GNU Assembler? 
Author Message
 GNU Assembler?

Hello

I am trying to learn GNU Assembler under Linux on an i386 machine.  
Could anyone point me towards usefull ressources/ documentation on the web.
While there are a lot of assembly tutorials out there almost all of them deal
with TASM , MASM or NASM.
The GNU Assembler uses AT&T syntax and has directives that are probably not
found elsewhere.  The GNU manual for it is a little bit over my head.

So far the only usefull stuff I found on it, was from the DJGPP
delorie website.

I'd be grateful if someone could point me towards something
even another newsgroup.

Thanks

--
Chris Kolmaga



Sat, 16 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 GNU Assembler?


Quote:
> Hello

> I am trying to learn GNU Assembler under Linux on an i386 machine.  
> Could anyone point me towards usefull ressources/ documentation on the web.
> While there are a lot of assembly tutorials out there almost all of them deal
> with TASM , MASM or NASM.

Allow me to be the first (probably of many) who advise against this.  
gas has a number of serious problems. gcc and such don't produce the
sorts of code that'll make the problems apparent, but hand-written
code can and more or less inevitably will, usually fairly quickly.  
Learning assembly language is hard enough without adding in an
assembler that may add to your difficulties.

If you want to learn assembly language under Linux, I'd strongly
recommend using NASM instead.  As you've already noted, there's more
documentation on it, and while bugs still crop up now and then,
they're typically dealt with quite quickly and efficiently.

--
    Later,
    Jerry.

The Universe is a figment of its own imagination.



Sat, 16 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 GNU Assembler?

Quote:

> I am trying to learn GNU Assembler under Linux on an i386 machine.
. . .
> tutorials out there almost all of them deal with TASM , MASM or NASM.
. . .
> So far the only usefull stuff I found on it, was from the DJGPP
> delorie website.

  My guess is that is the best you will find.  GNU stuff isn't
real strong on documentation to begin with, and it is especially
weak on documenting x86 specific features.  It is very hard to
understand an assembler if the CPU specific parts are ommitted.

  There is little, if any, difference between GNU assembler
under x86 Linux and GNU assembler in DJGPP.  The DJGPP
website and newsgroup seem more helpful to x86 asm
questions.

BTW, I hope you know that NASM works under Linux.  That gives
you a choice if GNU Assembler is too hard to learn.
--
http://www.erols.com/johnfine/
http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Peaks/8600/



Sat, 16 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 GNU Assembler?

Quote:

> Hello

> I am trying to learn GNU Assembler under Linux on an i386 machine.
> Could anyone point me towards usefull ressources/ documentation on the web.
> While there are a lot of assembly tutorials out there almost all of them deal
> with TASM , MASM or NASM.
> The GNU Assembler uses AT&T syntax and has directives that are probably not
> found elsewhere.  The GNU manual for it is a little bit over my head.

> So far the only usefull stuff I found on it, was from the DJGPP
> delorie website.

> I'd be grateful if someone could point me towards something
> even another newsgroup.

There is some help on syntax in one of the assembly language journal
issues, you can get them from asmjournal.freeservers.com

There will probably be more to follow - but what's there now was good
enough to get me started with almost no asm experience.

Also, you can use gcc to compile your assembly and this preprocesses
files using cpp if it is named with the .S extension rather than .s

--
Tristan Wibberley



Mon, 18 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 GNU Assembler?

Quote:

>Allow me to be the first (probably of many) who advise against this.  
>gas has a number of serious problems. gcc and such don't produce the
>sorts of code that'll make the problems apparent, but hand-written
>code can and more or less inevitably will, usually fairly quickly.  

Let me be the first, and probably the only one, to disagree. GCC+inline
assembly is a very powerful tool.  By using GAS, you'll avoid the mostly
useless 16-bit code that still hangs on in some corners.  And, of course,
the endless DOSisms. GCC+inline allows you to intersperse assembly with a C
framework and optimize the parts where it makes a difference.  And if you're
running under a UNIX system, using GCC+inline asm will avoid the multiple
bugs the NASM still has.  And, of course, the annoyance of the 2 pass
maximum on macro expansion.  And, don't forget, the extended assembly syntax
(meaning the syntax of the C-asm interface, not the assembly code itself)
is applicable to every other processor GCC has been ported to.

My earlier message giving the URL of Brennans Guide to Inline Assembly
never made it through.  Sleeping moderator?  The URL is
http://sag-www.ssl.berkeley.edu/~korpela/djgpp_asm.html

Eric

--
Eric Korpela                        |  An object at rest can never be

<a href="http://sag-www.ssl.berkeley.edu/~korpela">Click for home page.</a>



Mon, 18 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 GNU Assembler?
You could have a look at this..
A very nice *gentle* introduction into the world of DJGPP assembler, same
thing as GCC though..

It's what I used to move from TASM syntax to AT&T syntax, and once you get
over the mind*&$#$*(, you may find you prefer this..

Anyway, try:
http://www.delorie.com/djgpp/doc/brennan/brennan_att_inline_djgpp.html


Quote:


> > Hello

> > I am trying to learn GNU Assembler under Linux on an i386 machine.
> > Could anyone point me towards usefull ressources/ documentation on the
web.
> > While there are a lot of assembly tutorials out there almost all of them
deal
> > with TASM , MASM or NASM.

> Allow me to be the first (probably of many) who advise against this.
> gas has a number of serious problems. gcc and such don't produce the
> sorts of code that'll make the problems apparent, but hand-written
> code can and more or less inevitably will, usually fairly quickly.
> Learning assembly language is hard enough without adding in an
> assembler that may add to your difficulties.

> If you want to learn assembly language under Linux, I'd strongly
> recommend using NASM instead.  As you've already noted, there's more
> documentation on it, and while bugs still crop up now and then,
> they're typically dealt with quite quickly and efficiently.

> --
>     Later,
>     Jerry.

> The Universe is a figment of its own imagination.



Mon, 18 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 6 post ] 

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