Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer 
Author Message
 Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer

I'm converting a program that was written in some version of Pascal or
Pascal like language.  The EXE of the program is a standalone program and
has no explicit copyright notices or other stuff to indicate what compiler
was used.  It runs in plain ol' PC DOS.  I have the source code which is why
I'm asking these questions as there are strangeness in the source code.
The questions that I have are:
Is Pascal a case sensitive language?  The reason for this is that I have
some variables in the subroutines that just don't seem to be properly used
elsewhere and don't seem to be in the var list.
I assume that the :extended keyword after a variable means that the variable
is a double or other extended length variable.
Would I be correct in assuming that the following is a coment:   (*some
text*) (***) and that the comments can run to multiple lines in the first
example?

I aplogize for the simpleness of the questions as I normally program in
assemhly language and use VB as my second language.  I'll also note that
while I can read C, I dislike ti strongly.

--
Bob May
Why is there an Ozone Hole at the South Pole but Not at the North Pole?
Somebody's been lying to you!



Tue, 18 Oct 2005 09:48:30 GMT  
 Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer


Quote:
>Is Pascal a case sensitive language?  

No.

Quote:
>The reason for this is that I have
>some variables in the subroutines that just don't seem to be properly used
>elsewhere and don't seem to be in the var list.

Variables that are local to the subroutine are not seen outside the
subroutine.  One outside can have the same name, but it is a different
variable.

Quote:
>I assume that the :extended keyword after a variable means that the variable
>is a double or other extended length variable.

"Extended" is longer than "double", it uses 10 bytes instead of 8, has
higher precision and wider range.

Quote:
>Would I be correct in assuming that the following is a coment:   (*some
>text*) (***) and that the comments can run to multiple lines in the first
>example?

Yes.


Tue, 18 Oct 2005 09:52:50 GMT  
 Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer

Quote:

> I'm converting a program that was written in some version of
> Pascal or Pascal like language.  The EXE of the program is a
> standalone program and has no explicit copyright notices or
> other stuff to indicate what compiler was used.  It runs in
> plain ol' PC DOS.  I have the source code which is why I'm
> asking these questions as there are strangeness in the source
> code. The questions that I have are:

... snip ...

Yes, Pascal is case insensitive.  Yes, (* ... *) enclose comments,
spreading over multiple lines.

However, DO NOT multi-post.  You put the same question on at least
two newsgroups independantly.  You can (within limits) cross-post,
i.e. select both groups as the destination for the same message,
as I have done here.  That means only one copy of this will be
promulgated, and most people (depending on newsreader smarts) will
not have to read it twice.

--

   Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
   <http://cbfalconer.home.att.net>  USE worldnet address!



Tue, 18 Oct 2005 15:56:22 GMT  
 Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer

Quote:

> I aplogize for the simpleness of the questions as I normally program in
> assemhly language and use VB as my second language.  I'll also note that
> while I can read C, I dislike ti strongly.

You've got already some answers. From the questions ("extended" mainly) I
gather that you use some Borland compiler or derivative.

If you got more questions, check this here:

http://www.freepascal.org/docs-html/ref/ref.html



Tue, 18 Oct 2005 16:18:34 GMT  
 Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer
Yes, I did the double posting as the two groups that I did post to are the
only active groups of the newsgroups that I have available.
I'll note that on this NG, the only post from yesterday when I posted are 3
replys from people that graciously answered my questions.  Most of the NGs
that I attend are doing several hundred a day.  I was just spreading my
chances of good answers so that I can continue the proccess of converting
the program to another language.
I'll note that most languages do, at least in their present designs, limit
the scope of a local variable to that subroutine.  For Assembly, all
variables are generally case sensitive and global in scope unless they are
pushed on the stack and retrieved in the subroutine.
Thanks for the help!

--
Bob May
Why is there an Ozone Hole at the South Pole but Not at the North Pole?
Somebody's been lying to you!



Wed, 19 Oct 2005 01:21:43 GMT  
 Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer
Nope, I don't have a Pascal compiler.  I am taking a Pascal or Pascal like
program and converting it to another language and just needed some of the
language pecularities questions answered.
The program in question is going from a DOS program which has little/no
error checking (it will bomb out with any of several error statements just
for the fun of it) and needs a text printer in order to run for output.  I'm
converting it to an interactive Windoz program that will natter at you when
calcualtions don't go right and allow you to correct your entries without
the program dying on the user.
I'm a failry clean writer of code and tend to want it to work without
failing - something that I don't see with a lot of code about, especially
windoz code.
--
Bob May
Why is there an Ozone Hole at the South Pole but Not at the North Pole?
Somebody's been lying to you!


Wed, 19 Oct 2005 01:27:39 GMT  
 Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer


Quote:
>Why is there an Ozone Hole at the South Pole but Not at the North Pole?

OT, but the North Pole does have ozone holes, but generally not as
much as the South Pole.   Temperature is a big factor and I think the
South Pole is colder than the North Pole (when the North hemisphere is
in winter, the Earth is near perihelion, when the South hemisphere is
in winter, the Earth is hear aphelion).

see

http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/topstory/20010917arctictemps.html

 http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/09/010919073151.htm
(essentially the same as above)

and

"It is now accepted that chlorine and bromine compounds in the
atmosphere cause the ozone depletion observed in the `ozone hole' over
Antarctica and over the North Pole."
http://www.atm.ch.cam.ac.uk/tour/part3.html



Thu, 20 Oct 2005 10:32:34 GMT  
 Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer

Quote:



>>Why is there an Ozone Hole at the South Pole but Not at the North Pole?

> OT, but the North Pole does have ozone holes, but generally not as
> much as the South Pole.   Temperature is a big factor and I think the
> South Pole is colder than the North Pole (when the North hemisphere is
> in winter, the Earth is near perihelion, when the South hemisphere is
> in winter, the Earth is hear aphelion).

Afaik, that is not the reason (for the temperature difference). The reason
is that the northpole is a sea with an icecap, while the southpole is a
landmass with an (much larger) icecap.


Thu, 20 Oct 2005 19:14:04 GMT  
 Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer
On Sun, 4 May 2003 11:14:04 +0000 (UTC), Marco van de Voort

Quote:

>Afaik, that is not the reason (for the temperature difference). The reason
>is that the northpole is a sea with an icecap, while the southpole is a
>landmass with an (much larger) icecap.

After I wrote that message I did a little research, and you are
absolutely right.  The primary reason is that the south pole is in the
middle of a continent, the north pole is in the sea.  There are more
extremes of temp inside a continent, water moderates the temp.

http://astro.uchicago.edu/cara/southpole.edu/qanda/qa_outdoors.html



Thu, 20 Oct 2005 22:22:38 GMT  
 Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer
I won't go too deeply into the signature question but the problem is tht the
South Pole gets colder than the North Pole so the process that destroys the
ozone become a lot more significant.  The environuts reason for the Ozone
Hole is not really valid.  The CFCs that are put into the atmosphere are not
the cause of the reduction of ozone but rather natural processes that exist.
I'll also note that over 80% of the CFCs that have been let loose have been
let loose in the Northern hemisphere rather than the Southern one.
Then again, the heavier than air CFCs all fall to the lower points and the
lowest point is the South Pole.  <VBG>!
All in all, the environuts have been lying to get their objectives - the
destruction of modern society - enacted.
FWIW, R12 works better than R134 and doesn't work its way out of a system as
fast and still carries as much chlorine out of the cooling system.
--
Bob May
Why is there an Ozone Hole at the South Pole but Not at the North Pole?
Somebody's been lying to you!


Fri, 21 Oct 2005 03:58:57 GMT  
 Some basic questions from a assembly language programmer


1 May 2003 18:48:30 :-

Quote:
>  I have the source code which is why
>I'm asking these questions as there are strangeness in the source code.

Assuming that you are sure that the source code which you have is
compilable, even if you cannot compile it yourself, I suggest that you
post salient excerpts.

From these, it may well be possible to say that it is NOT in certain
dialects of Pascal; and perhaps that it must be in a subset of
implementations that can be treated as a single dialect for most
purposes.  It may at least be possible to settle on a single appropriate
newsgroup.

The presence of (* ... } or { ... *) would tend to rule out Borland, for
example; and an indication that type real was six bytes would AIUI
strongly suggest Borland-compatible.  I don't know whether other Pascals
allow   \n   in a string to represent newline; but Borland does not.

Compiler directives or pragmas may well be distinctive.

The names of library routines, other than those used by Wirth or obvious
developments, could help identification; and those of units if used.

Also, if you can give the (original) date of the EXE, that would rule
out any compilers not then released.

If the code is compilable, it should be compiled, and compared (by
direct comparison, or by test of execution) with the EXE, if that has
been used.  If the EXE has been used, and is not the EXE of the PAS,
then a translation or upgrade of the PAS may not be entirely
satisfactory.

--

  <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> TP/BP/Delphi/&c., FAQqy topics & links;
  <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/clpb-faq.txt>   RAH Prins : c.l.p.b mFAQ;
  <URL:ftp://garbo.uwasa.fi/pc/link/tsfaqp.zip> Timo Salmi's Turbo Pascal FAQ.



Fri, 21 Oct 2005 20:01:10 GMT  
 
 [ 11 post ] 

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