proof procedures are used to
compute explanations of faulty circuits. In program verification, ATPs
are embedded to achieve a higher degree of automation.  In systems to
support software reuse, ATPs are used to identify modules from a
library to match a given specification.  In natural language
understanding ATP techniques are used to integrate world knowledge
into the interpretation process.  Finally, the Robbins algebra
success demonstrated how automated theorem provers can continue to
solve open mathematical problems.  

This workshop is intented to fall between a system competition and a
program consisting only of scientific talks. The workshop will
consider a set of examples, representative of different practical
domains, and analyse the effectiveness of different systems and
methodologies for solving each one.

Instead of measuring the raw power and speed of ATP systems over the
TPTP examples, we have a different focus: the solution of real-world
problems by ATP system designers plus their programs.

\sect{     SUBMISSIONS

Quote:
}

The workshop home page
        {\tt http://www.*-*-*.com/ \~{}peter/cade-15-ws/}
contains problem sets from domains {\em Mathematics\/},
{\em Software Verification\/}, {\em Reactive Systems Specification\/},
{\em Natural
Language Processing\/}, {\em Diagnosis\/} and {\em
  Planning\/}. Contributions may discuss one or more
of these workshop problems.

The paper to be submitted should consist of a description and analysis
of the whole solution process. That is, it should discuss:
\begin{itemize}
 \item how the problem is formulated within the system (language/logic),
 \item which inference methods are used within the system,
 \item what, if any, user interaction is required,
 \item how the system parameters are tuned to find a solution, and
 \item how the solution is presented by the system.
\end{itemize}
Hopefully, some problems will be solved by more than one system.
Hence there will be a chance to compare solutions and to discuss the
differences between the proof systems and methods of attack.

Contributions  dealing with a problem from  the
literature are also welcome, provided that they discuss the solution
process as proposed.

{\em Contribution format:\/}
        Postscript, max.\ 10 pages llncs-style,

        {\bf before May, 15}.
The submissions will be reviewed by the organizers and accepted
contributions will be included into the
workshop notes that will be made available at the workshop.

{\em Note:\/} all workshop participants are expected to register for the main
      CADE-15 conference.
\phantom{1}

Quote:
}

\long\def\pract{
\in{ORGANISERS:}{
\begin{itemize}
\item Peter Baumgartner \\ Universit{\"a}t Koblenz, Germany,\\

\item Ulrich Furbach \\ Universit{\"a}t Koblenz, Germany,\\

\item Michael Kohlhase \\ Universit{\"a}t des Saarlandes, Germany,\\

\item William McCune \\ Argonne National Laboratory, USA,\\

\item Wolfgang Reif \\ Universit{\"a}t Ulm, Germany,\\

\item Mark Stickel \\ SRI International, USA,\\

\item Tom{\'a}s  Uribe \\ Stanford University, USA,\\

\end{itemize}

Quote:
}

\in{             IMPORTANT DATES
Quote:
}{\begin{center}

\info{           Deadline for submissions:            }{15 May  1998}
\info{           Notification of acceptance/rejection:}{29 May  1998}
\info{           Deadline for final text:             }{12 June 1998}
\info{           Workshop:                            }{5  July 1998}
\end{center}}

\in{    INFORMATION

Quote:
}{\begin{center}


\info       {or WWW:}{ http://www.*-*-*.com/ .\\informatik.tu-darmstadt.de/\~{}cade-15/}

\info       {or WWW:}{ http://www.*-*-*.com/ \~{}peter/cade-15-ws/}
\info       {or surface mail:}           {Peter Baumgartner
\\                                        University of Koblenz-Landau
\\                                        Institute for Computer Science    
\\                                        Rheinau 1
\\                                        D-56075 Koblenz, Germany
\\                                      
...

read more »



Fri, 27 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'


writes:

Quote:
>I am intimately familiar with the work of Gans.  Nothing he
>did matches your description even approximately.  Why don't
>you admit that you don't even have his preprint?

Here is a public statement by Dr. Harold Gans in which he conforms
verifying the Witztum/Rips results, and confirms others statements
attributed to him in Michael Drosnin's book. The only thing he
disagrees with is using the codes to predict the future. I completely
agree with Dr. Gans on this: members.xoom.com/bcodes/public2.htm

Here is a technical discussion by Dr. Gans on the Statistical Science
experiment: members.xoom.com/bcodes/gans.htm

Here is an article about Dr. Gans' astonishing Bible codes finds:
   j51.com:80/~jrsflw/codes.htm Back to the Future

Currently the Bible codes software programs available  are of a
primitive, Model-T state, but I hope that developers will make
substantial improvements soon. Dr. Jeffrey Satinover, MD, in his
respected and acclaimed book _Cracking the Bible Codes_, hints at
something of which I've been thinking. Now Bible codes software
searches in two dimensional arrays. My guess is that awesome finds will
surface when arrays based on the angles of geometrical objects are
used. For example, hexagonal,  hexahedral and hexagramal shapes may
yield startling finds. Torah arrays in three dimensional shapes such as
the Tetrahedron should be experimented with. Hopefully, someone will
soon develop the kind of software that can make such searches.
Highlighting the English translation of Hebrew and Greek words found in
the matrix would help those of us who are weak in these languages.

Currently, programs look for a word or phrase with a certain skip
distance, say  299, the skip distance for the "Lady Di" find in Genesis
5:12. The program then divides the total letters of the Torah by 299 so
that the Hebrew word for her (lamed yod yod dalet yod dalet yod)  is
lined up in a column. One then looks for words nearby. In this case
"Lady Di" is crossed by  "lakachta et dami" (lamed kuf het tav aleph
tav dalet mem yod), which means  "you took my {*filter*}." Just to the right
is  "tzalam," the Hebrew word for photographer.

Many other such tight groupings have been found.    

Quote:
>You're funny.

Your profanity, name calling, emotionally troubled responses, etc.,
tell a revealing story of how you face the reality of Bible codes and
the prospect of hell.

Mark Hines



Fri, 27 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'


Quote:

>Currently the Bible codes software programs available  are of a
>primitive, Model-T state, but I hope that developers will make
>substantial improvements soon. Dr. Jeffrey Satinover, MD, in his
>respected and acclaimed book _Cracking the Bible Codes_, hints at
>something of which I've been thinking. Now Bible codes software
>searches in two dimensional arrays. My guess is that awesome finds will
>surface when arrays based on the angles of geometrical objects are
>used. For example, hexagonal,  hexahedral and hexagramal shapes may
>yield startling finds. Torah arrays in three dimensional shapes such as
>the Tetrahedron should be experimented with. Hopefully, someone will
>soon develop the kind of software that can make such searches.
>Highlighting the English translation of Hebrew and Greek words found in
>the matrix would help those of us who are weak in these languages.

>Currently, programs look for a word or phrase with a certain skip
>distance, say  299, the skip distance for the "Lady Di" find in Genesis
>5:12. The program then divides the total letters of the Torah by 299 so
>that the Hebrew word for her (lamed yod yod dalet yod dalet yod)  is
>lined up in a column. One then looks for words nearby. In this case
>"Lady Di" is crossed by  "lakachta et dami" (lamed kuf het tav aleph
>tav dalet mem yod), which means  "you took my {*filter*}." Just to the right
>is  "tzalam," the Hebrew word for photographer.

>Many other such tight groupings have been found.    

>>You're funny.

>Your profanity, name calling, emotionally troubled responses, etc.,
>tell a revealing story of how you face the reality of Bible codes and
>the prospect of hell.

>Mark Hines

Since you had to bring religion into a technical forum, here's my .02 worth:

Many such 'startling' finds have been found in texts of various religions and
mythologies.  That we could find random associations here surprises me not.
Can you say coincidence?

As for the arrogance of men who would believe that *their* beliefs are correct
and all others are incorrect, I have no comment. ;-)

Hell, indeed.  Mankind has made much finer hells than any myth could propose.

        --Arthur Corliss
          "Live Free or Die--the Only Way to Live" (NH State Motto)



Fri, 27 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'


Quote:

> Currently, programs look for a word or phrase with a certain skip
> distance, say  299, the skip distance for the "Lady Di" find in Genesis
> 5:12. The program then divides the total letters of the Torah by 299 so
> that the Hebrew word for her (lamed yod yod dalet yod dalet yod)  is
> lined up in a column. One then looks for words nearby. In this case
> "Lady Di" is crossed by  "lakachta et dami" (lamed kuf het tav aleph
> tav dalet mem yod), which means  "you took my {*filter*}." Just to the right
> is  "tzalam," the Hebrew word for photographer.

> Many other such tight groupings have been found.    

>>You're funny.

> Your profanity, name calling, emotionally troubled responses, etc.,
> tell a revealing story of how you face the reality of Bible codes and
> the prospect of hell.

> Mark Hines

have you tried to look for such groupings in other books of interests, like a phonebook? or the archives of the comp.* hierarchy?

I am pretty sure that you could find instances of such 'groupings' in any text whatsoever.. anybody would be interested in finding occurences of 'bible code' that would cross with 'bullshit' and 'ridiculous'?

laurent

PS: my profanity, name calling and whetever you wish to call my utterance is just an expression of my confidence in the power of wit over bigotry

--
Laurent Oget- http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~oget/



Sat, 28 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'

Quote:

>[...]

in his respected and acclaimed book _Cracking the Bible Codes_

[....]
----------------------

Boring.   http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~bdm/dilugim/moby.html shows how the same
"decoding" method, when used on the book Moby{*filter*}, has successfully
predicted the assassinations of many 20th century leaders.  Unfortunately,
the respected and acclaimed researchers who cracked Moby{*filter*} could find
no information about the present whereabouts of Elvis.  

RE



Sat, 28 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'

Quote:


> As for the arrogance of men who would believe that *their* beliefs are correct
> and all others are incorrect, I have no comment. ;-)

 Now come on. That statement is basically illogical to extremes.
 Why would somebody believe that somebody -else's- believes were
 correct and their own wasn't.  That's the kind of thinking that
 basically created the BIBLE CODES in the first place.

 ---
 Jim



Sat, 28 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'

Quote:


>writes:
>>I am intimately familiar with the work of Gans.  Nothing he
>>did matches your description even approximately.  Why don't
>>you admit that you don't even have his preprint?
>Here is a public statement by Dr. Harold Gans in which he conforms
>verifying the Witztum/Rips results, and confirms others statements
>attributed to him in Michael Drosnin's book. The only thing he
>disagrees with is using the codes to predict the future. I completely
>agree with Dr. Gans on this: members.xoom.com/bcodes/public2.htm
>Here is a technical discussion by Dr. Gans on the Statistical Science
>experiment: members.xoom.com/bcodes/gans.htm

>Here is an article about Dr. Gans' astonishing Bible codes finds:
>   j51.com:80/~jrsflw/codes.htm Back to the Future
>Currently the Bible codes software programs available  are of a
>primitive, Model-T state, but I hope that developers will make
>substantial improvements soon. Dr. Jeffrey Satinover, MD, in his
>respected and acclaimed book _Cracking the Bible Codes_, hints at
>something of which I've been thinking. Now Bible codes software
>searches in two dimensional arrays. My guess is that awesome finds will
>surface when arrays based on the angles of geometrical objects are
>used. For example, hexagonal,  hexahedral and hexagramal shapes may
>yield startling finds. Torah arrays in three dimensional shapes such as
>the Tetrahedron should be experimented with. Hopefully, someone will
>soon develop the kind of software that can make such searches.
>Highlighting the English translation of Hebrew and Greek words found in
>the matrix would help those of us who are weak in these languages.
>Currently, programs look for a word or phrase with a certain skip
>distance, say  299, the skip distance for the "Lady Di" find in Genesis
>5:12. The program then divides the total letters of the Torah by 299 so
>that the Hebrew word for her (lamed yod yod dalet yod dalet yod)  is
>lined up in a column. One then looks for words nearby. In this case
>"Lady Di" is crossed by  "lakachta et dami" (lamed kuf het tav aleph
>tav dalet mem yod), which means  "you took my {*filter*}." Just to the right
>is  "tzalam," the Hebrew word for photographer.
>Many other such tight groupings have been found.    
>>You're funny.
>Your profanity, name calling, emotionally troubled responses, etc.,
>tell a revealing story of how you face the reality of Bible codes and
>the prospect of hell.
>Mark Hines

Can you make anything of this text:

GaEaTa aAa aLaIaFaEa!

just my 2p



Sun, 29 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'


Quote:
>Your profanity, name calling, emotionally troubled responses, etc.,
>tell a revealing story of how you face the reality of Bible codes and
>the prospect of hell.

You talk of reality like you know what it means.

Bible codes are reality you say? Bah!
Perhaps you think they are some message from your god?

Why don't you show us your hell so we have to admit your right?

You can't because it does not exist. You are deluded and you have no
place posting messages in a scientific newsgroup.



Tue, 31 Oct 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'

...

Quote:
>Currently the Bible codes software programs available  are of a
>primitive, Model-T state, but I hope that developers will make
>substantial improvements soon. ...

I'm a Prolog programmer, a computational linguist who knows Hebrew and
Greek, and a Christian (last is not least here!), and I see no reason to
think the Bible code is anything but coincidence.  The way the Hebrew
language works, almost any string of random letters will spell something,
especially if it's allowed to be the transliterated name of a foreigner
whose name has no fixed Hebrew spelling.

The more directions you search in, the more coincidences you'll get.  That's
basic probability theory.

At the end of this message are references to some published reviews of _The
Bible Code_.  As far as I can tell, no knowledgeable scholars take it
seriously.

Quote:
>Your profanity, name calling, emotionally troubled responses, etc.,
>tell a revealing story of how you face the reality of Bible codes and
>the prospect of hell.
>Mark Hines

I don't engage in profanity, etc., but your desire to judge a person's
spirituality by his or her acceptance of the Bible codes makes it alarmingly
clear that, for you at least, the Bible code is a cult, not just a theory.

Please: NO EMAIL REPLIES.  Respond to the ongoing discussion in the
appropriate newsgroup.

- Michael Covington, Ph.D.
  Associate Director, Artificial Intelligence Center
  The University of Georgia
  http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~mc

----
From a message to me from Ted Lewis, Dept of Religion, U.Ga.:

Quote:
> I do know of one review to which you can point people.  It appeared in

_Bible Review_ August 1997, pp. 22-25.  Bible Review is more of a
popular magazine than a journal, but it does use scholars working
in the field rather than non-specialists.

Quote:
> The title of the article is "The Bible Code: Cracked and Crumbling".

Two scholars are chosen to refute the book.  Ron Hendel, a classmate of
mine
from Hvd,wrote a response (entitled "The Secret Code Hoax") from a biblical
scholar's viewpoint.  Sholomo Sternberg ("Snake Oil for Sale") wrote
from a scientist's point of view.  Sternberg is an orthodox rabbi who taught
Talmud for 45 years.  He is also a member of the Nat. Academy of Scientists
and holds the Putnam chair in Pure and Applied Mathematics at Harvard (do
you
know of him?). I've heard that he wrote a more detailed review in some
math journal which I will try to find. This short reply will do for the time
being.  Sternberg writes how the author of the Bible Code (Drosnin) was
quoted in Newsweek as asserting: " When my critics find a message about the
assassination of a prime minister encrypted in Moby{*filter*} I will believe
them."
Sternberg and an Australian prof took up the challenge and found 13 examples
in Moby{*filter*} including the shooting of Pres Somoza of Nicaragua and the
killing of Indira Gandhi.  Sternberg's point is that such ELS (equidistant
letter sequences) codes can be found everywhere in any sufficiently long
text.

And two more:

Quote:
> A. Jackson review in _Notices of the American Mathematical Society_ Sept

1997, pp. 935-939 (including another commentary by S. Sternberg)

Quote:
> a whole issue of _Jewish Action_ (vol 58 Spring 1998) devoted to the

topic (Jewish Action is published by the Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America).


Wed, 01 Nov 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'

Quote:


> >Your profanity, name calling, emotionally troubled responses, etc.,
> >tell a revealing story of how you face the reality of Bible codes and
> >the prospect of hell.
> You talk of reality like you know what it means.
> Bible codes are reality you say? Bah!
> Perhaps you think they are some message from your god?

If one were to try to shoot down these Bible Codes idiots for
once and for all, would attacking their claim of the Bible's
being unique in having such "hidden messages" be the approach,
maybe using a "Bible" consisting of few hundred KB of random
ASCII characters, or perhaps finding patently impossible messages
such as "Diana marries Donald Trump 1999" in the Bible? And what
database structures and/or artifical intelligence algorithms
would facilitate such searches? >=)

--

WARNING: I cannot be held responsible for the above        They're   coming  to
because  my cats have  apparently  learned to type.        take me away, ha ha!



Fri, 03 Nov 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 Reminder: CADE-15 WS 'Problem Solving...'

Quote:
>> Bible codes are reality you say? Bah!
>> Perhaps you think they are some message from your god?
>If one were to try to shoot down these Bible Codes idiots for
>once and for all, would attacking their claim of the Bible's
>being unique in having such "hidden messages" be the approach,
>maybe using a "Bible" consisting of few hundred KB of random
>ASCII characters, or perhaps finding patently impossible messages
>such as "Diana marries Donald Trump 1999" in the Bible? And what
>database structures and/or artifical intelligence algorithms
>would facilitate such searches? >=)

Would assassination predictions in "War and Peace" do?

http://cs.anu.edu.au/~bdm/dilugim/moby.html

For more information including a replication of the original (published)
experiment using War and Peace see:

http://cs.anu.edu.au/~bdm/dilugim/torah.html

Michael
PS. Now, can we *please* let this topic die (at least in the comp.* groups?)



Fri, 03 Nov 2000 03:00:00 GMT  
 
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