Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"? 
Author Message
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?

Does anyone know who to attribute that to?  I first saw it in this
newsgroup, and have been wondering where it originated.

(Please Cc via email)



Fri, 30 Sep 2005 11:23:21 GMT  
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?

Quote:
>["Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"]
> Does anyone know who to attribute that to?  I first saw it in this
> newsgroup, and have been wondering where it originated.

This is a modification of "Those who don't understand Unix are
condemned to reinvent it, poorly" (that seems to be the most
frequently used version of his quote, anyway), attributed to Henry
Spencer. I guess that several people came up with the adoption to Lisp
independently.

For a similar, all-Lisp quote, see Greenspun's Tenth Rule of
Programming: "Any sufficiently complicated C or fortran program
contains an ad-hoc, informally-specified bug-ridden slow
implementation of half of Common Lisp."

Regards
Henrik



Fri, 30 Sep 2005 12:57:15 GMT  
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?

Quote:

> Does anyone know who to attribute that to?  I first saw it in this
> newsgroup, and have been wondering where it originated.

> (Please Cc via email)

I've heard that before. It sounds like Paul Graham to me.

<A HREF="http://www.paulgraham.com/>http://www.paulgraham.com/</A>

Possibly Guy Steele, Jr., but my money's on Graham.

Jason



Fri, 30 Sep 2005 12:02:34 GMT  
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?

Quote:

> This is a modification of "Those who don't understand Unix are
> condemned to reinvent it, poorly" (that seems to be the most
> frequently used version of his quote, anyway), attributed to Henry
> Spencer.

And this one is a new version of "Thos who don't understand history
are condemned to repeat it".


Fri, 30 Sep 2005 13:58:19 GMT  
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?

Quote:

> This is a modification of "Those who don't understand Unix are
> condemned to reinvent it, poorly" (that seems to be the most
> frequently used version of his quote, anyway), attributed to Henry
> Spencer.

And this one is a new version of "Those who don't understand history
are condemned to repeat it".


Fri, 30 Sep 2005 13:58:29 GMT  
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?


Quote:

>> This is a modification of "Those who don't understand Unix are
>> condemned to reinvent it, poorly" (that seems to be the most
>> frequently used version of his quote, anyway), attributed to Henry
>> Spencer.

>And this one is a new version of "Those who don't understand history
>are condemned to repeat it".

"Those that do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it." -
Santayana

Thank God no one's replaced "history" with "lisp" in these
quotes, though:

"The only thing we learn from history is that we learn nothing from
history." - Hegel

"History is more or less bunk." - Henry Ford

--Sashank



Fri, 30 Sep 2005 22:51:07 GMT  
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?
And of course there's the related maxim:

 Greenspun's Tenth Rule of Programming: "Any sufficiently complicated
 C or Fortran program contains an ad-hoc, informally-specified
 bug-ridden slow implementation of half of Common Lisp."

 Source: http://philip.greenspun.com/research/



Fri, 30 Sep 2005 23:10:44 GMT  
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?

Quote:


> > This is a modification of "Those who don't understand Unix are
> > condemned to reinvent it, poorly" (that seems to be the most
> > frequently used version of his quote, anyway), attributed to Henry
> > Spencer.

> And this one is a new version of "Those who don't understand history
> are condemned to repeat it".

From `The Columbia World of Quotations':

`Those who cannot remember their past are condemned to repeat it.'
    -- George Santayana (1863-1952)
       Life of Reason, 'Reason in Common Sense', ch. 12 (1905-6)

William L. Shirer made these words the epigraph for his Rise and Fall
of the Third Reich (1959)



Fri, 30 Sep 2005 23:37:45 GMT  
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?

Quote:


>> > This is a modification of "Those who don't understand Unix are
>> > condemned to reinvent it, poorly" (that seems to be the most
>> > frequently used version of his quote, anyway), attributed to Henry
>> > Spencer.

>> And this one is a new version of "Those who don't understand history
>> are condemned to repeat it".

> From `The Columbia World of Quotations':

> `Those who cannot remember their past are condemned to repeat it.'
>     -- George Santayana (1863-1952)
>        Life of Reason, 'Reason in Common Sense', ch. 12 (1905-6)

> William L. Shirer made these words the epigraph for his Rise and Fall
> of the Third Reich (1959)

.. But I seem to recall Santayana recognizing that it was a quote
from someone much earlier, like Pliny or Tacitus or such...  (e.g. -
someone that died considerably more than a thousand years before Lisp
was discovered...)
--

http://www.ntlug.org/~cbbrowne/oses.html
I'm not born again -- my mother got it right the first time.


Sat, 01 Oct 2005 04:56:12 GMT  
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?

Quote:




>>>>This is a modification of "Those who don't understand Unix are
>>>>condemned to reinvent it, poorly" (that seems to be the most
>>>>frequently used version of his quote, anyway), attributed to Henry
>>>>Spencer.

>>>And this one is a new version of "Those who don't understand history
>>>are condemned to repeat it".

>>From `The Columbia World of Quotations':

>>`Those who cannot remember their past are condemned to repeat it.'
>>    -- George Santayana (1863-1952)
>>       Life of Reason, 'Reason in Common Sense', ch. 12 (1905-6)

>>William L. Shirer made these words the epigraph for his Rise and Fall
>>of the Third Reich (1959)

> .. But I seem to recall Santayana recognizing that it was a quote
> from someone much earlier, like Pliny or Tacitus or such...  (e.g. -
> someone that died considerably more than a thousand years before Lisp
> was discovered...)

fwiw, my bartlett's cross-references any cases of similar quotations,
and santayana's stands without footnote. come to think of it, if it was
someone else's they would have attributed it to them.

while researching this (to avoid starting my taxes) I learned from Pliny
the Elder how to swim faster (fill my mouth with olive oil and dribble
it out as I go), and perhaps a tip on how better to program software:
"Why is it that we entertain the belief that for every purpose odd
numbers are the most effectual?" (cross-referenced to Virgil's "The god
delights in an odd number.").

Pliny the Younger's best was explaining why it took me 49 years living
within 5 miles of the Statue of Liberty to first land on its island:
"Objects which are usually the motives of our travels by land and by sea
are often neglected if they lie under our eye."

In Tacitus I found only commentary on USA-Iraq, Game Two:

"The gods are on the side of the stronger."

"Where [the Romans] make a desert, they call it peace."

"It is the rare fortune these days that a man may think what he likes
and say what he thinks."

--

  kenny tilton
  clinisys, inc
  http://www.tilton-technology.com/
  ---------------------------------------------------------------
"Everything is a cell." -- Alan Kay



Sat, 01 Oct 2005 06:38:29 GMT  
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?

Quote:
> Does anyone know who to attribute that to?  I first saw it in this
> newsgroup, and have been wondering where it originated.

I didn't originate this one, but I wrote something similar into my sig quote
collection quite some time ago:

        Those who do not understand LISP are condemned to not even being able
        to reinvent it poorly.  -- Far, without apologies to Henry Spencer.

It is of course a reference to the fortune cookie:
        Those who do not understand Unix are condemned to reinvent it, poorly.
                -- Henry Spencer

Which itself may be a reference to earlier quotes.

[ Fran?ois-Ren DVB Rideau | Reflection&{*filter*}nethics | http://www.*-*-*.com/ ]
[  TUNES project for a Free Reflective Computing System  | http://www.*-*-*.com/  ]
"To {*filter*}! The cause of... and solution to all of life's problems!"
        -- Homer Simpson, quoted by H. Duray about {*filter*}ion to Government



Sat, 01 Oct 2005 09:25:53 GMT  
 Who first said "Those who do not study Lisp are doomed to reimplement it, poorly"?


Quote:
> `Those who cannot remember their past are condemned to repeat it.'
>     -- George Santayana (1863-1952)
>        Life of Reason, 'Reason in Common Sense', ch. 12 (1905-6)

"Invent a clever saying, and your name shall live forever"
      -- Anonymous

--
Coby Beck

(one of my favorites! --not original)



Sat, 01 Oct 2005 13:59:38 GMT  
 
 [ 12 post ] 

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