Card Columns (was Why did they make ... ?) 
Author Message
 Card Columns (was Why did they make ... ?)


Quote:


>>BTW, I do agree with the poster that the 36 bit
>>machine had something to do with the 72 column
>>card limit but I seem to recall the 407 (??) accounting
>>machine only had 72 columns of print out as well
>>and maybe it impacted this limit as well.
>That's a common misconception. The 407 could print 120 columns, but
>you had to wire the board to use an extra print cycle for everything
>beyond 72. As I recal the same was true for the unit record equipment
>on the 7090; you could get more than 72 columns, but there was a
>performance cost.

No.  If all you're doing is an 80-80 list (or anything similar, for
that matter) you need multiple cycles only if you need to go through
the card's data multiple times.  The 407 was never a speed demon (the
fastest models went at the blinding speed of 150 cards/minute);
requiring extra cycles to get the extra columns would have been
a disaster.

Now...if you're calculating just about anything more complex than
a running sum, you might need to read the card once to figure out
what to do with it, and then read it another time to read the
data.  Similarly, printing subtotals, totals, grand totals,
exception lines, and punching output cards could take one or
more cycles during which the input card stack did not move.

Building a plugboard for the beast was not a trivial task,
especially (as in my case) if the machine was old and cranky. (pun)
At one point I (a paying customer) had to train the CE that the
local BO sent out to work on the machine about the existence (!) and
use of the Dynamic Timer to prove that certain hubs weren't being
pulsed when they were supposed to be.

Quote:
>Trivia; name an oddball function of the "Share board" for the printer
>on the 7090.

Read the Chronolog.

Yes, kiddies, there was an officially documented command to read
the printer.  Its nominal function was to ensure that the printwheels
actually printed the data that was just sent, but a bit of judicious
hacking allowed the printer to be used to interface an external clock.

Joe Morris



Sun, 10 Jul 2005 09:18:57 GMT  
 Card Columns (was Why did they make ... ?)

Quote:


>>Yes, and it printed 120 characters.  Many 407's ended their lives simply
>>pre-printing fortran source to check for accuracy before compiling.
>How did they check?  This is a badly worded question but I
>don't know enough to write a good one.
>I suppose that there could alphanumeric checks and print
>stars around questionable cards.  Or that there were continuation
>cards in places that didn't make much sense.

It did so by preparing the program for evaluation by the Mark I Eyeball.

Joe Morris



Sun, 10 Jul 2005 09:24:54 GMT  
 Card Columns (was Why did they make ... ?)

Quote:

> ISTR the 1442 reader was rated at 600 cpm, and there was a "reed"
> printer, the 1443, that print at about 300 lpm.  The CPU in
> question was called a 1440, as you might expect, and it was
> related to the 1401, although I'm pretty sure it was cheaper.

1440 was the collective name of the system.  Its CPU was the 1441-1, and
it used the 1442 single-feed read/punch and the 1443 printer (and the
optional 1444 punch, when the 1442 was too slow, or separate read and
punch feeds were needed).  It also used the 7335 tape drive, rather than
the 7330 or 729 used by the 1401.  The 1441-2 CPU, on the other hand,
was the CPU of the 1460, which was compatible with the 1401, but about
twice as fast, and used mostly the same peripherals.  One other
difference was the operator console:

System    Console    Optional typewriter
1401      1401       1407 typebar
                      1447 Selectric (w/o console)
1440      1447       Selectric added to the 1447
1460      1447       Selectric added to the 1447

I'm not sure what speed the 1442 read at, but 600 seems high.

Quote:
> On the 360/20, you could get a similar machine that could read,
> punch, and print cards all in one operation. It was termed a
> Multi-Function Card Machine, or MFCM, affectionately known to
> CE's (out of customers' earshot) as a Mother-F***ing
> Card-Mulcher.

The 2560.  The 2520 punch (up to 500 CPM, IBM's fastest punch) and the
card punch of the 1030 factory-floor system (I think it was the 1034,
but I'm not sure) were also variations of the 1442 chassis.  The 2780
RJE station was based on both the 1442 and the 1443.

--
John W. Kennedy
"The poor have sometimes objected to being governed badly;
the rich have always objected to being governed at all."
   -- G. K. Chesterton, "The Man Who Was Thursday"



Sun, 10 Jul 2005 10:53:35 GMT  
 Card Columns (was Why did they make ... ?)
On Tue, 21 Jan 2003 13:45:07 -0700, "Russ Holsclaw"

Quote:

>On the 360/20, you could get a similar machine that could read,
>punch, and print cards all in one operation. It was termed a
>Multi-Function Card Machine, or MFCM, affectionately known to
>CE's (out of customers' earshot) as a Mother-F***ing
>Card-Mulcher.

Oh, come on: one treat all us technical customers loved was
hearing each IBMers' personal collections of acronym expansions

Thanks. Take care, Brian Inglis         Calgary, Alberta, Canada
--

    fake address                use address above to reply






Sun, 10 Jul 2005 15:58:05 GMT  
 Card Columns (was Why did they make ... ?)


Quote:


>>>Yes, and it printed 120 characters.  Many 407's ended their lives simply
>>>pre-printing FORTRAN source to check for accuracy before compiling.

>>How did they check?  This is a badly worded question but I
>>don't know enough to write a good one.

>>I suppose that there could alphanumeric checks and print
>>stars around questionable cards.  Or that there were continuation
>>cards in places that didn't make much sense.

>It did so by preparing the program for evaluation by the Mark I Eyeball.

ROTFL.  I'm finally getting the picture.  Thanks, guys.

/BAH



Sun, 10 Jul 2005 18:08:55 GMT  
 Card Columns (was Why did they make ... ?)

Quote:

>At the University I attended, we had a striped-down IBM 407.  Every once
>in a blue moon, it would be worked on (down), so we had to go to the
>administration office to use theirs.   Wow:   it had every feature except
>floating point divide.  There were cables everywhere --- going to the
>IBM 088 (sorter?, # could be wrong), the keypunch for punching cards,
>another IBM 407 (could have been an IBM 40x printer), some other machine,
>etc.   Apparently, the 407 could keep running totals in decimal and also
>floating point formats.   That particular IBM 407 was almost like a
>computer, with all it's bells and whistles and connected I/O gear.

That doesn't sound quite right, although I make no claim to knowing
all the possible features of the box.

For starters, the 407 knew nothing of floating point.  It could take
digits and do addition and subtraction, and could compare numbers, and
could do leading zero suppression, but only in integers.  (The location
of the decimal point was (literally) hardwired.)

The only attachment I recall for the 407 was to a 519 (?) Summary
Punch.  I've never heard of any ability to tie two 407's together
(not even with the A1 model).  Maybe this was an RPQ machine, or
a *very* late model, or a one-off?  Or something hacked by the
shop?

And are you sure that the admin machine really was a 407?

Finally, getting back to the machine you normally used, did it run
full-speed, or was it an E8 model that skipped every third card
cycle (but if you knew just *which* wire to move, could be made to
run at the full 150 cards/minute speed)?

Joe Morris



Sun, 10 Jul 2005 22:10:15 GMT  
 Card Columns (was Why did they make ... ?)

Quote:
> Oh, come on: one treat all us technical customers loved was
> hearing each IBMers' personal collections of acronym expansions

Yes, but IBM management types, who signed our Payroll
Authorization cards, took a dim view of such expressions,
especially in front of non-IBMers.

One of my favorite pet names for a kludgy IBM machine was the
term "noodle-picker" for the 2321 Data Cell drive.
Also: "noodle-snatcher".

Other pet terms I recall were "Maytag" for the 2311 disk drive,
which somewhat resembled a top-loading washing machine,
and "Pizza Oven" for the 2314 (a large box with 9 disk drives
with removable disk packs). The drives were arranged in an
array of drawer-like compartments, with a handle you pulled to
open them. (Actually, the 2314 seemed more like a morgue to me
than a pizza oven, but that didn't catch on with colleagues.)

I was no longer working in the field when the 3850 Mass Storage
System, with it's honeycomb array of phallic-shaped tape
cartridges, appeared. There must have been some really choice
names for *that* one among CE's.  Anybody heard about that?

Today, I work with a guy who wrote some of the microcode for
that beast, but I'm sure he doesn't know how CE's might have
referred to it.



Mon, 11 Jul 2005 00:18:58 GMT  
 Card Columns (was Why did they make ... ?)

Quote:

> One of my favorite pet names for a kludgy IBM machine was the
> term "noodle-picker" for the 2321 Data Cell drive.
> Also: "noodle-snatcher".

> Other pet terms I recall were "Maytag" for the 2311 disk drive,
> which somewhat resembled a top-loading washing machine,
> and "Pizza Oven" for the 2314 (a large box with 9 disk drives
> with removable disk packs). The drives were arranged in an
> array of drawer-like compartments, with a handle you pulled to
> open them. (Actually, the 2314 seemed more like a morgue to me
> than a pizza oven, but that didn't catch on with colleagues.)

> I was no longer working in the field when the 3850 Mass Storage
> System, with it's honeycomb array of phallic-shaped tape
> cartridges, appeared. There must have been some really choice
> names for *that* one among CE's.  Anybody heard about that?

> Today, I work with a guy who wrote some of the microcode for
> that beast, but I'm sure he doesn't know how CE's might have
> referred to it.

note also ... that it was an EC to interlock the 3850 robot arm when
the door was open ... after an unfortunate mishap

there is also thread that started in comp.arch ... and i cross-posted
to alt.folklore.computers: "Disk drives as commodities" which has pointers
to pictures and descriptions of 2311s, 2314s, 2321s, 2301s, 3330s, etc.

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#70 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003.html#72 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#6 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#7 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#9 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#10 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#14 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2003b.html#15 Disk drives as commodities. Was Re: Yamhill

--

Internet trivia, 20th anniv: http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/rfcietff.htm



Mon, 11 Jul 2005 04:14:39 GMT  
 Card Columns (was Why did they make ... ?)

Quote:

> Yes, but IBM management types, who signed our Payroll
> Authorization cards, took a dim view of such expressions,
> especially in front of non-IBMers.

various references to ibm jargon file at:
http://www.212.net/business/jargon

http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#5 New IBM history book out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#6 New IBM history book out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001g.html#7 New IBM history book out
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001i.html#32 IBM OS Timeline?
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001j.html#35 Military Interest in Supercomputer AI
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2001n.html#79 a.f.c history checkup... (was What specifications will the standard year 2001 PC have?)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002e.html#45 REXX and its designer (was: IBM 7090 instruction set)
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002h.html#7 disk write caching (was: ibm icecube -- return of
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#39 Vnet : Unbelievable
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002k.html#61 arrogance metrics (Benoits) was: general networking
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#24 IBM Selectric as printer
http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/2002o.html#73 They Got Mail: Not-So-Fond Farewells

--

Internet trivia, 20th anniv: http://www.garlic.com/~lynn/rfcietff.htm



Mon, 11 Jul 2005 04:21:36 GMT  
 Card Columns (was Why did they make ... ?)

Quote:


>>DDT *has* to have been a backronym.

> Not to anyone who knows what "Flit" is.  It's more likely a "necessary"
> acronym to which a set of English words had to be found.

That's what a "backronym" is -- one where the alleged "acronym" came
first with the "source phrase" being made up later to fit.

-Larry Jones

I've got an idea for a sit-com called "Father Knows Zilch." -- Calvin



Mon, 11 Jul 2005 05:20:03 GMT  
 
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