How do you pronounce "Perl"? 
Author Message
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?

Hello all,

This is probably a stupid question, but my native language is not
English, so please bear with me.

How do you pronounce "Perl"? Does it sound like "pearl" , or is the "e"
the same as the "e" in "help"?

Thanks,
Jan Pieter Kunst.-

--




Sun, 16 May 2004 06:23:47 GMT  
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?

Quote:
> This is probably a stupid question, but my native language is not
> English, so please bear with me.

> How do you pronounce "Perl"? Does it sound like "pearl" , or is the "e"
> the same as the "e" in "help"?

"perl" like "pearl" for me.

(some manuals alude to the legend that perl used to be spelled "pearl",
also, but that Larry didn't want to type all 4 characters...)

Tim Hammerquist
--
Let us be charitable, and call it a misleading feature  :-)



Sun, 16 May 2004 07:05:08 GMT  
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?

Jan> Hello all,
Jan> This is probably a stupid question, but my native language is not
Jan> English, so please bear with me.

Jan> How do you pronounce "Perl"? Does it sound like "pearl" , or is the "e"
Jan> the same as the "e" in "help"?

Larry says it like "pearl".  The other one would sound to me like
"peril", which amazingly is what FrameMaker always wants to
spell-correct it as until I tell it "no". :)

print "Just another Perl hacker,"
--
Randal L. Schwartz - Stonehenge Consulting Services, Inc. - +1 503 777 0095

Perl/Unix/security consulting, Technical writing, Comedy, etc. etc.
See PerlTraining.Stonehenge.com for onsite and open-enrollment Perl training!



Sun, 16 May 2004 15:54:38 GMT  
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?

Quote:

> > How do you pronounce "Perl"?

> Larry says it like "pearl".

That should settle it. "Pearl" it is. Thanks!

JP

--




Sun, 16 May 2004 18:56:59 GMT  
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?


Quote:
>..
>Larry says it like "pearl".  The other one would sound to me like
>"peril", which amazingly is what FrameMaker always wants to
>spell-correct it as until I tell it "no". :)

There was a Scottish presenter at TPC a couple years
ago who said "peril" instead of "pearl". I had to bite
my tongue to avoid offering a tip about the correct
pronunciation :)

--
Charles DeRykus



Mon, 17 May 2004 02:08:57 GMT  
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?

Quote:
>> On Thu, 29 Nov 2001 01:08:57 GMT,



>> ..  Larry says it like "pearl".  The other one would
>> sound to me like "peril", which amazingly is what
>> FrameMaker always wants to spell-correct it as until I
>> tell it "no". :)
> There was a Scottish presenter at TPC a couple years ago
> who said "peril" instead of "pearl". I had to bite my
> tongue to avoid offering a tip about the correct
> pronunciation :)

Some Scottish speakers insert a vowel between "r" and "l"
in words, e.g. "world" is pronounced as "wo'ruld".

So for them, "peril" is quite acceptable for "perl".

Is this on-topic? :-)

hth
t
--
Oh!  I've said too much.  Smithers, use the amnesia ray.



Mon, 17 May 2004 02:38:00 GMT  
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?

Quote:

> Some Scottish speakers insert a vowel between "r" and "l"
> in words, e.g. "world" is pronounced as "wo'ruld".

> So for them, "peril" is quite acceptable for "perl".

We may be observing a vestige of Irish/Gaelic.  In those languages, I
believe one phonological rule is this: you can't have two sonorant
consonants (l, m, n, r) in a row.  There must be a vowel sound between
them.  Perul.  Filum.  Firum.  

Quote:
> Is this on-topic? :-)

Let me ask a question...

     $pronunciation =~ s/([lmnr])([lmnr])/$1u$2/g;

almost works, except for double consonants, which don't require the
extra vowel sound.  

Is there a way to write the substitution on one line so that it will
exclude double consonants?

--Shawn



Mon, 17 May 2004 07:59:47 GMT  
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?

Quote:



>> Some Scottish speakers insert a vowel between "r" and "l"
>> in words, e.g. "world" is pronounced as "wo'ruld".

>> So for them, "peril" is quite acceptable for "perl".

> We may be observing a vestige of Irish/Gaelic.  In those languages, I
> believe one phonological rule is this: you can't have two sonorant
> consonants (l, m, n, r) in a row.  There must be a vowel sound between
> them.  Perul.  Filum.  Firum.  

>> Is this on-topic? :-)

> Let me ask a question...

>      $pronunciation =~ s/([lmnr])([lmnr])/$1u$2/g;

> almost works, except for double consonants, which don't require the
> extra vowel sound.  

> Is there a way to write the substitution on one line so that it will
> exclude double consonants?

s/([lmnr])([lmnr])/$1 ne $2 ? "$1u$2" : "$1$2"/eg;

Cheers,
Bernard



Mon, 17 May 2004 08:15:54 GMT  
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?

Quote:


> > Some Scottish speakers insert a vowel between "r" and "l"
> > in words, e.g. "world" is pronounced as "wo'ruld".

> > So for them, "peril" is quite acceptable for "perl".

> We may be observing a vestige of Irish/Gaelic.  In those languages, I
> believe one phonological rule is this: you can't have two sonorant
> consonants (l, m, n, r) in a row.  There must be a vowel sound between
> them.  Perul.  Filum.  Firum.

> > Is this on-topic? :-)

> Let me ask a question...

>      $pronunciation =~ s/([lmnr])([lmnr])/$1u$2/g;

> almost works, except for double consonants, which don't require the
> extra vowel sound.

> Is there a way to write the substitution on one line so that it will
> exclude double consonants?

s/([lmnr])([lmnr])/$1 eq $2?"$1$2":"$1u$2"/eg;

Wyzelli
--
($a,$b,$w,$t)=(' bottle',' of beer',' on the wall','Take one down, pass it
around');
for(reverse(1..100)){$s=($_!=1)?'s':'';$c.="$_$a$s$b$w\n$_$a$s$b\n$t\n";
$_--;$s=($_!=1)?'s':'';$c.="$_$a$s$b$w\n\n";}print"$c*hic*";



Mon, 17 May 2004 08:20:19 GMT  
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?

  SO> Let me ask a question...

  SO>      $pronunciation =~ s/([lmnr])([lmnr])/$1u$2/g;

  SO> almost works, except for double consonants, which don't require the
  SO> extra vowel sound.  

  SO> Is there a way to write the substitution on one line so that it will
  SO> exclude double consonants?

perl -pe 's/([lmnr])(?!\1)([lmnr])/$1u$2/g'

this fails when a double consonant is followed by another of those
consonants. but does 'rrm' or 'llr' actually occur?

uri

--

-- Stem is an Open Source Network Development Toolkit and Application Suite -
----- Stem and Perl Development, Systems Architecture, Design and Coding ----
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Mon, 17 May 2004 08:34:31 GMT  
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?


Quote:
>Let me ask a question...

>     $pronunciation =~ s/([lmnr])([lmnr])/$1u$2/g;

>almost works, except for double consonants, which don't require the
>extra vowel sound.  

You mean like "bummer", which you don't want translated to "bumumer"?

What about "solemn"?  Should it be pronounced like the name of one of
the kings of Israel?  I could make a similar comment about "hymn".  But
then there is also "damnation", the first four letters of which are
pronounced differently than the word "damn".  Do Scottish speakers add
a vowel if the syllable boundary falls between the two consonants?

Of course, you really have to know whether the consonants are actually
both pronounced, and whether the letters are the same is only a
heuristic for that.  The presence of the letters "l", "m", "n", and "r"
in the spelling of a word doesn't necessarily even imply that the
corresponding consonants exist in the pronunciation of the word.  The
only example I can think of right now is "could", but it feels like
there should be an example with "r" in it as well (since "r" and "l"
are closely related.)

Also, maybe you should check for "ng" followed by any of those four
letters, since in English sometimes "ng" stands for a consonant that's
sort of like "n" but with a different (further back) part of the tongue
touching the roof of the mouth.  I don't know you about you, but I
don't always actually make a real "g" sound when saying "hangman",
"Langley", or "ringmaster".

Quote:
>Is there a way to write the substitution on one line so that it will
>exclude double consonants?

How about this?

        $pronunciation =~ s/([lmnr])(?!\1)([lmnr])/$1u$2/g;

That's the first time I've ever really used a zero-width negative
lookahead assertion, despite the fact that I remember being one of
the ones suggesting zero-width lookahead assertions when Larry was
thinking up ideas of what to include in Perl 5 back in 1994.  Hey, it
only took me about 7.5 years to actually get around to using it...

  - Logan
--
"In order to be prepared to hope in what does not deceive,
 we must first lose hope in everything that deceives."

                                          Georges Bernanos



Mon, 17 May 2004 08:42:48 GMT  
 How do you pronounce "Perl"?


Quote:

>  SO> Let me ask a question...

>  SO>      $pronunciation =~ s/([lmnr])([lmnr])/$1u$2/g;

>  SO> almost works, except for double consonants, which don't require the
>  SO> extra vowel sound.  

>  SO> Is there a way to write the substitution on one line so that it will
>  SO> exclude double consonants?

>perl -pe 's/([lmnr])(?!\1)([lmnr])/$1u$2/g'

>this fails when a double consonant is followed by another of those
>consonants. but does 'rrm' or 'llr' actually occur?

Well:

        $ perl -ne 'print if /([lmnr])\1[lmnr]/i' /usr/dict/words | fmt
        ballroom bellman bellmen hallmark hillman hillmen Pullman Ullman
        $

But I think these are all OK, because the "ll" in each case is
pronounced like a single "l", so maybe turning "ballroom" into
"balluroom" is the desired effect.  (Unless what I said in another
post about syllable breaks is true.)

Also, just for fun:

        $ perl -ne 'print if /[lmnr]([lmnr])\1/i' /usr/dict/words | fmt
        filmmake
        $

I don't think I've ever heard anyone say "filmmake".  I guess this is
the /usr/dict/words way of recognizing "filmmaker".

  - Logan
--
"In order to be prepared to hope in what does not deceive,
 we must first lose hope in everything that deceives."

                                          Georges Bernanos



Mon, 17 May 2004 08:50:51 GMT  
 
 [ 12 post ] 

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