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 textbooks

 I will be teaching assembly programming and I am trying to find a good
textbook. Any experience and suggestions?

 Thanks, Ned



Sat, 12 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 textbooks


Quote:

>  I will be teaching assembly programming and I am trying to find a good
> textbook. Any experience and suggestions?

>  Thanks, Ned

Hi Ned,

Here's a few thoughts :-

"IBM PC Assembly Language and Programming (3rd Ed)" (ISBN 0-13-317729-7)
Published by Prentice-Hall.  Assembler required: MASM, TASM (MASM mode)
Typical textbook (complete with answers to "selected" questions at the back
:-)) format, and covers roughly to the 386 instruction set.  Also doubles to
a very useful reference to the common DOS and BIOS calls, the BIOS data
area, etc.  The only down-side is that if you're looking to teach
protected-mode programming, you're outta luck.  As a textbook for beginners,
this is my best suggestion.

"Mastering Turbo Assembler (2nd Ed)" (ISBN 0-672-30526-7)
Published by SAMS Publishing.  Assembler required: TASM's (IDEAL mode)
Well structured, and well written book with a fair bit of useful advice.
Covers upto, and including, the 486 and comes with a disk with the complete
source code.  While it does have a chapter devoted to introducing windows
programming, it also doesn't cover PM programming.  If you/your class
doesn't have TASM 4, or better, skip this one.  However, it does use TASM's
IDEAL mode which IMO is pretty good for beginners.

"Master Class Assembly Language" (ISBN 1-874416-34-6)
Published By WROX Press Ltd.  Assembler required: MASM
Though the optimization stuff is dated (covers upto early Pentium), the rest
of the book is actually useful.  It covers a decent range of "advanced"
programming topics (ie. writing drivers, sound-programming, writing code
libraries, graphics, disassembly, etc.).  Definately NOT for beginners, but
could come in handy.  Does cover PM programming in resonable detail, and
probably will be useful if you teach your class for a second, or further,
years.

Well, appart from the writings of Mr. Knuth, that's about the extent of my
book-shelf.  Best of luck ;-)

-Brent
doomsday AT optusnet DOT com DOT au



Sun, 13 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 textbooks

Quote:

>  I will be teaching assembly programming and I am trying to find a good
> textbook. Any experience and suggestions?

>  Thanks, Ned

I've never taught assembly, but when i was taking it, for various
processors, i know that i wished that i had one that covered as much as
Randall Hyde's Art Of Assembly! I'm someone who like to know as much as
i can, even if it's not covered in the book! AOA does this, and i
believe that this is what Randall uses when he teaches assembley.

You can find it on

http://webster.cs.ucr.edu/asm/ArtOfAsm.html

fwiw!

Russ



Sun, 13 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 textbooks
There are a couple other books to add to the list:

"The 80X86 IBM PC and Compatible Computers (Volumes I and II) Assembly Language,
Design, and Interfacing Second Edition" by Muhammad Ali Mazidi and Janice
Gillispie Mazidi ... Published by Prentice-Hall ISBN: 0-13-758509-8 --- A very
good book IMHO because of its detailed and thorough explanations of not only the
basics of assembly language for the X86 microprocessors but also components
specific to the IBM PC and PC-compatibles. A lot of the sections describe the
hardware of the IBM PC in almost gruesome detail... nice to know but it could be
daunting to your students unless they are electrical engineers or something =)
The programming parts are thorough and _very_ well explained, it even included
an overview of key number systems: decimal, binary, hexadecimal, and octal. No
protected mode here. It explains it, but makes no attempt at teaching the reader
how to do it =( Overall this is a rich book with great material -- but the $100
price tag is a bit heavy. I'd recommend looking over it before buying.

"The Intel Microprocessors 8086/8088, 80186/80188, 80286, 80386, 80486, Pentium,
and Pentium Pro Processor: Architecture, Programming, and Interfacing Fourth
Edition" by Barry B. Brey ... Published by Prentice-Hall ISBN: 0-13-260670-4 ---
Another well done book that is as good if not better than the above listing.
Easy to understand, covers programming for the X86 family extremely well, it
also explains hardware but in a much less daunting way than the other book I
mentioned. I would recommend this for beginner programmers because it is
complete, it also covers advanced stuff like programming PC-specific supporting
chips -- the timer, the interrupt controller, etc. This book included an
overview of protected mode and some code but probably not good enough to learn
protected mode. Practically the entire book is in real mode. Protected mode is a
hard topic and I don't think many (if any) textbooks cover it well. This book is
a great introduction and reference. It carries a hefty price tag so I'd check it
out first also.

Browse the shelves of your university's library. A lot of good books can be
found there.

Regards,

Bart Trzynadlowski

Quote:



> >  I will be teaching assembly programming and I am trying to find a good
> > textbook. Any experience and suggestions?

> >  Thanks, Ned

> Hi Ned,

> Here's a few thoughts :-

> "IBM PC Assembly Language and Programming (3rd Ed)" (ISBN 0-13-317729-7)
> Published by Prentice-Hall.  Assembler required: MASM, TASM (MASM mode)
> Typical textbook (complete with answers to "selected" questions at the back
> :-)) format, and covers roughly to the 386 instruction set.  Also doubles to
> a very useful reference to the common DOS and BIOS calls, the BIOS data
> area, etc.  The only down-side is that if you're looking to teach
> protected-mode programming, you're outta luck.  As a textbook for beginners,
> this is my best suggestion.

> "Mastering Turbo Assembler (2nd Ed)" (ISBN 0-672-30526-7)
> Published by SAMS Publishing.  Assembler required: TASM's (IDEAL mode)
> Well structured, and well written book with a fair bit of useful advice.
> Covers upto, and including, the 486 and comes with a disk with the complete
> source code.  While it does have a chapter devoted to introducing windows
> programming, it also doesn't cover PM programming.  If you/your class
> doesn't have TASM 4, or better, skip this one.  However, it does use TASM's
> IDEAL mode which IMO is pretty good for beginners.

> "Master Class Assembly Language" (ISBN 1-874416-34-6)
> Published By WROX Press Ltd.  Assembler required: MASM
> Though the optimization stuff is dated (covers upto early Pentium), the rest
> of the book is actually useful.  It covers a decent range of "advanced"
> programming topics (ie. writing drivers, sound-programming, writing code
> libraries, graphics, disassembly, etc.).  Definately NOT for beginners, but
> could come in handy.  Does cover PM programming in resonable detail, and
> probably will be useful if you teach your class for a second, or further,
> years.

> Well, appart from the writings of Mr. Knuth, that's about the extent of my
> book-shelf.  Best of luck ;-)

> -Brent
> doomsday AT optusnet DOT com DOT au



Tue, 15 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 textbooks

Try "PC Architecture & Assembly Language" by Barry Kauler

The book I used to learn ASM, has exercises and info from the Hardware and
DOS to OS/2 and Windows. It's written in a hyper text fashion which makes
it easy to jump to related sections within the book.

Barry Kauler (the author) is a university lecturer teaching ASM........
catch my drift....

Later,
        John

Quote:

>  I will be teaching assembly programming and I am trying to find a good
> textbook. Any experience and suggestions?

>  Thanks, Ned



Sat, 19 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 textbooks


Quote:

>  I will be teaching assembly programming and I am trying to find a good
> textbook. Any experience and suggestions?

>  Thanks, Ned



Sat, 19 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 textbooks
   Ned,

     Although I am not an Assembly 'master', nor even at the intermediate
level of Assembly programming, I may be in a better position to answer your
question because of the very fact that I am a beginner.   I am in the
process of learning Intel DOS Assembly, and I am reading as many books as I
can find on it as well as doing my best to learn about various books I may
want to get.   I've delved a tiny bit into 32 bit code, but really only when
I tear apart the code I find on the net...   A frustrating yet instructive
hobby.   Anyway, here is what I thought to say:
     The first thing I would suggest is to either have the school or all of
your Assembly students order item#s:   243190, 243191, 243192, 24281603,
24369101, 24368901, 24369001   From Intel Corp. for FREE.   These are:  The
'Intel Architecture Software Developer's Manual' Vol 1, 2 and 3, the Pentium
Processor Specifications Update, and the Intel Architecture Optimization
Manual.   Plus all the Addendums.   The number to order these books/manuals
from is 1.800.548.4725   I'm not positive that all of the item numbers above
are in the respective order of the books I listed, but the numbers listed
correspond to all the needed items.
     These make excellent references, especially volumes 2 amd 3.   Volume 2
is the Instruction Set Reference, and it is absolutely necessary to have a
good reference for all of the instructions.   Volume 3 is the System
Programming Guide, which I find to be an excellent reference for interrupts
and such, although it is certainly no replacement to Ralph Brown's Interrupt
List.   You can write me privately if you want me to find that URL
(interrupt list), I have it somewhere but it's not hard to find on the net,
especially if you look in past posts to this ng.   Just look for questions
about interrupts, almost invariably someone proves a point with Mr Brown's
list.   I'd like to print it out but things like that just don't seem as
important  as coding (read: fun) when there is free time, and I don't know
if it is even allowed by the owner.   I would like to see such references
like that in our schools, though.
     In regards to Volume 1, Basic Architecture, I feel that it makes a good
reference for the system but there are other books which do quite a better
job of explaining CPU and how programming works on the siliconic level
(which is vitally important when learning to understand Assembly).   One
such book stands above the rest for me, and that is Jeff Duntemann's
'Assembly Language: Step By Step'.
     'Assembly Language: Step By Step' is fairly hands on as book, but it
does not prompt one to start writing and study interactively, it relies on
the student's desire or the teacher's reenforcement of the material.   It
also does not give you built-in assignments.   It's real power is because if
a student studies the book, writes code and really deals with the concepts,
this book does an excellent job of making the physical architecture and it's
connection to Assembly well understood.   This is necessary for any kind of
a real understanding of Assembly, combine that with it being much overlooked
and you have a major reason why students don't 'get it' Assembly.   Mr
Duntemann's book makes sure that every tool used in the book is easily
available to the general public, which is a lot more helpful than it may
seem at first.   It is a great book for teachers who 'work' the book, really
using all of the book's strengths to teach concepts, Mr Duntemann has done
an excellent job of explaining things and with a good teacher's added
instruction the concepts should all be well understood.      He devotes an
entire chapter to JED (available as shareware) which is the text editor he
wrote for use with Assembly, but he explains thing in terms of any text
editor, and points that out well.   An extra, he discusses the differences
between the two most common assemblers and helps the student to use both
MASM and TASM (or choose between the two).   The book does not go deeply
into 32 bit Assembly, but I feel that this is well made up for in that it
does such a good job of explaining the basics.
     One thing which I would really like to encourage you in, is to use the
full versions of A86 and D86.   I'm not sure of the full versions' names, I
am thinking A386 and D386, maybe?   Go to the website for specific info.
They are the assembler/disassembler set which Eric Isaacson wrote.   If your
school does not already have an assembler, you really should consider A86.
It is an excellent assembler, engaging a simple, intuitive set of assembler
instruction while handling the optimizations and chores needed for excellent
32 bit assembling.   To check it all out, go to:  www.eji.com and download a
free shareware copy of the assembler (check out the manual and check out the
cool ERDEMO demonstration of the error reporting system.   I think that you
will find that not only is his statement true that A86 is '...the finest
assembler for any price, at any terms.' (meaning; shareware, packaged,
etc.), but that the price of the software is incredibly good compared to any
assembler which comes anywhere near the speed or quality of A86.   Another
plus is that A86 will assemble programs written for TASM or MASM because it
understands the extra instructions they need (though A86 doesnt need them).
The real endor{*filter*}t is that I am registering my copy of A86 soon, and when
I do I will be paying the highest level to get the extra tools and printed
manual.   For everything it will be less than $100 US.
     Good Luck!

Seth K.


Quote:

>  I will be teaching assembly programming and I am trying to find a good
> textbook. Any experience and suggestions?

>  Thanks, Ned



Sun, 20 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 textbooks

Quote:

>         The first thing I would suggest is to either have the school or all of

> your Assembly students order item#s:   243190, 243191, 243192, 24281603,
> 24369101, 24368901, 24369001   From Intel Corp. for FREE.   These are:  The
> 'Intel Architecture Software Developer's Manual' Vol 1, 2 and 3, the Pentium
> Processor Specifications Update, and the Intel Architecture Optimization
> Manual.   Plus all the Addendums.   The number to order these books/manuals
> from is 1.800.548.4725   I'm not positive that all of the item numbers above
> are in the respective order of the books I listed, but the numbers listed
> correspond to all the needed items.

I agree - the IASDM is an excellent reference.  On a lighter note, when I
ordered Volume 2 (from Intel UK), pages 3-211 to 3-258 occurred twice and pages
3-163 to 3-210 were missing.  I must get round to ordering another copy.

Martin.

--
The higher,
The fewer.



Sat, 02 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 8 post ] 

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