Beginners moving up. 
Author Message
 Beginners moving up.

This question is answered nicely but my interpretation is that the question is of a beginning level nature.  The question is hard to understand. Configuration allows one to alter a model by changing as little as one line in the configuration file.

Some personal background:
This answer is off the top of my head.  I thought I was a VHDL expert, I wrote a tutorial for the master degree program in VLSI design on VHDL.  But now I'm a BSEE graduate with no engineering work.  I work temp as a technical writer.  So I'll start the master degree program next month and hope that the jop market finds a need for VHDL writers.  I thought my skill would be a hot job getter.  Most companies are technicaly behind by a generation or what.  VHDL is DOD required.  My question is are there VHDL

writing jobs?  Will there be VHDL writing jobs in two years for MSEE graduates?



Wed, 24 Jan 1996 01:49:00 GMT  
 Beginners moving up.

AMx> a generation or what.  VHDL is DOD required.  My question is are there
AMx> VHDL writing jobs?  Will there be VHDL writing jobs in two years for MSEE
AMx> graduates?

[I'll probably get my knees kicked in for this, but what-the-hey...]

"VHDL writers" are cheap.  I can send a few halfway bright folks to a technical
institute or communinty college to teach them how to *write* VHDL. (or Verilog
or Ada or...)  That's the easy part.

On the other hand, good designers are quite difficult to find.  A good designer
has an uncommon mix of creativity and ability to express that creativity in a
realizeable form in such a way that others can benefit and make use of their
creation.  VHDL just so happens to be an excellent medium of design expression,
and is an extremely useful tool.

Good designers can always find a job, although you might have to relocate to
the current hot spot in the country.  Technical writing skills are becoming
more important with the larger projects, so don't lose that skill.



Wed, 24 Jan 1996 02:53:24 GMT  
 Beginners moving up.


Quote:
(Todd Carpenter) writes:

>AMx> a generation or what.  VHDL is DOD required.  My question is are
>AMx> there VHDL writing jobs?  Will there be VHDL writing jobs in
>AMx> two years for MSEE graduates?

>  [I'll probably get my knees kicked in for this, but what-the-hey...]

>  ...

>  On the other hand, good designers are quite difficult to find.  A good
>  designer has an uncommon mix of creativity and ability to express that
>  creativity in a realizable form in such a way that others can benefit and
>  make use of their creation.  VHDL just so happens to be an excellent medium
>  of design expression, and is an extremely useful tool.

I think Todd has hit the nail on the head.  A truly good designer, one who
can solve problems creatively and efficiently, is a relatively rare animal.
Such a designer has the skills to attack a problem at the macro level as well
as at the micro level.  "Top-down design" is a natural for such a person,
with VHDL (or Verilog) being nothing more than an enabling technology.
Unfortunately, American society hasn't seen the importance of being able
to deal with problems simultaneously at both levels (macro and micro),
as reflected in school curricula.

We constantly deal with this issue at Qualis.  As a top-down design service
provider that's growing very rapidly, we're constantly looking for
"good designers" that can think at both levels.  We've found that such traits
usually permeate the designers life, not just between the hours of 9 and 5.
How did they become "good designers?"  A small amount is probably attributable
to genetics (a "gift"), but I think it's a frame of mind that starts early
in life and is encouraged throughout the engineer's life.  As the saying goes,
practice makes perfect.

The encouraging thing (I believe) is that engineers that wish to learn to
become "good designers" can do so by 1) being open to the idea that a paradigm
change is necessary, and 2) leveraging off the expertise of exemplary good
designers (that is, using them as mentors).  Of course, the work environment
must support (and encourage) such activities if it is to be successful.
Organizations that lack the infrastructure for such learning usually have
a tough time obtaining the benefits (efficiency gains, etc) of top-down design.
There's more to it than just buying the latest VHDL or Verilog tools and
shipping the engineers to a one-week class in the Bay Area.

Quote:
>  Good designers can always find a job, although you might have to relocate
>  to the current hot spot in the country...

I firmly believe that designers with the above mentioned skills will
retain career security, though they will likely work for a multitude of
companies over the span of their lifetimes.  Similarly, *companies* that
encourage the development of such engineers will likely remain in business
(and be profitable) over the long run.

Mike



Thu, 25 Jan 1996 10:57:53 GMT  
 
 [ 3 post ] 

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