command trace in perl (4.003) 
Author Message
 command trace in perl (4.003)

I've got a simple perl script that loops indefinitely (intentionally).  The
first several times through the loop, everything is fine.  At some
semmingly random point, the program stops because it's waiting for
terminal input (it runs in the background).  

Since I only print information with this program and don't ask for input,
I thought I'd try the -D8 or -D14 option to trace through the execution and
find the problem.  I rebuilt perl with the -DDEBUGGING option and I get no
debugging output.  Is there more to the -D option than is described in the
nutshell book?

Here's a sample program:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
#! /usr/bin/perl -D14

$TRUE = 1;

while ($TRUE) {
   print "hello\n";
   sleep (10);

Quote:
}

exit 0;  
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
what should I see with the execution trace running?  

Thanks for advice.

Pete
______________________

weeg computing center |  
university of iowa    |
iowa city, ia 52242___|



Tue, 28 Nov 1995 02:22:42 GMT  
 command trace in perl (4.003)

|>I've got a simple perl script that loops indefinitely (intentionally).  The
|>first several times through the loop, everything is fine.  At some
|>semmingly random point, the program stops because it's waiting for
|>terminal input (it runs in the background).  
|>
|>Since I only print information with this program and don't ask for input,
|>I thought I'd try the -D8 or -D14 option to trace through the execution and
|>find the problem.  I rebuilt perl with the -DDEBUGGING option and I get no
|>debugging output.  Is there more to the -D option than is described in the
|>nutshell book?

I don't know whether this helps you, but it is a useful hint:

I often use the perl de{*filter*} to get a full execution trace, by executing
my script with 'perl -dS scriptname arguments' and then setting 't' (trace
mode) on, and then simply using 'c' to continue without any breakpoints.
I then get a full list of all perl statements, and I can see exactly what's
executing.

Lezz



Tue, 28 Nov 1995 22:27:07 GMT  
 command trace in perl (4.003)

: I've got a simple perl script that loops indefinitely (intentionally).  The
: first several times through the loop, everything is fine.  At some
: semmingly random point, the program stops because it's waiting for
: terminal input (it runs in the background).  
:
: Since I only print information with this program and don't ask for input,
: I thought I'd try the -D8 or -D14 option to trace through the execution and
: find the problem.  I rebuilt perl with the -DDEBUGGING option and I get no
: debugging output.  Is there more to the -D option than is described in the
: nutshell book?
:
: Here's a sample program:
: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
: #! /usr/bin/perl -D14
:
: $TRUE = 1;
:
: while ($TRUE) {
:    print "hello\n";
:    sleep (10);
: }
:
: exit 0;  
: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
: what should I see with the execution trace running?  

Putting -D14 on the #! line only works if one of two things is true:

        1) Your kernel or shell is interpreting the #! line.

        2) You're running Perl 5.

Since you aren't doing 2, I suspect that 1 isn't true.  How are you
invoking the script?

Larry



Wed, 29 Nov 1995 03:14:44 GMT  
 
 [ 3 post ] 

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