Origin of "dope vector" 
Author Message
 Origin of "dope vector"

I'm writing up a little paper on array implementation and
manipulation.  I use the term "dope vector" for the data
structure that holds lower and upper bounds and subscripting
multipliers for each dimension.  The oldest reference I
have for this particular term is Gries' 1971 book, where
the reference is:

... "For arrays this template is called a dope vector or
information vector. ...

The terms are underlined, but still it seems to be a term
in common use at that time.  Does anyone know where the
term was first coined?

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Mon, 06 Feb 1995 04:56:11 GMT  
 Origin of "dope vector"

On 19 Aug 92 20:56:11 GMT,

Rod>                                   The oldest reference I
Rod> have for this particular term is Gries' 1971 book, where
Rod> the reference is:

Rod> ... "For arrays this template is called a dope vector or
Rod> information vector. ...

I'm not sure of the exact first use, but I first encountered ``dope
vector'' in reading the PL/I reference manuals for the OS 360 in late
1969. Gries was at that time pretty IBM oriented so his use may have
derived from the same PL/I documentation. PL/I had already been around
for a while in 1969 so the terminology is prabably older.

Good luck in your search,
Ed

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Direct Interfaces Corporation
San Jose, Ca.



Tue, 07 Feb 1995 06:08:59 GMT  
 Origin of "dope vector"

 > On 19 Aug 92 20:56:11 GMT,

 > Rod>                                   The oldest reference I
 > Rod> have for this particular term is Gries' 1971 book, where
 > Rod> the reference is:
 >
 > I'm not sure of the exact first use, but I first encountered ``dope
 > vector'' in reading the PL/I reference manuals for the OS 360 in late
 > 1969. Gries was at that time pretty IBM oriented so his use may have
 > derived from the same PL/I documentation. PL/I had already been around
 > for a while in 1969 so the terminology is prabably older.
 >
Certainly.  In front of me I have K. Sattley and P. Z. Ingerman, The
Allocation of Storage for Arrays in Algol-60, University of Pennsylvania
Report, AFOSR-TN-60-1320, November 1960.  On page 3 they say:
        Stored along with the elements of an array will be a "dope vector"
        containing the information necessary to reference the array (the
        parameters of the storage-mapping function).
But I do not know whether *that* is the first use.
--
dik t. winter, cwi, kruislaan 413, 1098 sj  amsterdam, nederland
home: bovenover 215, 1025 jn  amsterdam, nederland



Thu, 09 Feb 1995 19:34:02 GMT  
 
 [ 3 post ] 

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