"foo" 
Author Message
 "foo"

To all you C (what ever) programmers... If I ever see "foo" again I'm gonna
puke.

Richard (Ready with the pot){*filter*}inson



Wed, 14 Jul 2004 15:15:05 GMT  
 "foo"

Quote:
> To all you C (what ever) programmers... If I ever see "foo" again I'm
gonna
> puke.

You have a point. In this newsgroup, one should use the COBOL generic
datanames:

WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
01 FILLER.
  05  WS-FOO     PIC 9(04).
  05  WS-BAR     PIC 9(04).
  05  WS-BAZ      PIC 9(04).
 etc...

MCM



Wed, 14 Jul 2004 22:22:15 GMT  
 "foo"

Quote:



>> To all you C (what ever) programmers... If I ever see "foo" again I'm
>gonna
>> puke.

>You have a point. In this newsgroup, one should use the COBOL generic
>datanames:

>WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
>01 FILLER.
>  05  WS-FOO     PIC 9(04).
>  05  WS-BAR     PIC 9(04).
>  05  WS-BAZ      PIC 9(04).
> etc...

... but what if it comes as file-input?

FD  A7102285-CUST-MAST-D600-FILE
    ORGANIZATION      IS  SEQUENTIAL
    ACCESS MODE       IS  SEQUENTIAL
    RECORD CONTAINS  600  CHARACTERS
    BLOCK  CONTAINS    0  RECORDS
    DATA RECORD       IS  A7102285-CUST-MAST-D600-REC.
01  A7102285-CUST-MAST-D600-REC.
    05  A7102285-CUST-MAST-D600-KEY.
        10  A7102285-CUST-MAST-D600-FOO      PIC  X(015).
        10  A7102285-CUST-MAST-D600-FILE-REDEF01
             REDEFINES A7102285-CUST-MAST-D600-FOO.
            15  A7102285-CUST-MAST-D600-BAR  PIC  9(015).
ETC... errrr, etc.

(now, folks, just for a moment... think of the response of a programmer
used to dealing with lower-case source code who is exposed to this kind of
thing; it might help explain why an initial, aesthetic response is 'Ugh!  
Yuck!  {*filter*} ol' archaic, blocky stuff!')

DD



Thu, 15 Jul 2004 00:59:41 GMT  
 "foo"
Is not this from "I want some sea foo mama! ?

Warren

Quote:


> > To all you C (what ever) programmers... If I ever see "foo" again I'm
> gonna
> > puke.

> You have a point. In this newsgroup, one should use the COBOL generic
> datanames:

> WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
> 01 FILLER.
>   05  WS-FOO     PIC 9(04).
>   05  WS-BAR     PIC 9(04).
>   05  WS-BAZ      PIC 9(04).
>  etc...

> MCM



Thu, 15 Jul 2004 02:43:34 GMT  
 "foo"
I have seen a lot of Programming Languages (and teach said course on a
semi-annual basis), but "foo", "bar", etc, still mean nothing to me -
especially when I coach my students to use meaningful variable names.
[:)].

Floyd Johnson


: > To all you C (what ever) programmers... If I ever see "foo" again I'm
: gonna
: > puke.

: You have a point. In this newsgroup, one should use the COBOL generic
: datanames:

: WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
: 01 FILLER.
:   05  WS-FOO     PIC 9(04).
:   05  WS-BAR     PIC 9(04).
:   05  WS-BAZ      PIC 9(04).
:  etc...

: MCM

--
--
+-----------------------------------------------------------+
|                      Floyd H. Johnson                     |
+-----------------------------+-----------------------------+    
| Voice  : (716) 594 - 0942   | 87 Parkway Drive            |

+-----------------------------+-----------------------------+
|                 http://bounce.to/Roberts                  |
+-----------------------------------------------------------+
| If you think you understand Him,                          |
|               then you really do not know HIM !!          |
+-----------------------------------------------------------+



Thu, 15 Jul 2004 03:26:09 GMT  
 "foo"

Quote:

> Is not this from "I want some sea foo mama! ?

Allegedly it comes from one of the University campasses where there was
a 'Food Bar' that had lost the 'd' from its sign.


Thu, 15 Jul 2004 16:30:23 GMT  
 "foo"


Quote:
> I have seen a lot of Programming Languages (and teach said course on a
> semi-annual basis), but "foo", "bar", etc, still mean nothing to me -
> especially when I coach my students to use meaningful variable names.
> [:)].

"foobar" is a sanitized rendition of "FUBAR," a venerable military
expression standing for "{*filter*}ed Up Beyond All Recognition."

As such, "foobar" is entirely appropriate for many data processing
applications.



Thu, 15 Jul 2004 07:34:36 GMT  
 "foo"

Quote:



> > I have seen a lot of Programming Languages (and teach said course on a
> > semi-annual basis), but "foo", "bar", etc, still mean nothing to me -
> > especially when I coach my students to use meaningful variable names.
> > [:)].

> "foobar" is a sanitized rendition of "FUBAR," a venerable military
> expression standing for "{*filter*}ed Up Beyond All Recognition."

> As such, "foobar" is entirely appropriate for many data processing
> applications.

If that's the case, then you could substitute the W.W.II - 'SNAFU',
'Situation Normal and All ........" <G>.

Thane, is Fubar somewhere near WBF, Montana, or should that be Assville,
Ontario <G>



Thu, 15 Jul 2004 07:51:08 GMT  
 "foo"


Quote:

> > Is not this from "I want some sea foo mama! ?

> Allegedly it comes from one of the University campasses where there was
> a 'Food Bar' that had lost the 'd' from its sign.

    I always thought that it came from an old classic SciFi movie that used
the phrase.

    It was an acronym - the g rated version:

Fouled Up Beyond All Repair

    Of course the movie might not have been the first to
use this phrase.



Thu, 15 Jul 2004 11:51:46 GMT  
 "foo"

Quote:
>Subject: Re: "foo"

>Date: 1/26/02 6:51 PM Eastern Standard Time
>Thane, is Fubar somewhere near WBF, Montana, or should that be Assville,
>Ontario <G>

Maybe near {*filter*} PA which is south of Blue Ball and north of Paradise.


Thu, 15 Jul 2004 12:46:06 GMT  
 "foo"



Quote:




> > > I have seen a lot of Programming Languages (and teach said course on a
> > > semi-annual basis), but "foo", "bar", etc, still mean nothing to me -
> > > especially when I coach my students to use meaningful variable names.
> > > [:)].

> > "foobar" is a sanitized rendition of "FUBAR," a venerable military
> > expression standing for "{*filter*}ed Up Beyond All Recognition."

> > As such, "foobar" is entirely appropriate for many data processing
> > applications.

> If that's the case, then you could substitute the W.W.II - 'SNAFU',
> 'Situation Normal and All ........" <G>.

It's my understanding that FUBAR is the aggravated case of SNAFU. Beyond
that, in intensity, I'm advised is "CLUSTER F'KED" (no acronym available).
The penultimate is "DAISY F'KED" (again, no acronym, sorry) named after the
results of the "Daisy Cutter" bombs.

Aside: The "Daisy Cutter" bomb is a VERY LARGE container of mostly fuel that
(sort of) explodes into a large fog about 100 meters above the ground. After
dispersal, this fuel vapor is ignited - no, detonated - and everything below
the exploding mist ceases to exist. This cloud of devastation concusses the
target up to 600 meters in diameter. Originally designed to clear mine
fields, the "Daisy Cutter" has been found to turn jungles into circles of
desert and, in the case of Afghanistan for example, to turn desert into
proto-desert, a sort-of primordial fused sand littered with very hard things
(the tempered steel of some weapons). The bomb derives it's name from the
imprint of the destruction, roughly resembling a cookie-cutter imprint of a
cute little flower.

The ultimate disaster, would be something along the lines of "NUCLEAR
F'KED," though I've never seen that applied to a computer condition, at
least no application in which I've been involved. Yet.



Fri, 16 Jul 2004 02:33:44 GMT  
 "foo"


Quote:






> > > > I have seen a lot of Programming Languages (and teach said course on
a
> > > > semi-annual basis), but "foo", "bar", etc, still mean nothing to
me -
> > > > especially when I coach my students to use meaningful variable
names.
> > > > [:)].

> > > "foobar" is a sanitized rendition of "FUBAR," a venerable military
> > > expression standing for "{*filter*}ed Up Beyond All Recognition."

> > > As such, "foobar" is entirely appropriate for many data processing
> > > applications.

> > If that's the case, then you could substitute the W.W.II - 'SNAFU',
> > 'Situation Normal and All ........" <G>.

> It's my understanding that FUBAR is the aggravated case of SNAFU. Beyond
> that, in intensity, I'm advised is "CLUSTER F'KED" (no acronym available).
> The penultimate is "DAISY F'KED" (again, no acronym, sorry) named after
the
> results of the "Daisy Cutter" bombs.

> Aside: The "Daisy Cutter" bomb is a VERY LARGE container of mostly fuel
that
> (sort of) explodes into a large fog about 100 meters above the ground.
After
> dispersal, this fuel vapor is ignited - no, detonated - and everything
below
> the exploding mist ceases to exist. This cloud of devastation concusses
the
> target up to 600 meters in diameter. Originally designed to clear mine
> fields, the "Daisy Cutter" has been found to turn jungles into circles of
> desert and, in the case of Afghanistan for example, to turn desert into
> proto-desert, a sort-of primordial fused sand littered with very hard
things
> (the tempered steel of some weapons). The bomb derives it's name from the
> imprint of the destruction, roughly resembling a cookie-cutter imprint of
a
> cute little flower.

> The ultimate disaster, would be something along the lines of "NUCLEAR
> F'KED," though I've never seen that applied to a computer condition, at
> least no application in which I've been involved. Yet.

Bowing, of course, to your superior knowledge, but I thought a "Mongolian
Cluster F*ck" was a totally scripted, news free press conference, as
perfected by the US military in the 60s?

I have also always been fond of FUBB ("Beyond Belief").



Fri, 16 Jul 2004 03:18:03 GMT  
 "foo"


Quote:








> > > > > I have seen a lot of Programming Languages (and teach said course
on
> a
> > > > > semi-annual basis), but "foo", "bar", etc, still mean nothing to
> me -
> > > > > especially when I coach my students to use meaningful variable
> names.
> > > > > [:)].

> > > > "foobar" is a sanitized rendition of "FUBAR," a venerable military
> > > > expression standing for "{*filter*}ed Up Beyond All Recognition."

> > > > As such, "foobar" is entirely appropriate for many data processing
> > > > applications.

> > > If that's the case, then you could substitute the W.W.II - 'SNAFU',
> > > 'Situation Normal and All ........" <G>.

> > It's my understanding that FUBAR is the aggravated case of SNAFU. Beyond
> > that, in intensity, I'm advised is "CLUSTER F'KED" (no acronym
available).
> > The penultimate is "DAISY F'KED" (again, no acronym, sorry) named after
> the
> > results of the "Daisy Cutter" bombs.

> > Aside: The "Daisy Cutter" bomb is a VERY LARGE container of mostly fuel
> that
> > (sort of) explodes into a large fog about 100 meters above the ground.
> After
> > dispersal, this fuel vapor is ignited - no, detonated - and everything
> below
> > the exploding mist ceases to exist. This cloud of devastation concusses
> the
> > target up to 600 meters in diameter. Originally designed to clear mine
> > fields, the "Daisy Cutter" has been found to turn jungles into circles
of
> > desert and, in the case of Afghanistan for example, to turn desert into
> > proto-desert, a sort-of primordial fused sand littered with very hard
> things
> > (the tempered steel of some weapons). The bomb derives it's name from
the
> > imprint of the destruction, roughly resembling a cookie-cutter imprint
of
> a
> > cute little flower.

> > The ultimate disaster, would be something along the lines of "NUCLEAR
> > F'KED," though I've never seen that applied to a computer condition, at
> > least no application in which I've been involved. Yet.

> Bowing, of course, to your superior knowledge, but I thought a "Mongolian
> Cluster F*ck" was a totally scripted, news free press conference, as
> perfected by the US military in the 60s?

> I have also always been fond of FUBB ("Beyond Belief").

Cluster F*uck ia a pool room term that goes back to at least 1900.  It
referes to a cluster of balls that destroy your chances of runnng out.

Donald



Fri, 16 Jul 2004 05:14:59 GMT  
 "foo"
    I heard a 2cd hand story about a problem that may have
warranted the "Cluster F'ked" bit.  As best as I can remember
this happened at a very large group of Mainframes at Prince of
Something or other in Pennsylvania, possibly with Boeing.

    The story was that they were formatting a new disk pack,
when the format utility went haywire, possibly due to
another program that wrote outside of it's memory space.

    I thought that mainframes would not let you do that, but this
was a long time ago.  Instead of formatting all cylinders on that one
disk pack, it formatted cylinder zero on all disk packs.

    This crashed many mainframes, since they were apparently
connected in some sort of early network.

    Do you suppose that anyone with a large site in the World Trade
Center, and without a good disaster policy might qualify for Nuclear.
Especially if they were near the top of the building.


Quote:






> > > > I have seen a lot of Programming Languages (and teach said course on
a
> > > > semi-annual basis), but "foo", "bar", etc, still mean nothing to
me -
> > > > especially when I coach my students to use meaningful variable
names.
> > > > [:)].

> > > "foobar" is a sanitized rendition of "FUBAR," a venerable military
> > > expression standing for "{*filter*}ed Up Beyond All Recognition."

> > > As such, "foobar" is entirely appropriate for many data processing
> > > applications.

> > If that's the case, then you could substitute the W.W.II - 'SNAFU',
> > 'Situation Normal and All ........" <G>.

> It's my understanding that FUBAR is the aggravated case of SNAFU. Beyond
> that, in intensity, I'm advised is "CLUSTER F'KED" (no acronym available).
> The penultimate is "DAISY F'KED" (again, no acronym, sorry) named after
the
> results of the "Daisy Cutter" bombs.

> Aside: The "Daisy Cutter" bomb is a VERY LARGE container of mostly fuel
that
> (sort of) explodes into a large fog about 100 meters above the ground.
After
> dispersal, this fuel vapor is ignited - no, detonated - and everything
below
> the exploding mist ceases to exist. This cloud of devastation concusses
the
> target up to 600 meters in diameter. Originally designed to clear mine
> fields, the "Daisy Cutter" has been found to turn jungles into circles of
> desert and, in the case of Afghanistan for example, to turn desert into
> proto-desert, a sort-of primordial fused sand littered with very hard
things
> (the tempered steel of some weapons). The bomb derives it's name from the
> imprint of the destruction, roughly resembling a cookie-cutter imprint of
a
> cute little flower.

> The ultimate disaster, would be something along the lines of "NUCLEAR
> F'KED," though I've never seen that applied to a computer condition, at
> least no application in which I've been involved. Yet.



Fri, 16 Jul 2004 13:17:21 GMT  
 "foo"

Quote:

> >Subject: Re: "foo"

> >Date: 1/26/02 6:51 PM Eastern Standard Time

> >Thane, is Fubar somewhere near WBF, Montana, or should that be Assville,
> >Ontario <G>

> Maybe near {*filter*} PA which is south of Blue Ball and north of Paradise.

Good on yer, Eileen. Right on !. Hey Don. She's better at it than than you are,
with your Assville, Ontario <G>

Jimmy



Fri, 16 Jul 2004 04:04:20 GMT  
 
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