intermediate -> advanced C exercises or books 
Author Message
 intermediate -> advanced C exercises or books


hours work a week required).  My instructor describes my skills as
intermediate, and I don't want to stop here.  In this expert group's
opinion, what's my next step?  I know that coding is like any other
foreign language, if you don't use it, you lose it.  So what kind of
projects, found in what type of source, would help me refine my skills
independently?  Also, is it too soon to add another language to my
toolkit? (I was thinking about Perl, since it resembles C..)

My inclination at the moment is to start working my way through the
exercises in K&R2.  Comments?

TIA.
J. Harper



Sat, 10 Oct 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 intermediate -> advanced C exercises or books

Quote:


>hours work a week required).  My instructor describes my skills as

......
Congrats upon successfully completing your course!
Why not write a few programs-> the ultimate way to
relate what you have learned!
I am also "in your shoes".

I try and balance "textbook style learning" with actual
programming at about a 30/70 split.
Why not write some apps and upload them to an FTP site
such as GARBO or something.
The task-oriented  discipline that writing real programs
requires is excellent for pushing your knowledge and skill
with your coding.

Good luck
..phil



Sun, 11 Oct 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 intermediate -> advanced C exercises or books



Quote:

> hours work a week required).  My instructor describes my skills as
> intermediate, and I don't want to stop here.  In this expert group's
> opinion, what's my next step?  I know that coding is like any other
> foreign language, if you don't use it, you lose it.  So what kind of
> projects, found in what type of source, would help me refine my skills

The best (maybe the only) way to learn a language (or just programming in
general) is to write lots of real life programs!  Simply find a problem for
which you would like a programmed solution (the more interested you are in
the problem, or the solution, you are the better) and implement it.

This method only really works properly if writing the program is a real
challenge.  Toy problems with toy answers are reasonably meaningless.  A good
project would be one for which you have little idea how to implement the
deatils for, but with planning and reading you find the solution.

You will great experience and satisfaction with the finished project, even
though the chances are that it is sloppily coded, slow, ugly and hard to
extend.  That doesn't matter -- these parts are artforms and only develop
with practice.  That is when you will become an advanced programmer.

I found this technique invaluable when I first moved from BASIC (Eugh!) to
Pascal.  The program I wrote is actually on an ftp site somewhere.  It is
probably the worst code I've seen, but using this technique learnt Pascal
programming techniques (pointers!) in a couple of weeks.  Over a month or so
I developed much more structured and reusable programs.  Similarly, when
spurred by a need to program under Linux I learnt C, I read a cheap intro to
C book to see if it was for me and wrote a few tiny programs to test my own
hypotheses.  I then moved on to a large project involving lots of useful
things I didn't understand at the time (files...) etc.  At this point I
bought my K&R and decided to learn the intricacies... <gulp>

Quote:
> independently?  Also, is it too soon to add another language to my
> toolkit? (I was thinking about Perl, since it resembles C..)

You can never know too many languages.  As long as you feel secure in your
C knowledge, then you won't lose any (much?!) of it when you learn Perl.
Maybe something *without* a C like syntax would be better if you are not, as
you are less likely to confuse the languages!  (happens to the best of us, as
well as myself.. ;)

Quote:
> My inclination at the moment is to start working my way through the
> exercises in K&R2.  Comments?

Maybe some of the more involved ones -- if you can easily write the program
to solve the exercise, then the exercise was not worth doing.

.splitbung
--
* TQ 1.0 * The 'Just So Quotes'.
C Code.  C Code Run.  Run, Code, RUN! PLEASE!!!!



Mon, 12 Oct 1998 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 3 post ] 

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