Ruby browser similar to Smalltalk browsers? 
Author Message
 Ruby browser similar to Smalltalk browsers?

Hi,

This quote on amazon.com from an interview of some Ruby authours caught
my attention:

'In late 2001, someone will release a Ruby browser similar to VisualAge
and the Smalltalk browsers.'

Is there any news on this feature or release?

Please excuse me for not searching first the Ruby FAQs and sites. I know
little about Ruby, nor developments with its tools. Good code browsers
certainly offer a distinct advantage.

Thanks. John Clarke



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 03:28:28 GMT  
 Ruby browser similar to Smalltalk browsers?
Quote:
----- Original Message -----

Newsgroups: comp.lang.ruby,comp.lang.smalltalk

Sent: Monday, February 11, 2002 1:30 PM
Subject: Ruby browser similar to Smalltalk browsers?

> This quote on amazon.com from an interview of some Ruby authours caught
> my attention:

> 'In late 2001, someone will release a Ruby browser similar to VisualAge
> and the Smalltalk browsers.'

> Is there any news on this feature or release?

Hmm. I'm not sure what was being referred to there.

There are some existing browsers (check the archive at
www.ruby-lang.org)... my impression is that most of these
are rather rudimentary or proof-of-concept. (That's not a
flame, and may not even be accurate.)

I agree with you that good tools make a world of difference.

My money at the moment is on the FreeRIDE project
(www.rubyide.org), spearheaded by Curt Hibbs. There
is already some code (much of it written by Rich Kilmer,
who codes like the wind) but at present it is even more
alpha-ware than any of the others, I think.

One nice thing about this project is that it has so many
programmers that they can't all be lazy at once. As for me,
I haven't yet contributed a single line of code...

Cheers,
Hal Fulton



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 03:43:24 GMT  
 Ruby browser similar to Smalltalk browsers?

# My money at the moment is on the FreeRIDE project
# (www.rubyide.org), spearheaded by Curt Hibbs. There
# is already some code (much of it written by Rich Kilmer,
# who codes like the wind)

An understatement to put it mildly - the guy breathes code, and without it
turns purple. Just try to have a long conversation, even by chat, with
him -- he starts gasping and gagging and begging to return to his laptop.

I'm not kidding!

#but at present it is even more
# alpha-ware than any of the others, I think.
#
# One nice thing about this project is that it has so many
# programmers that they can't all be lazy at once. As for me,
# I haven't yet contributed a single line of code...
#

Aaahhh, the "dozing programmer" problem, which, like the "dining
philosopher" problem upon which it is based, is centered around a few simple
activities:

        * Eating
        * Coding
        * Sleeping
        * Answering Newsgroup mail

Oddly enough, no matter what algorithm you use to write it, by far the most
time consuming task for each developer in the simulation always ends up
being "answering newsgroup mail"... sleeping is of course dead last in the
list by a long shot... eating and coding are about the same but combined
constitute only about 15% of the time...

Wonder why...

 ;)

-- Bob Calco

# Cheers,
# Hal Fulton



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 03:59:42 GMT  
 Ruby browser similar to Smalltalk browsers?

Quote:

> I agree with you that good tools make a world of difference.

> My money at the moment is on the FreeRIDE project
> (www.rubyide.org), spearheaded by Curt Hibbs. There
> is already some code (much of it written by Rich Kilmer,
> who codes like the wind) but at present it is even more
> alpha-ware than any of the others, I think.

Actually, Rich has written *all* of the code, so far -- very impressive (and
humbling).

The truth is, that this project *is* in the very early stages, but Rich has
made lots of progress coding the plugin architecture on which *everything*
else will be based, and I just finished laying out a design for the visual
components.

Quote:
> One nice thing about this project is that it has so many
> programmers that they can't all be lazy at once. As for me,
> I haven't yet contributed a single line of code...

Gee... I'm one of the guys to who started this thing, and I haven't written
a line of code yet either!

I also am impressed with how many developer's have signed up to work on
FreeRIDE, and sometimes I worry that they might lose interest because the
project is not yet in a state where all of them can be doing something
(please, please, don't lose interest -- we're moving as fast as we can!).

But we do have the core plugin architecture coded and working, and there is
now enough design work completed on the visual stuff that we can start
coding an initial set of very basic visual components. Once that is done
(hopefully a couple weeks from now) we will have an initial platform that
will allow all of the FreeRIDE developer's to individually and
simultaneously start working on their respective parts.

I don't want to mislead anyone, we are not going to have a full-blown IDE in
a couple weeks (it'll look more like a brain-dead editor). But we *will*
have a development vehicle that will let the FreeRIDE developer's dig in and
start making some real progress.

If you haven't yet check out the FreeRIDE project, please do
(www.rubyide.org). We've set some pretty lofty goals, but we definitely want
to take an XP approach to the project (release early, release often). And,
of course, we can always use more help -- well... at least in a few weeks we
can!  :-)

Curt



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 04:31:50 GMT  
 Ruby browser similar to Smalltalk browsers?

Quote:
> -----Original Message-----

..
> One nice thing about this project is that it has so many
> programmers that they can't all be lazy at once.

Ahh, unless they practice XLP: eXtremely Lazy Programming.

James

Quote:

> Cheers,
> Hal Fulton



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 08:11:36 GMT  
 Ruby browser similar to Smalltalk browsers?

Quote:

> > 'In late 2001, someone will release a Ruby browser similar to VisualAge
> > and the Smalltalk browsers.'

> > Is there any news on this feature or release?

> Hmm. I'm not sure what was being referred to there.

> There are some existing browsers (check the archive at
> www.ruby-lang.org)... my impression is that most of these
> are rather rudimentary or proof-of-concept. (That's not a
> flame, and may not even be accurate.)

Thanks for the pointers, Hal. I've not tried Ruby, but will stay tuned -
plans for FreeRIDE include class and refactoring browsers, I read. Good
stuff. I guess the 'late 2001' date reference was a bit optimistic.

John

Quote:

> I agree with you that good tools make a world of difference.

> My money at the moment is on the FreeRIDE project
> (www.rubyide.org), spearheaded by Curt Hibbs. There
> is already some code (much of it written by Rich Kilmer,
> who codes like the wind) but at present it is even more
> alpha-ware than any of the others, I think.

> One nice thing about this project is that it has so many
> programmers that they can't all be lazy at once. As for me,
> I haven't yet contributed a single line of code...

> Cheers,
> Hal Fulton



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 14:12:24 GMT  
 Ruby browser similar to Smalltalk browsers?

Quote:

> Thanks for the pointers, Hal. I've not tried Ruby, but will stay
> tuned - plans for FreeRIDE include class and refactoring browsers, I
> read. Good stuff. I guess the 'late 2001' date reference was a bit
> optimistic.

Unfortunately (says the person who made the prediction). At the time a
couple of companies were talking about taking on the project (and one
subsequently did make a start). However, I think the downturn took its
toll, and energy went to projects with more immediate returns.

Don't let the lack stop you from trying Ruby though. Unlike many
languages, Ruby is still a good code even with a simple editor. As
well as our old favorites v&e, there's good support using SciTE under
Windows. Try it and see!

Dave



Sat, 31 Jul 2004 14:25:36 GMT  
 Ruby browser similar to Smalltalk browsers?

Quote:

> Hi,

> This quote on amazon.com from an interview of some Ruby authours caught
> my attention:

> 'In late 2001, someone will release a Ruby browser similar to VisualAge
> and the Smalltalk browsers.'

> Is there any news on this feature or release?

> Please excuse me for not searching first the Ruby FAQs and sites. I know
> little about Ruby, nor developments with its tools. Good code browsers
> certainly offer a distinct advantage.

> Thanks. John Clarke

Although it's probably not what you are looking for per se, you can try
RBBR, which can be found included in the Ruby/GTK package. (found on the
RAA) It allows you to browse files, classes and modules in a GTK+
windowing environment similar to the Smalltalk class browser, but does
not allow for editing. It is merely a reference. I find it useful. Have
fun :)

--
<< T o b i a s   D i P a s q u a l e >>

"Bill Gates comes to visit SoftImage and during an employee Q/A someone asks
'Since the Internet is all about free software, how come Microsoft is still
charging for it?'"

 -- Adam Barr, "Proudly Serving My Corporate Masters"



Sun, 01 Aug 2004 05:18:03 GMT  
 
 [ 10 post ] 

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