Strong vs. weak-typing in OO design/languagges 
Author Message
 Strong vs. weak-typing in OO design/languagges

I'm looking for material dealing with the issues of strong typing versus
weak typing a they relate to object-oriented design and languages.  As an
example, C++ and Eiffel have strong typing and provide various object-oriented
features.  On the other hand, Smalltalk and Objective-C provide weak typing
(Objective-C strongly types everything but objects) and also provide object-
oriented features.  Just as a note, for this particular situation I would
require a language to have inheritance and encapsulation in order to be
considered object-oriented.

I would greatly appreciate any pointers that people could provide to such
material.  Please email me and I'll summarize to the net if there's enough
interest.

Brian R. Gilstrap                          Southwestern Bell Telephone
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Mon, 17 Aug 1992 13:59:00 GMT  
 Strong vs. weak-typing in OO design/languagges
Hi there, I am currently looking at the very interesting but curiously
anonymous area of languages that support representation independent data
structure facilities. The characteristic feature of such languages is that
they support algorithm specification that is independent of data structure
realization details.

The references I have found is listed below. A search through the Science
Citation Index on most of the referenced names resulted in NIL. Does anyone
know of any other work done in the area. Of particular interest is material
newer than the SETL paper (1981).

I will post a sumary of the answers I get.
----

Departement of Computer and Information Science, Linkoping University
S-581 83  Linkoping, Sweden
---

E. Schonberg, J. T. Schwartz, and M. Sharir, "An automatic technique for
selection of data representations in SETL programs", ACM Transactions on
Programming Languages and Systems, Vol. 3, No. 2, pp. 126-143, April 1981.

R. M. Balzer, "Dataless programming", Proceedings 1967 AFIPS Fall Joint
Computer Conference, Thompson Books, Washington, D.C., pp. 535-544., 1967.

M. E. D'Imperio, "Data structures and their representation in storage", Annual
Review on Automatic Programming, No. 5, pp 1-76, 1969.

J. Earley, "Toward an understanding of data structures", Communications of the
ACM, Vol. 14, No. 10, pp. 617-627, October 1971.

J. R. Low, "Automatic data structure selection: An example and an overview",
Communications of the ACM, Vol. 21, No. 15, pp. 376-385, May 1978.

G. H. Mealy, "Another look at data", Proceedings 1967 AFIPS Fall Joint
Computer Conference, Thompson Books, Washington, D.C., pp. 524-534, 1967.

M. Senko, E. Altman, M. Astrahan, and P. Fehder, "Data structures and
accessing data base systems", IBM Systems Journal, Vol. 12, pp. 30-93, 1973.



Thu, 17 Sep 1992 21:04:00 GMT  
 Strong vs. weak-typing in OO design/languagges

Quote:
>Hi there, I am currently looking at the very interesting but curiously
>anonymous area of languages that support representation independent data
>structure facilities.


Law of Nature : There is no data without representation.
[In Boston: No taxation without representation.]

What the area is about is: automatic selection of data structures based
on specification of meaning.  Stating the goal as "representation
independent data structures" is oxymoronic.  Note that the specification
of meaning necessarily has representation.
        Ric Holt



Thu, 17 Sep 1992 17:01:00 GMT  
 
 [ 4 post ] 

 Relevant Pages 

1. Flying With Python (Strong versus Weak Typing) [actually, Static vs Dynamic typing]

2. von Rossum on Strong vs. Weak Typing

3. Strong vs. Weak Typing

4. Strong/Weak typing

5. Strong types; weak minds

6. R5RS on static/dynamic and strong/weak typing

7. Flying With Python (Strong versus Weak Typing)

8. all strong disks outside the weak hallway were climbing beneath the hollow square

9. Weak/Strong Signals for a Latch

10. Senior College Lab-Strong/Weak Points of LISP

11. An Interesting View of "Strong" Vs. "Weak" Typing

12. An Interesting View of "Strong" Vs. "Weak" Typing

 

 
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