Learning 
Author Message
 Learning

Hi, I just found this newsgroup and I was wondering if there is any good
websites that will teach me how to program in assembly and get the
program that assembles it? I have never programed for computers so would
ASM be ok for me to learn?


Thu, 01 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Learning
Delphi would be a lot more fun to start with than assembly.
Randy Hyde


Quote:
> Hi, I just found this newsgroup and I was wondering if there is any good
> websites that will teach me how to program in assembly and get the
> program that assembles it? I have never programed for computers so would
> ASM be ok for me to learn?



Fri, 02 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Learning
You have a good point there.  Still, C/C++ has a much too cryptic syntax for
complete beginners.  Of course you'll get hooked on the development environment,
but at least the syntax is something that is a feasable for a beginner to learn.

As far as getting hooked onto IDE's, I have a funny story to tell.  I got so
used to the IDE environment that I didn't know how to use command line tools.  I
downloaded the JDK.  I kept on running the compiler, wondering why only an
MS-DOS window showed up.  It took me a WHILE to find out that I needed to feed
parameters to the darned thing in an MS-DOS box!

If you hate DOS asm, learn Win32 asm.  The way Win32 works makes asm a snap!

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Team2000 PC/Palm Pilot Programming Team:
http://ppilot.homepage.com

Quote:

> I learned VB3 first, and yeah you can start putting some pretty
> sophisticated windoze progs together a couple days out of the box. But THEN
> what? I wish I had tried C first. Or C++ which was out at that time.

> Worst part about VB is you get hooked on the VB development environment,
> which nursemaids you along and keeps you from seeing very much of the nuts
> and bolts of your program. Also more recent versions use a monstrously huge
> runtime library. So much that you can write a prog with just 20 or 30 kb of
> source code and STILL can't get the entire product including setup program
> onto a 1.44 floppy. Start with C or C++, in some other flavor than Visual
> C++ so you get used to seeing all the code. Then when you are ready to write
> really sophisticated progs, use the visual IDE. Don't let it use you.

> Even when you know C++, you may still want to get into VB for single user
> custom database apps, because it is so fast to put a prog together.

> I agree with the other posters, though, that ASM prolly ought to wait until
> you are familiar with at least one high level language be it VB, VC++,
> Smalltalk, whatever.

> My personal interest in ASM (I'm an utter newbie) is writing fast-running
> encryption stuff for use in VB or C++ progs. VB especially is woefully
> inadequate.... slow... when using simple XOR algorithms. Would I want to
> write a complex prog in Assembly? Hell no. Not even if I could. A simple
> file handling prog, a simple tool for C++ prog writing, or a subroutine that
> needs to be right down there in the grass, certainly ASM in whatever flavor
> is worth considerig.

> _____________
> Robinson

> Visit the RedNeck and Tech Resource Center... over 13,000 served!
> http://www.geocities.com/bourbonstreet/square/3844
> or my politically correct site: http://crusoe.org
> _____________


> >Hi, I just found this newsgroup and I was wondering if there is any good
> >websites that will teach me how to program in assembly and get the
> >program that assembles it? I have never programed for computers so would
> >ASM be ok for me to learn?



Fri, 09 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Learning
I learned VB3 first, and yeah you can start putting some pretty
sophisticated windoze progs together a couple days out of the box. But THEN
what? I wish I had tried C first. Or C++ which was out at that time.

Worst part about VB is you get hooked on the VB development environment,
which nursemaids you along and keeps you from seeing very much of the nuts
and bolts of your program. Also more recent versions use a monstrously huge
runtime library. So much that you can write a prog with just 20 or 30 kb of
source code and STILL can't get the entire product including setup program
onto a 1.44 floppy. Start with C or C++, in some other flavor than Visual
C++ so you get used to seeing all the code. Then when you are ready to write
really sophisticated progs, use the visual IDE. Don't let it use you.

Even when you know C++, you may still want to get into VB for single user
custom database apps, because it is so fast to put a prog together.

I agree with the other posters, though, that ASM prolly ought to wait until
you are familiar with at least one high level language be it VB, VC++,
SmallTalk, whatever.

My personal interest in ASM (I'm an utter newbie) is writing fast-running
encryption stuff for use in VB or C++ progs. VB especially is woefully
inadequate.... slow... when using simple XOR algorithms. Would I want to
write a complex prog in Assembly? Hell no. Not even if I could. A simple
file handling prog, a simple tool for C++ prog writing, or a subroutine that
needs to be right down there in the grass, certainly ASM in whatever flavor
is worth considerig.

_____________
Robinson

Visit the RedNeck and Tech Resource Center... over 13,000 served!
http://www.geocities.com/bourbonstreet/square/3844
or my politically correct site: http://crusoe.org
_____________

Quote:

>Hi, I just found this newsgroup and I was wondering if there is any good
>websites that will teach me how to program in assembly and get the
>program that assembles it? I have never programed for computers so would
>ASM be ok for me to learn?



Sat, 10 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Learning
Thanks for your comments on HLA, Al. sounds really interesting. I guess the
reason it took so long for somebody to tackle this was most of the asm crowd
is used to grabbing the machine by the short hairs, so to speak, and write
their own tools and shortcuts that comprise the behind-the-scenes parts of
an IDE. HLA sounds like something I would want to try after I get the basics
of plain vanilla asm down pat.

When I started trying to learn C++ after getting pretty good with VB 3.0, I
was sorely disappointed. I wanted to get right in there and drag-n-drop
together a user interface, write 50 lines of easy to follow code that
resembles plain english, and compile a 12 hour start to finish kick-ass
prog. Boy did I get a harsh taste of reality! Even the "dummies" books
couldn't change the mindset that VB gave me. I am slowly starting to turn
the corner, but it would have been easier for me, I think, had I never
learned VB first.

VB wouldn't be so bad if compiling an exe incorporated just the called
functions of the runtime modules into the executable or into an abbreviated
dll. I hate that damn vbrun600.dll and all its bloated cousins. When
practical, I now use VB for DOS because I can write a small program into a
fairly small stand-alone exe file.

OOPS sorry to drag this so far off topic. For a newbie who against all the
excellent advice given in this thread so far, insists on jumping right into
asm and skipping the high level stuff, I would not hesitate to recommend a
book I am about halfway through by Jeff Duntemann called Assembly Language
Step By Step. Got my copy from Amazon. Lots of stuff there that a computer
science major learns his first semester, but that somebody like me, a high
school dropout, is unfamiliar with, like addresses, registers, etc. I think
I see light at the end of the tunnel.

_____________
Robinson

Visit the RedNeck and Tech Resource Center... over 13,000 served!
http://www.geocities.com/bourbonstreet/square/3844
or my politically correct site: http://crusoe.org
_____________


Quote:
>You have a good point there.  Still, C/C++ has a much too cryptic syntax
for
>complete beginners.  Of course you'll get hooked on the development
environment,
>but at least the syntax is something that is a feasable for a beginner to
learn.

>As far as getting hooked onto IDE's, I have a funny story to tell.  I got
so
>used to the IDE environment that I didn't know how to use command line
tools.  I
>downloaded the JDK.  I kept on running the compiler, wondering why only an
>MS-DOS window showed up.  It took me a WHILE to find out that I needed to
feed
>parameters to the darned thing in an MS-DOS box!

>If you hate DOS asm, learn Win32 asm.  The way Win32 works makes asm a
snap!

>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>Team2000 PC/Palm Pilot Programming Team:
>http://ppilot.homepage.com



Tue, 13 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 8 post ] 

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