Not C program question, historical question 
Author Message
 Not C program question, historical question

I've been reading a thread in the Sun group about decompilers and such.
A point was made about how the K&R book was not considered to be an
authorative source for C anymore.  

My question is this:

At what point did Kernighan and Ritchie fall out of the C community and
stop contributing to C standards and the direction that the language
takes - if they've stopped doing that at all?  I'm not much of a groupie
on programming language authors so for all I can tell they could be both
dead - no disrespect if they are.

My perspective is that since they're the authors of the language I would
expect them to be involved in its evolution - if only on the periphery.
--
All these opinions are mine,
and are not necessarily shared
by The Boeing Company.



Sat, 26 Feb 2005 22:01:28 GMT  
 Not C program question, historical question

Quote:
> I've been reading a thread in the Sun group about decompilers and such.
> A point was made about how the K&R book was not considered to be an
> authorative source for C anymore.  

Well, the book certainly is not the authorative resource it was
back in the time when the language was defined by their book.
Today we have an international standard that is meant to be the
requested resource. OTOH the book still is a resource for C
programmers (newbies and pros). Many aspects are explained in a
way easier to understand than the standard does and the standard
does not cope with programming itself but only the language.

Quote:
> My question is this:

> At what point did Kernighan and Ritchie fall out of the C community and
> stop contributing to C standards and the direction that the language
> takes - if they've stopped doing that at all?  I'm not much of a groupie
> on programming language authors so for all I can tell they could be both
> dead - no disrespect if they are.

They are both still there and AFAIK dmr is member of the working
group defining the standard. I'm not sure whether bwk has been a
member of the comitee at some time but he published different
books over the past decade or so, and it appears that he is still
an authority in the community.

I suspect that the comment on K&R2 is meant to tell you that the
book does not define the language and you should not use the book
as the standard.

--

"LISP  is worth learning for  the profound enlightenment  experience
you will have when you finally get it; that experience will make you
a better programmer for the rest of your days."   -- Eric S. Raymond



Sat, 26 Feb 2005 22:33:43 GMT  
 Not C program question, historical question
They're very much there :) , in fact Dennis ritchie and a team from
bell-labs have come out with a new OS called plan9 , check it out ,
supposed to be very neatly written.

FYI
Vinay

Quote:

> I've been reading a thread in the Sun group about decompilers and such.
> A point was made about how the K&R book was not considered to be an
> authorative source for C anymore.

> My question is this:

> At what point did Kernighan and Ritchie fall out of the C community and
> stop contributing to C standards and the direction that the language
> takes - if they've stopped doing that at all?  I'm not much of a groupie
> on programming language authors so for all I can tell they could be both
> dead - no disrespect if they are.

> My perspective is that since they're the authors of the language I would
> expect them to be involved in its evolution - if only on the periphery.
> --
> All these opinions are mine,
> and are not necessarily shared
> by The Boeing Company.

--

Vinay Wagh                        
Cisco Systems (India) Private Ltd.



Sun, 27 Feb 2005 00:28:38 GMT  
 Not C program question, historical question

Quote:
> I've been reading a thread in the Sun group about decompilers and such.
> A point was made about how the K&R book was not considered to be an
> authorative source for C anymore.

It's less authoritative than the ANSI C Standard.  Before the standard was
ratified, their book was *the* authority on how C ought to work.  Obviously,
a formal standard is much better.

Quote:
> My question is this:

> At what point did Kernighan and Ritchie fall out of the C community and
> stop contributing to C standards and the direction that the language
> takes - if they've stopped doing that at all?

Not sure about Kernighan, but Ritchie is an active member of the ANSI C
standards committee.

Quote:
> I'm not much of a groupie
> on programming language authors so for all I can tell they could be both
> dead - no disrespect if they are.

> My perspective is that since they're the authors of the language I would
> expect them to be involved in its evolution - if only on the periphery.

You guessed right.
--
C-FAQ: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html
 "The C-FAQ Book" ISBN 0-201-84519-9
C.A.P. FAQ: ftp://cap.connx.com/pub/Chess%20Analysis%20Project%20FAQ.htm


Sun, 27 Feb 2005 00:57:52 GMT  
 Not C program question, historical question

Quote:

> They're very much there :) , in fact Dennis ritchie and a team from
> bell-labs have come out with a new OS called plan9 , check it out ,
> supposed to be very neatly written.

http://www.badmovies.org/movies/plannine/plannine4.wav

--
 pete



Sun, 27 Feb 2005 14:49:20 GMT  
 
 [ 5 post ] 

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