Schemely graphing calculators? 
Author Message
 Schemely graphing calculators?

I'm trying to brush up on some higher math through
private reading and am looking to get a graphing
calculator to help me along.  The only calculators I've
used so far are "scientific" (ie, +-*/, trig, log, hyp,
and stats on single-var lists).  I like the promise of
visualizing complicated functions on the x,y-plane (or
x,y,z-space), and the ability to do numeric integration
and matrix manipulation, but I'm not really looking for
a "student" calculator, with menu'd lessons and such.
Also, I'd like a machine whose programming language is
as Scheme-like in feel, if not in syntax.  Is this too
tall an order?  If not, what brand/model would
you recommend?  Thanks.

--d  

ps: Does it have to be a calculator?  Yes.  My
discretionary reading time is rather scattered these
days and may not be near a real computer running
MzScheme, CLISP, Gnuplot and suchlike.



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 04:49:59 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?
Try

Option 1:

http://www.lispme.de/lispme/

A Scheme system for the palm OS.  As for a graphing calculator, I do not
know.  In general, garphing calculators are extremely limited and can only
approximate an actual graph.  Sometimes its best to stick with the actually
equation and leave the visualization out of it.

Option 2:

Mathematica for the Palm??

http://www.wolfram.com/products/mathematica/

Runs on Linux, was there not a PDA linux system somewhere?

Option 3:

Get a laptop  and install whatever you need.  Macsyma, Mathematica, ....
you get the idea.

Option 4:  (The best)

Higher mathematics reading usually does not need the use of a calculator.
Answers are always exact and learning to do everything by hand exercises the
brain.  I do not think Einstein or Gauss or Fermat or Newton or Laplace or
Poincare or Euler or Galois or Hilbert needed a calculator.  You probably do
not either.

Wade


Quote:
> I'm trying to brush up on some higher math through
> private reading and am looking to get a graphing
> calculator to help me along.  The only calculators I've
> used so far are "scientific" (ie, +-*/, trig, log, hyp,
> and stats on single-var lists).  I like the promise of
> visualizing complicated functions on the x,y-plane (or
> x,y,z-space), and the ability to do numeric integration
> and matrix manipulation, but I'm not really looking for
> a "student" calculator, with menu'd lessons and such.
> Also, I'd like a machine whose programming language is
> as Scheme-like in feel, if not in syntax.  Is this too
> tall an order?  If not, what brand/model would
> you recommend?  Thanks.

> --d

> ps: Does it have to be a calculator?  Yes.  My
> discretionary reading time is rather scattered these
> days and may not be near a real computer running
> MzScheme, CLISP, Gnuplot and suchlike.



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 05:09:25 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?
It sounds like you've never used a graphing calculator...  One good one
is the TI-86, which provides just about anything you could want. (the
TI-89 and TI-92 have more, but are more complicated to use).  The TI-86
is not schemish at all (programming language much like BASIC).
However...  you could probably write a scheme interpreter in some
dialect of C, compile it to TI-86 machine code, and then transfer it to
the calculator....  There are compilers for this, but I have no info.
It is even possible that someone has already written a scheme
interpreter for the TI-86, but I wouldn't know about such things.

Quote:

> I'm trying to brush up on some higher math through
> private reading and am looking to get a graphing
> calculator to help me along.  The only calculators I've
> used so far are "scientific" (ie, +-*/, trig, log, hyp,
> and stats on single-var lists).  I like the promise of
> visualizing complicated functions on the x,y-plane (or
> x,y,z-space), and the ability to do numeric integration
> and matrix manipulation, but I'm not really looking for
> a "student" calculator, with menu'd lessons and such.
> Also, I'd like a machine whose programming language is
> as Scheme-like in feel, if not in syntax.  Is this too
> tall an order?  If not, what brand/model would
> you recommend?  Thanks.

> --d

> ps: Does it have to be a calculator?  Yes.  My
> discretionary reading time is rather scattered these
> days and may not be near a real computer running
> MzScheme, CLISP, Gnuplot and suchlike.

--
/Times-Bold 40 selectfont/n{moveto}def/m{gsave true charpath clip 72
400 n 300 -4 1{dup 160 300 3 -1 roll 0 360 arc 300 div 1 1 sethsbcolor
fill}for grestore 0 -60 rmoveto}def 72 500 n(This message has been)m
(brought to you by the)m(letter alpha and the number pi.)m(David Feuer)



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 05:03:48 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?

Quote:

> Option 4:  (The best)

> Higher mathematics reading usually does not need the use of a calculator.
> Answers are always exact and learning to do everything by hand exercises the
> brain.  I do not think Einstein or Gauss or Fermat or Newton or Laplace or
> Poincare or Euler or Galois or Hilbert needed a calculator.  You probably do
> not either.

No offense intended (and honestly, someone would have to be pretty
full of themselves for this to be offensive :), but I'm pretty sure
Dorai isn't quite an Einstein or Gauss.  If someone thinks that modern
technology can help them learn something better, well, I say they
should use it.  We live in the 21st century, we get get no choice
about the bad stuff, so we should take full advantage of the good
stuff.

You might want to check out HP calculators, they use a stack-based
postfix syntax.



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 06:27:28 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?

Quote:

> Get a laptop  and install whatever you need.  Macsyma, Mathematica, ....
> you get the idea.

No Macsyma.  It got reabsorbed into Symbolics who then stopped talking
about distributing it.  It *was* ported to Windows, Linux, Mac, and
misc Unices, as well as Genera.

Anyone heard the status of Macsyma lately?

'james

--

Lambda Unlimited: Recursion 'R' Us   |  |/  | USA, 61.2069 N, 149.766 W,
Y = \f.(\x.f(xx)) (\x.f(xx))         |  |\  | Earth, Sol System,
Y(F) = F(Y(F))                        \_,-_/  Milky Way.



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 07:11:17 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?

<snip>

Quote:
> Option 2:

> Mathematica for the Palm??

> http://www.wolfram.com/products/mathematica/

> Runs on Linux, was there not a PDA linux system somewhere?

<snip>

Yes.  It's called the Agenda  (www.agendacomputing.com).  A friend of
mine has one and likes it.  I seriously doubt it has anywhere near the
processing capability necessary to run Mathematica (it has to be slow to
save battery power).  However, there is a scheme interpreter available
for it.  The scheme interpreter does not support graphics, but it is
open source, so it probably would not be _too_ hard to add minimal
graphics support. Of course, you'd have to write your own calculator,
but since you seem to like programming scheme, that shouldn't be a
problem  ;-).

--
/Times-Bold 40 selectfont/n{moveto}def/m{gsave true charpath clip 72
400 n 300 -4 1{dup 160 300 3 -1 roll 0 360 arc 300 div 1 1 sethsbcolor
fill}for grestore 0 -60 rmoveto}def 72 500 n(This message has been)m
(brought to you by the)m(letter alpha and the number pi.)m(David Feuer)



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 07:10:33 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?

Quote:
> graphics support. Of course, you'd have to write your own calculator,
> but since you seem to like programming scheme, that shouldn't be a
> problem  ;-).

Cough, sputter, .......

SEEM to like programming in Scheme!  Aaaagh!  Of all the things to be tagged
with in this forum.

Not for a long time, CL forever! :-)  LOL

Wade



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 07:22:47 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?

Quote:

> > graphics support. Of course, you'd have to write your own calculator,
> > but since you seem to like programming scheme, that shouldn't be a
> > problem  ;-).

> Cough, sputter, .......

> SEEM to like programming in Scheme!  Aaaagh!  Of all the things to be tagged
> with in this forum.

Silly, this is cross-posted to both c.l.scheme and c.l.lisp.  Not that
those pot-smoking communist hippie Scheme freaks care. ;-)

Quote:
> Not for a long time, CL forever! :-)  LOL

(all-praise-common-lisp?) => #t

'james

--

Lambda Unlimited: Recursion 'R' Us   |  |/  | USA, 61.2069 N, 149.766 W,
Y = \f.(\x.f(xx)) (\x.f(xx))         |  |\  | Earth, Sol System,
Y(F) = F(Y(F))                        \_,-_/  Milky Way.



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 07:35:47 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?

Quote:


>> Get a laptop  and install whatever you need.  Macsyma, Mathematica,
>> .... you get the idea.
> No Macsyma.  It got reabsorbed into Symbolics who then stopped talking
> about distributing it.  It *was* ported to Windows, Linux, Mac, and misc
> Unices, as well as Genera.
> Anyone heard the status of Macsyma lately?  'james

http://www.ma.utexas.edu/maxima.html
Maxima is DOE Macsyma from the early 80s ported to Common Lisp.
Unfortunately the maintainer of Maxima and GCL, Bill Schelter, died
recently.

Tim



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 07:48:29 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?

Quote:
> > Not for a long time, CL forever! :-)  LOL

> (all-praise-common-lisp?) => #t

Cross posted!  

Hey no schemisms ------^ !

Wade



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 09:35:11 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?

Quote:

> I'm trying to brush up on some higher math through
> private reading and am looking to get a graphing
> calculator to help me along.  The only calculators I've
> used so far are "scientific" (ie, +-*/, trig, log, hyp,
> and stats on single-var lists).  I like the promise of
> visualizing complicated functions on the x,y-plane (or
> x,y,z-space), and the ability to do numeric integration
> and matrix manipulation, but I'm not really looking for
> a "student" calculator, with menu'd lessons and such.
> Also, I'd like a machine whose programming language is
> as Scheme-like in feel, if not in syntax.  Is this too
> tall an order?  If not, what brand/model would
> you recommend?  Thanks.

The HP 48GX and HP 49G calculators should be able to do everything you
want and more.  The 49G in particular has a fairly sophisticated
computer algebra system; a 48GX with some additional freely-available
software comes pretty close.  The programming language they use is sort
of an unholy combination of FORTH, Pascal, and LISP (they call it RPL
for "Reverse Polish LISP") but is very practical and flexible.

--
Steve VanDevender  "I ride the big iron"  http://jcomm.uoregon.edu/~stevev

Little things break, circuitry burns / Time flies while my little world turns
Every day comes, every day goes / 100 years and nobody shows -- Happy Rhodes



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 12:04:08 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?

Quote:
>I'm trying to brush up on some higher math through
>private reading and am looking to get a graphing
>calculator to help me along.  

What about Audrey Jaffer's JACAL running on a laptop
or palmtop?

http://swissnet.ai.mit.edu/~jaffer/JACAL.html

Apparently, SLIB supports Pocket Scheme, so I suspect
that JACAL will run on Pocket Scheme on a Windows CE
PDA. But I don't have such a PDA myself; perhaps others
are willing to comment on this?

Hope this helps,

Stephan



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 15:12:26 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?
For advanced mathematics on a small computer or handheld, have a look
at derive (http://www.derive.com).  It is a computer algebra system
which needs only a tiny amount of resources and even runs on dos.  It
is written in mulisp.

The HP calculater range uses RPL, which could be remotely considered
lisp - alike.

Marc

--
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
email: marc dot hoffmann at users dot whh dot wau dot nl
------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 18:17:20 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?

Quote:

> I'm trying to brush up on some higher math through
> private reading and am looking to get a graphing
> calculator to help me along.  The only calculators I've
> used so far are "scientific" (ie, +-*/, trig, log, hyp,
> and stats on single-var lists).  I like the promise of
> visualizing complicated functions on the x,y-plane (or
> x,y,z-space), and the ability to do numeric integration
> and matrix manipulation, but I'm not really looking for
> a "student" calculator, with menu'd lessons and such.
> Also, I'd like a machine whose programming language is
> as Scheme-like in feel, if not in syntax.  Is this too
> tall an order?  If not, what brand/model would
> you recommend?  Thanks.

HP48 has to be the obvious choice, if you want a calculator as such
(rather than something on a palm or so).  It's not Lisp/Scheme as
such, it's more like Forth-with-GC.  Things like Lists are a pain for
a Lisp person because they're not really linked-lists (you can't share
tails).  Against that it's completely programmable, and people have
done serious stuff for it, like non-trivial algebra systems.  You need
to get some of these packages rather than use the built-in stuff,
which is fine, but pales in comparison.  There is an *amazing* amount
of software written for these things. They are slow, and memory is a
lot (and you need some extra).  You want the GX model.

There's some newer one (hp49G) which may be better but I lost track of
things before it really came out.

HP's site is www.hp.com/calculators, the best user site I know is
www.hpcalc.org

--tim



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 17:11:04 GMT  
 Schemely graphing calculators?

Quote:

> > > graphics support. Of course, you'd have to write your own
> > > calculator, but since you seem to like programming scheme, that
> > > shouldn't be a problem ;-).

> > Cough, sputter, .......

> > SEEM to like programming in Scheme!  Aaaagh!  Of all the things to
> > be tagged with in this forum.

> Silly, this is cross-posted to both c.l.scheme and c.l.lisp.  Not
> that those pot-smoking communist hippie Scheme freaks care. ;-)

> > Not for a long time, CL forever! :-)  LOL

> (all-praise-common-lisp?) => #t

Is this function a widely used extension to scheme? Last time I looked
at R5RS it was not there...

--
Janis Dzerins

  If million people say a stupid thing it's still a stupid thing.



Sun, 14 Mar 2004 17:38:18 GMT  
 
 [ 42 post ]  Go to page: [1] [2] [3]

 Relevant Pages 

1. Schemely graphing calculators?

2. Graphing Calculators

3. Graphing Calculators

4. Creating a language... (for a graphing calculator)

5. Looking for graphing calculator code

6. Calculator cgi/Subnet calculator

7. a more Schemely version of that integer square root routine

8. Apologies Looking for Graph GUI like Dr. Graph again

9. XY Graph over Intensity Graph

10. Graphs - I need more graphs ( Simulation development )

11. graphing and graph widgets

12. 2D, 3D graph widgets and graphing utilities..??

 

 
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software