windows programming tutorials 
Author Message
 windows programming tutorials

Hi all!

I've just started with Ada (my first love, er... language) and I really
love it (I'm presently tinkering with ASM also - very challenging!). Ada
is simply powerful and elegant. I tried different forms of Basic, C, and
Euphoria, but it's with Ada that I got stuck with. I'm thinking of doing
MS Windows programming using Ada in the very near future (two months at
the most :)) when I become a little bit more proficient with the
language. I'd like to know if there are any tutorials out there on how I
should go about this (I get the impression that tutorials are not as
popular with the Ada folks as they are with the ASM cracker/hacker
groups). I don't have money right now to invest in ObjectAda nor Claw
(the demo versions are practically useless anyway) so I decided to do it
the tedious way (I think I'm getting too much influenced by the ASM
mentality :)). I'm using GNAT 3.11p for Windows and AdaGIDE and GRASP as
IDE's.
Thanks in advance!

kryptoz

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Fri, 25 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials
See:

http://www.adapower.com/windows

and

http://www.adapower.com/com

See the examples there, and take a look at the source code for GWindows,
AdaGIDE, Windex, and other open source projects.

Also check out Jerry's Ada on Windows site http://stad.dsl.nl/%7Ejvandyk/

David Botton

Quote:

>Hi all!

>I've just started with Ada (my first love, er... language) and I really
>love it (I'm presently tinkering with ASM also - very challenging!). Ada
>is simply powerful and elegant. I tried different forms of Basic, C, and
>Euphoria, but it's with Ada that I got stuck with. I'm thinking of doing
>MS Windows programming using Ada in the very near future (two months at
>the most :)) when I become a little bit more proficient with the
>language. I'd like to know if there are any tutorials out there on how I
>should go about this (I get the impression that tutorials are not as
>popular with the Ada folks as they are with the ASM cracker/hacker
>groups). I don't have money right now to invest in ObjectAda nor Claw
>(the demo versions are practically useless anyway) so I decided to do it
>the tedious way (I think I'm getting too much influenced by the ASM
>mentality :)). I'm using GNAT 3.11p for Windows and AdaGIDE and GRASP as
>IDE's.
>Thanks in advance!

>kryptoz

>Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
>Share what you know. Learn what you don't.



Fri, 25 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials

Quote:

>language. I'd like to know if there are any tutorials out there on how I

There's the lovelace tutorial by David A Wheeler at
http://www.adahome.com/Tutorials/Lovelace/lovelace.html

Quote:
>mentality :)). I'm using GNAT 3.11p for Windows and AdaGIDE and GRASP as

<mumbles something about emacs being the one true editor>

- Aidan
--
Gimme money, gimme sex, gimme UNIX and root access.
http://www.skinner.demon.co.uk/aidan/



Fri, 25 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials
Quote:
> ... and take a look at the source code for GWindows,
> AdaGIDE, Windex, and other open source projects.

  And the 2MB of open .ads & .adb files in the CLAW demo at
www.rrsoftware.com


Fri, 25 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials

Quote:


> >language. I'd like to know if there are any tutorials out there on
how I

> There's the lovelace tutorial by David A Wheeler at
> http://www.adahome.com/Tutorials/Lovelace/lovelace.html

> >mentality :)). I'm using GNAT 3.11p for Windows and AdaGIDE and
GRASP as

> <mumbles something about emacs being the one true editor>

> - Aidan
> --
> Gimme money, gimme sex, gimme UNIX and root access.
> http://www.skinner.demon.co.uk/aidan/

The Lovelace tutorial is nice but it doesn't say anything about Win32
programming. Moreover, it doesn't have many code examples (at least the
ones I feel are important). Right now I'm reading Feldman and
Koffman's "Ada 95 Problem Solving and Program Design" (the electronic
edition) and I find it much more useful pedagogically (although I don't
agree so much with their not using "use".) I started last Thursday and
today I'm struggling to finish the fifth chapter. I hope to finish the
book this month and continue with an intermediate/advanced text next
month and finish with Win32 programming using Ada in October.
Regarding Emacs I have tried it before and I find it very interesting.
But right now I'm really concentrated on learning Ada and just don't
have the time to learn the intricacies of an editor such as Emacs.

kryptoz

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Fri, 25 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials


Quote:
> See:

> http://www.adapower.com/windows

> and

> http://www.adapower.com/com

> See the examples there, and take a look at the source code for
GWindows,
> AdaGIDE, Windex, and other open source projects.

> Also check out Jerry's Ada on Windows site http://stad.dsl.nl/%
7Ejvandyk/

> David Botton

I have visited your site a number of times before already and I find it
very nice. In fact I've downloaded some stuff from there and I find
them very interesting. But I didn't find any tutorials on Win32
programming using Ada there (nor in Jerry's site). Or maybe I just have
to wait till I become more proficient in Ada (and stop being a newbie)
and find it out myself? In many asm sites I know there are so many
tutorials on Win32 programming using Assembly, but it's very difficult
to find such information in Ada sites. It seems like there aren't any
newbies amongst Ada programmers. Everyone seems to be a guru.
Thanks.

kryptos

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Sat, 26 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials
Once you learn Ada, a couple of quick looks at some Win32 examples should be
enough to transfer over knowledge you have in the C / C++ world for
programming Win32. If you don't have a background in Win32 programming then
things get a little more difficult. In that case I would first suggest
deciding what your goal is, to learn Win32 APIs or to just write Ada
software that runs on Windows. The two are different goals with different
paths.

If you are looking to write Ada software that runs on Windows, learn how to
use one of the GUI frameworks from http://www.adapower.com/windows

If you are looking to learn Win32, I would recommend Petzold's Programming
Windows and translating example by example to Ada as a start.

David Botton

Quote:

> Or maybe I just have
>to wait till I become more proficient in Ada (and stop being a newbie)
>and find it out myself? In many asm sites I know there are so many
>tutorials on Win32 programming using Assembly, but it's very difficult
>to find such information in Ada sites. It seems like there aren't any
>newbies amongst Ada programmers. Everyone seems to be a guru.
>Thanks.

>kryptos

>Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
>Share what you know. Learn what you don't.



Sat, 26 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials


Quote:

> and find it out myself? In many asm sites I know there are so many
> tutorials on Win32 programming using Assembly, but it's very difficult
> to find such information in Ada sites. It seems like there aren't any

That's a bit more understandable for an Assembly site, because Assembly
is a completely different programming paradigm than C. Ada and C are
both procedural languages, so the basics of doing Win32 programming in
Ada are not significatly changed from doing it in C. There are some
rather stark differences between the two, but generally those
differences need have little impact on Win32 programming. If you want,
you can take a set of thin bindings and a C-based tutorial and you
should have little trouble.

--
T.E.D.

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Sat, 26 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials


Quote:
> edition) and I find it much more useful pedagogically (although I
don't
> agree so much with their not using "use".) I started last Thursday and

At the risk of starting it up again, there was a raging debate on this
subject a week or two ago. If you have no problem with the "use" clause,
you are in good company. But as an anit-user myself, I think you should
probably at least hear the arguments on both sides. For that reason I
suggest you try to dig up that thread on deja.com next time you get a
couple of spare hours.

Quote:
> Regarding Emacs I have tried it before and I find it very interesting.
> But right now I'm really concentrated on learning Ada and just don't
> have the time to learn the intricacies of an editor such as Emacs.

The NT version of emacs is quite usable as an editor by just usnig the
arrow keys, the mouse, and the menus. I'd suggest using it like that for
starters. You can learn what else is available incrementally. That's how
I learned it.

--
T.E.D.

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Sat, 26 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials


Quote:
> The NT version of emacs is quite usable as an editor by just
usnig the
> arrow keys, the mouse, and the menus. I'd suggest using it
like that for
> starters. You can learn what else is available incrementally.
That's how
> I learned it.

If you are an NT only user, you probably want to use EMACS
configured to have the NT look and feel, rather than the
normal Unix L&F.

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Sat, 26 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials

Quote:
> If you are an NT only user, you probably want to use EMACS
> configured to have the NT look and feel, rather than the
> normal Unix L&F.

Except that the NT l&f is very, very slow. The beautiful thing about Emacs
is having the most used keys on the home row and under the index fingers.

If it weren't such a hard habit to break, i'd switch caps-lock to control.

I'm not looking to start a war about this, just thought I'd state that
everyone should at least *try* the emacs l&f before switching it to NT.

-John



Sun, 27 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials


Quote:

> Except that the NT l&f is very, very slow. The beautiful thing
about Emacs
> is having the most used keys on the home row and under the
index fingers.

> If it weren't such a hard habit to break, i'd switch caps-lock
to control.

> I'm not looking to start a war about this, just thought I'd
state that
> everyone should at least *try* the emacs l&f before switching

it to NT.

Well I was simply giving my advice based on experience. Most
NT folks will dislke the standard L&F, simply because it is
so unfamiliar. The "so slow" comment is probably irrelevant'
to many NT users who much prefer using the mouse to cryptic
key sequences. The trouble with the standard EMACS L&F is that
it can easily put people off completely very quickly if they
are used to a windowsy environment, and it is important to
know that you do NOT have to live with what you may well
perceive (quite reasonably) from a Winwdows point of view
as a junky interface.

In my experience, the ONLY people who have felt as John does
are those who learn EMACS in a Unix environment and then come
to a NT environment later.

Quote:

> -John

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Sun, 27 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials

Quote:

> If it weren't such a hard habit to break, i'd switch caps-lock to control.

I did just this on my Sun box, and converted the alt/graph key to a
right
control key (otherwise typing C-A etc is {*filter*}). It is now much easier
for me to switch between Sun and Windows keyboards.

This doesn't have much to do with Ada, does it?



Sun, 27 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials


Quote:
> Once you learn Ada, a couple of quick looks at some Win32 examples
>should be enough to transfer over knowledge you have in the C / C++
>world for programming Win32. If you don't have a background in Win32
>programming then things get a little more difficult. In that case I
>would first suggest deciding what your goal is, to learn Win32 APIs or
>to just write Ada software that runs on Windows. The two are different
>goals with different paths.

Actually I want both. I want to be able to write software that runs on
Windows and also to be able to do Win32 programming using Ada and not
C/C++. The first one is of course more easy as there are a number of
tools like ObjectAda, Claw, Windex, WinAda, etc.,which one can use
(these last two are still a mystery for me at this stage of my Ada
ignorance). The second one, I understand, is more difficult as one has
to rely on one's own resources to be able to do it, but it gives one
more freedom to do whatever one wants. But, of course, first I have to
learn well my Ada and then the Win32 APIs :) :).

kryptoz

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Mon, 28 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 windows programming tutorials

: Actually I want both. I want to be able to write software that runs on
: Windows and also to be able to do Win32 programming using Ada and not
: C/C++.

You have two challenges ahead of you:

a) learn Ada programming
b) learn Windows programming

and than combine them.

Apart from some C-isms remaining in the current Win32 API for Ada, programming
Windows applications in Ada is not very much different than programming them
in C or C++.

--
-- Jerry van Dijk | Leiden, Holland

-- see http://stad.dsl.nl/~jvandyk



Mon, 28 Jan 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
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