Advise on getting started 
Author Message
 Advise on getting started

I have programmed with AutoCAD's AutoLISP and Visual Lisp for many years,
but I would now like to use lisp within Windows for simple file management
and system admin type duties. Can any of you advise on which
IDE/Interpreters I should be considering and any books or online docs I
could use to get started. Any help will be appreciated

Thanks, Steve



Mon, 12 Jul 2004 08:07:50 GMT  
 Advise on getting started

Quote:

> I have programmed with AutoCAD's AutoLISP and Visual Lisp for many years,
> but I would now like to use lisp within Windows for simple file management
> and system admin type duties. Can any of you advise on which
> IDE/Interpreters I should be considering and any books or online docs I
> could use to get started. Any help will be appreciated

> Thanks, Steve

FWIW I like "Object Oriented Common Lisp" and it comes with a chapter
on file stuff: write, read, create, manipulate path/file info.  For
the rest the implementation documentations/hyperspec should have all
the details you need

marc



Mon, 12 Jul 2004 09:24:23 GMT  
 Advise on getting started

Quote:

> I have programmed with AutoCAD's AutoLISP and Visual Lisp for many years,
> but I would now like to use lisp within Windows for simple file management
> and system admin type duties. Can any of you advise on which
> IDE/Interpreters I should be considering and any books or online docs I
> could use to get started. Any help will be appreciated

I have the same background that you
(Autocad+Autolisp).

I suggest Clisp as interpreter and Emacs as
IDE/Editor. Emacs may be hard to learn but is
customizable with lisp (Emacs lisp) just like
Autocad. Use www.google.com to search for theese
programs.

Warning: After using Common Lisp for a while
Autolisp will look like a toy language and some
frustration will arise  :)

--

Eduardo Mu?oz



Tue, 13 Jul 2004 02:17:05 GMT  
 Advise on getting started

Quote:

> I suggest Clisp as interpreter and Emacs as
> IDE/Editor. Emacs may be hard to learn but is
> customizable with lisp (Emacs lisp) just like
> Autocad. Use www.google.com to search for theese
> programs.

Could you point me to some information on how to set this combination up (on
windowsxp). I am just starting with lisp (from Delphi) and i am having some
difficulty in figuring how you set it up, and use it, for interpreted and
compiling use, any help would be gratefully appreciated.

David



Thu, 15 Jul 2004 19:28:54 GMT  
 Advise on getting started
On Sun, 27 Jan 2002 11:28:54 -0000, "David Fisher"

Quote:

>d you point me to some information on how to set this combination up (on
>windowsxp). I am just starting with lisp (from Delphi) and i am having some
>difficulty in figuring how you set it up, and use it, for interpreted and
>compiling use, any help would be gratefully appreciated.

>David

Clisp is not hard to setup, but emacs can be a {*filter*}.
The thing is that you also get a lot of power from emacs that way.
Basically there is a .emacs in your home directory which is a lisp
file with emacs macros and customisations ( you can customise much
from within emacs now, but I think it's {*filter*}). What I like to do
is put all my setup in one directory, use enviromental variables for
the location dependent stuff and then call the main setup from .emacs.
That way I can move my setup from one computer to another.
( I even create a buffer where I store a list of the environmental
variables that I don't define. Makes it easier to set them. )
Emacs itself is easy to use. Cursor keys move the cursor. C-x C-s
saves C-x C-c exits C-x C-w writes. There are customisations that
make it work a lot like windows programs ( C-z for undo, a package
that lets C-tab move you through different "buffers"--a buffer is like
a file that is open in your emacs session).
You can split you window so you can cut and paste ( God forbid you
copy and paste ) between two files. You can also compile and run
programs from inside emacs and open files based on errors. I have used
it that way with C++Builder, I believe you can do the same for
Delphi.
The one problem with emacs is that it has so many very useful features
that you will spend years learning them all.


Thu, 15 Jul 2004 20:25:30 GMT  
 Advise on getting started

Quote:

> Could you point me to some information on how to set this combination up (on
> windowsxp). I am just starting with lisp (from Delphi) and i am having some
> difficulty in figuring how you set it up, and use it, for interpreted and
> compiling use, any help would be gratefully appreciated.

You can find Clisp here:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/clisp/

Once you decompress the file, follow the
instruction given in the file README.

You can find info for Emacs on windows here:

http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/windows/ntemacs.html

Emacs installation is easy. Uncommpress the
distribution file with winzip or something
(disable CR/LF translation in winzip) to the
desired location. Again, follow the instruction in
the file README.W32.

When you have both runnig ask here again (I'm
short of time right now  :)

--

Eduardo Mu?oz



Fri, 16 Jul 2004 03:48:11 GMT  
 Advise on getting started

Quote:
> On Sun, 27 Jan 2002 11:28:54 -0000, "David Fisher"

>>d you point me to some information on how to set this combination up (on
>>windowsxp). I am just starting with lisp (from Delphi) and i am having some
>>difficulty in figuring how you set it up, and use it, for interpreted and
>>compiling use, any help would be gratefully appreciated.

>>David

> Clisp is not hard to setup, but emacs can be a {*filter*}.
> The thing is that you also get a lot of power from emacs that way.
> Basically there is a .emacs in your home directory which is a lisp
> file with emacs macros and customisations ( you can customise much
> from within emacs now, but I think it's {*filter*}).

Hmm. It's OK for faces, I think, but I don't think Customize is a good
solution for most other things. (It's not very necessary for faces,
either, with color-themes, and I've just used the face-manipulation
functions without difficulties.)

Quote:
> What I like to do
> is put all my setup in one directory, use enviromental variables for
> the location dependent stuff and then call the main setup from .emacs.
> That way I can move my setup from one computer to another.

Hmm. Good solution, but I think perhaps a better way would be to have
a file containing assignments (an Elisp file,that is), and then load
the file - then you don't have to remember to export the environment
variables on each workstation (you can use {*filter*} to snarf the file
remotely from similar systems).

Quote:
> ( I even create a buffer where I store a list of the environmental
> variables that I don't define. Makes it easier to set them. )
> Emacs itself is easy to use. Cursor keys move the cursor. C-x C-s
> saves C-x C-c exits C-x C-w writes. There are customisations that
> make it work a lot like windows programs ( C-z for undo, a package
> that lets C-tab move you through different "buffers"--a buffer is like
> a file that is open in your emacs session).

Hmm. A buffer is more like a file's contents in memory - you're not
really manipulating the file, just the buffer - until you save the
file. Also, not all buffers actually correspond to files. I know that
that's not as simple for newbies, but they should be aware that at
some level a buffer is not just an open file.

Quote:
> You can split you window so you can cut and paste ( God forbid you
> copy and paste ) between two files.

Emacs calls those functions kill, copy, and yank - that should satisfy
Ted Neslon :).

Quote:
> You can also compile and run
> programs from inside emacs and open files based on errors. I have used
> it that way with C++Builder, I believe you can do the same for
> Delphi.
> The one problem with emacs is that it has so many very useful features
> that you will spend years learning them all.

Regards,
--

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        Linux Is Not Unix                        X  No MS-Word in mail
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Wed, 21 Jul 2004 10:13:47 GMT  
 
 [ 7 post ] 

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