Basic arithmetic type conversion rule 
Author Message
 Basic arithmetic type conversion rule

Dear Sires:

   I post the mail in borland forum and get following result about bit
conversion. I'm not sure I did get the correct answer, thus I re-post it
into the board. Can someone help me to identify the result.

Quote:

> Dear sir:

>     I know the final result will be located between 0x00 to 0xFF (-127 to
> 128) if the variable is char type.

>    But I don't know the rule how they made the result from -257 to any
> number between (-127 to 128)". By bitwise conversion or something else.

>   For example:

>    long  int i = -32768;        // long int means four byte precision.
>    short int j = i;                  // short int means two byte
precision.
>    short int k=-32768;

>    Then what's the value of j and k after these expression ?
>     For j, the value is passed from a high precision variable i.
>     For k, the value is passed from a higher prevision constant value.
>     Is there any difference ? And what's the general rules ?.


> > >    Can somebody tell me the rules how C made type conversion from wide
> > > precision type
> > > to low precision type.

> > >    For example:

> > >     char a=-257;   // "a" equal to "minus two hundred and fifty
seven".

> > The size of char types in BCB is one byte.  This means it can only hold
> > values in the range [-128,127] if signed, or [0,255] if unsigned.

> > >     The result will be "a" equal to "0x01". But how it made the
result?
> > > What's the rule ?

> > I would have expected it to become -1 if signed (0xff).  I thought that
> > the bits 0--7 were retained and bits 8 and over were discarded.
> > However, if you really get +1 from -257, that must be wrong.
> > > >You are correct Mr. Radar User, bits 0-7 are kept.  Remember, -257 is
> > > >actually needs 10 bits to represent it.  I'm not too sure what the
> > > >"rules" are, but typically, what will happen is that the MSB (most
> > > >significant bits) are discarded.
> > > >In the -257 example:
> > > >-257 = 100000001 <- 9 bits, if we consider the sign, it would be
> > > >1100000001
> > > >Since char is only 8 bits, this number gets stored as:  0x00000001
which
> > > >is +1!
> > > >So, if long is 4 bytes:
> > > >i = -32768 = 10000000 00000000 10000000 00000000
> > > >Now, drop this into a short (2 bytes):
> > > >j = 10000000 00000000
> > > >or
> > > >k = 10000000 00000000
> > > >The value for j and k would be "-0" or 0.  There are no real "rules"
> > > >that I know of; the convention has been to save the LSB's and discard
> > > >the rest.
> > > >Viggy



Fri, 23 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 1 post ] 

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