Windows 95/98/NT assembler programming 
Author Message
 Windows 95/98/NT assembler programming

Hello all.  I'm looking for good books/online
tutorials/whatever to get me started on this subject.  I've
programmed an 8086 under DOS before, but have no experience
of Windows programming or the extended 386+ instruction set
or modes (weird scary stuff).

All my searches so far point to just one book, by Barry
Kauler, which seems to have mixed reviews (on the lines of
"it's ok, not great but there's no alternative anyway"!).

For a while now I've wanted to learn this but put it off,
but finally I'm so sick and tired of huge, slow applications
that I want to write my own, and write them well in the only
REAL programming language  -  and show those who say stuff
like "a modern optimising C compiler produces code just as
good...", or "it's impossible to write large programs in
assembler" that they are wrong, or die trying.

Anybody got any tips?

cheers,
Dan
--
http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~d71tbg



Thu, 08 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Windows 95/98/NT assembler programming

have first a look at Iczelion Win32 page at

http://pluto.beseen.com/

betov.


Quote:
> Hello all.  I'm looking for good books/online
> tutorials/whatever to get me started on this subject.  I've
> programmed an 8086 under DOS before, but have no experience
> of Windows programming or the extended 386+ instruction set
> or modes (weird scary stuff).

> All my searches so far point to just one book, by Barry
> Kauler, which seems to have mixed reviews (on the lines of
> "it's ok, not great but there's no alternative anyway"!).

> For a while now I've wanted to learn this but put it off,
> but finally I'm so sick and tired of huge, slow applications
> that I want to write my own, and write them well in the only
> REAL programming language  -  and show those who say stuff
> like "a modern optimising C compiler produces code just as
> good...", or "it's impossible to write large programs in
> assembler" that they are wrong, or die trying.

> Anybody got any tips?

> cheers,
> Dan
> --
> http://www.dur.ac.uk/~d71tbg



Sat, 10 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Windows 95/98/NT assembler programming

Quote:

>Hello all.  I'm looking for good books/online
>tutorials/whatever to get me started on this subject.  I've
>programmed an 8086 under DOS before, but have no experience
>of Windows programming or the extended 386+ instruction set
>or modes (weird scary stuff).

>All my searches so far point to just one book, by Barry
>Kauler, which seems to have mixed reviews (on the lines of
>"it's ok, not great but there's no alternative anyway"!).

>For a while now I've wanted to learn this but put it off,
>but finally I'm so sick and tired of huge, slow applications
>that I want to write my own, and write them well in the only
>REAL programming language  -  and show those who say stuff
>like "a modern optimising C compiler produces code just as
>good...", or "it's impossible to write large programs in
>assembler" that they are wrong, or die trying.

I have done some win32 asm programming using:
"Programming windows 95" from Charles Petzold.
The book is 100% C, but it does an excellent job
at explaining programming for windows, and that
is what you need. The rules for translating C
to asm are actually very simple. You don't need
a book for that.

a few links:
http://members.xoom.com/Iczel/
http://personal5.iddeo.es/ret007ow/index.html
http://www.pbq.com.au/home/hutch/masm.htm

Frans Morsch.



Sat, 10 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Windows 95/98/NT assembler programming

Quote:

>Hello all.  I'm looking for good books/online
>tutorials/whatever to get me started on this subject.  I've
>programmed an 8086 under DOS before, but have no experience
>of Windows programming or the extended 386+ instruction set
>or modes (weird scary stuff).

>All my searches so far point to just one book, by Barry
>Kauler, which seems to have mixed reviews (on the lines of
>"it's ok, not great but there's no alternative anyway"!).

>For a while now I've wanted to learn this but put it off,
>but finally I'm so sick and tired of huge, slow applications
>that I want to write my own, and write them well in the only
>REAL programming language  -  and show those who say stuff
>like "a modern optimising C compiler produces code just as
>good...", or "it's impossible to write large programs in
>assembler" that they are wrong, or die trying.

>Anybody got any tips?

See:

http://www.phoenix.gb.net

contains a full pack for writing Win32 apps in NASM. Supports HLL
macros (if/else, while, repeat, procedures, local variables, etc).

Or see:

http://iczelion.cjb.net

(I _think_, can't remember if it's right or not at the 'mo. If it
doesn't work do a web search for 'Iczelion') for writing Win32 apps in
MASM.



Sat, 10 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Windows 95/98/NT assembler programming


Quote:
> Hello all.  I'm looking for good books/online
> tutorials/whatever to get me started on this subject.  I've
> programmed an 8086 under DOS before, but have no experience
> of Windows programming or the extended 386+ instruction set
> or modes (weird scary stuff).
<snip>
> Anybody got any tips?

Dear Dan,

I think the best way to learn about protected-mode programming is reading a
good book on the subject. Some titles:

"The Personal Computer from the Inside Out" by: Murray Sargent II & Richard
L. Shoemaker.
Addison-Wesley Publishing Company

"Assembly Language Master Class" by: various authors
Wrox Press Ltd.

"The Indispensable PC Hardware Book" by: Hans-Peter Messmer
Addison-Wesley Publishing Company

The last book is more about hardware, not programming, but it gives you some
inside on the various machines.
Allthough protected-mode programming might puzzle you at the start (the
Descriptors, Priveledge Levels, Exeptions, Port protection, Paging.. and so
on..) , reading a book on the subject (maybe more then one time) will give
you a good understanding of a world thats (more) clear in it's conventions
after all.

greetings,
Warden Dave



Sat, 10 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Windows 95/98/NT assembler programming
Thanks very much those who replied to this.  You've given me
some very useful places to start.

Dan
--
http://www.dur.ac.uk/~d71tbg



Sat, 10 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Windows 95/98/NT assembler programming
D.C.
Izcelion's win32 assembly page is a great start.  Do a search for Win32
assembly language tutorials on yahoo.  Also dolphin has a good site.
Sorry I can't give you any addresses right now.  I a lazy bastid.  If
you have any specific questions feel free to ask, but get ready to learn
the API inside and out ;).

--Invisible Dragon

Quote:

> Hello all.  I'm looking for good books/online
> tutorials/whatever to get me started on this subject.  I've
> programmed an 8086 under DOS before, but have no experience
> of Windows programming or the extended 386+ instruction set
> or modes (weird scary stuff).

> All my searches so far point to just one book, by Barry
> Kauler, which seems to have mixed reviews (on the lines of
> "it's ok, not great but there's no alternative anyway"!).

> For a while now I've wanted to learn this but put it off,
> but finally I'm so sick and tired of huge, slow applications
> that I want to write my own, and write them well in the only
> REAL programming language  -  and show those who say stuff
> like "a modern optimising C compiler produces code just as
> good...", or "it's impossible to write large programs in
> assembler" that they are wrong, or die trying.

> Anybody got any tips?

> cheers,
> Dan
> --
> http://www.dur.ac.uk/~d71tbg



Thu, 15 Aug 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Windows 95/98/NT assembler programming
Hi. Try "Programming the 80286,80386,80486, and pentium-based personal
computer", by Barry B. Brey. Very good book.
Quote:

> Hello all.  I'm looking for good books/online
> tutorials/whatever to get me started on this subject.  I've
> programmed an 8086 under DOS before, but have no experience
> of Windows programming or the extended 386+ instruction set
> or modes (weird scary stuff).

> All my searches so far point to just one book, by Barry
> Kauler, which seems to have mixed reviews (on the lines of
> "it's ok, not great but there's no alternative anyway"!).

> For a while now I've wanted to learn this but put it off,
> but finally I'm so sick and tired of huge, slow applications
> that I want to write my own, and write them well in the only
> REAL programming language  -  and show those who say stuff
> like "a modern optimising C compiler produces code just as
> good...", or "it's impossible to write large programs in
> assembler" that they are wrong, or die trying.

> Anybody got any tips?

> cheers,
> Dan
> --
> http://www.dur.ac.uk/~d71tbg



Sat, 21 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 9 post ] 

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