LOGO-L> What about a pink turtle? 
Author Message
 LOGO-L> What about a pink turtle?

http://www.*-*-*.com/ ,1284,35654,00.html
Why Girls Don't Compute by Kendra Mayfield
3:00 a.m. Apr. 20, 2000 PDT

 "Math is hard," a talking Barbie doll told generations of girls who grew up
thinking they should be afraid of math and science.

Sadly, some of the Barbie mentality continues. A new study claims the
current generation of girls lack technical skills and are being shut out
from opportunities to enter high-paying, technology-related jobs because the
educational system is keeping them from achieving equality.

Girls aren't afraid of technology, they're turned off by boring video games,
dull programming classes, and uninspiring career options, according to a new
report by the American Association of University Women Educational
Foundation (AAUW).

"They are not so much phobic, but are disenchanted," said Pamela Haage, the
AAUW's director of research.
<snip>
---

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Mon, 07 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 LOGO-L> What about a pink turtle?
Dale ==>

I can't agree with the article. In terms of numbers, women certainly have
equality in the IT operations at many high tech companies in the Dallas
area. I can't speak for salary equality.

As to a pink turtle, it has been my experience that girls really don't need
them. In the various K-12 groups I worked with, girls generally did better
than boys.

I agree that girls tend to be turned off by male-oriented applications.
However, those teachers or parents who limit a girl's options to video games
and outdated, dull programming really need to take the blinders off. There
is ever so much more available to challenge all ages, levels and types of
interest.

Regards...Jim

Quote:
----- Original Message -----


Sent: Thursday, April 20, 2000 10:03 AM
Subject: LOGO-L> What about a pink turtle?

> http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,35654,00.html
> Why Girls Don't Compute by Kendra Mayfield
> 3:00 a.m. Apr. 20, 2000 PDT

>  "Math is hard," a talking Barbie doll told generations of girls who grew
up
> thinking they should be afraid of math and science.

> Sadly, some of the Barbie mentality continues. A new study claims the
> current generation of girls lack technical skills and are being shut out
> from opportunities to enter high-paying, technology-related jobs because
the
> educational system is keeping them from achieving equality.

> Girls aren't afraid of technology, they're turned off by boring video
games,
> dull programming classes, and uninspiring career options, according to a
new
> report by the American Association of University Women Educational
> Foundation (AAUW).

> "They are not so much phobic, but are disenchanted," said Pamela Haage,
the
> AAUW's director of research.
> <snip>
> ---

> ---------------------------------------------------------------




---------------------------------------------------------------





Tue, 08 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 LOGO-L> What about a pink turtle?
George ==>

By comparison, for the IT Group at Texas Instruments, my last contract...

Lab techs...none, at least by that title
Customer Service...70% women
Testing...75% women
Secretaries...100% women ( the few "Administrative Assistants" that remain)
IT (programmers, systems analysts, etc.)...60% women
Mechanical Engineers...Few to none
Software Engineers...60% women
Electrical Engineers...40% women (for the few that remain)
Management...50% women
Chemists...none

These are, of course, merely guesses since I retired in February. However, I
can affirm similar percentages at Nortel Networks, MCI, NEC, Abbot Labs,
GTE, and other smaller companies in the Dallas area. I cannot attest to
other areas of the country. Interestingly, I can also attest to the fact
that there is a large population from Southeast Asia, a growing Latin
population, and a signifcant European population. I think it's fair to say
that the American-born population is barely if at all in the majority.

Regards...Jim

Quote:
----- Original Message -----


Sent: Friday, April 21, 2000 4:34 PM
Subject: Re: LOGO-L> What about a pink turtle?

> As far as interest goes I think it has more to do with how
> parents expose their children (daughters) than anything.

> As far as numbers go.

> At the large BioTech company I work at.

> Lab Techs 90% women,
> Customer service 50% women,
> Testers are 90% women,
> Secretaries 100% women,
> IT is 100% men,
> Mechanical Engineers are 100% men,
> Software Engineers are 90% men,
> Electrical Engineers are 100% men,
> Management is 90% men.
> Chemists are 90% men.





> >Subject: Re: LOGO-L> What about a pink turtle?
> >Date: Fri, 21 Apr 2000 13:30:07 -0500

> >Dale ==>

> >I can't agree with the article. In terms of numbers, women certainly have
> >equality in the IT operations at many high tech companies in the Dallas
> >area. I can't speak for salary equality.

> >As to a pink turtle, it has been my experience that girls really don't
need
> >them. In the various K-12 groups I worked with, girls generally did
better
> >than boys.

> >I agree that girls tend to be turned off by male-oriented applications.
> >However, those teachers or parents who limit a girl's options to video
> >games
> >and outdated, dull programming really need to take the blinders off.
There
> >is ever so much more available to challenge all ages, levels and types of
> >interest.

> >Regards...Jim

> >----- Original Message -----


> >Sent: Thursday, April 20, 2000 10:03 AM
> >Subject: LOGO-L> What about a pink turtle?

> > > http://www.wired.com/news/culture/0,1284,35654,00.html
> > > Why Girls Don't Compute by Kendra Mayfield
> > > 3:00 a.m. Apr. 20, 2000 PDT

> > >  "Math is hard," a talking Barbie doll told generations of girls who
> >grew
> >up
> > > thinking they should be afraid of math and science.

> > > Sadly, some of the Barbie mentality continues. A new study claims the
> > > current generation of girls lack technical skills and are being shut
out
> > > from opportunities to enter high-paying, technology-related jobs
because
> >the
> > > educational system is keeping them from achieving equality.

> > > Girls aren't afraid of technology, they're turned off by boring video
> >games,
> > > dull programming classes, and uninspiring career options, according to
a
> >new
> > > report by the American Association of University Women Educational
> > > Foundation (AAUW).

> > > "They are not so much phobic, but are disenchanted," said Pamela
Haage,
> >the
> > > AAUW's director of research.
> > > <snip>
> > > ---

> > > ---------------------------------------------------------------



> >---------------------------------------------------------------



> ________________________________________________________________________
> Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com

---------------------------------------------------------------





Tue, 08 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 LOGO-L> What about a pink turtle?
George ==>

In addition to parents, I think the area of the country makes a significant
difference. Certainly the area of the world plays a critical role in
opportunities for women.

Attitudes and life styles in New England where you live are quite different
than they are here in Texas. Both are very different from California, which
is different from Washington. In the Telecom Corridor that spans North
Dallas, Richardson, and Plano in North Texas, there is a rapidly growing
Southeast Asian population...Indian and Oriental. They're attracted to the
low cost of living and the high tech education and employment centers here.
Unemployment in the high tech industries here and in Austin is nonexistent.

Which boils down to...

Could it be that there are simply more opportunities here...especially for
women and minorities?

Food for thought...Jim

Quote:
----- Original Message -----


Sent: Friday, April 21, 2000 4:34 PM
Subject: Re: LOGO-L> What about a pink turtle?

> As far as interest goes I think it has more to do with how
> parents expose their children (daughters) than anything.

> As far as numbers go.

> At the large BioTech company I work at.

> Lab Techs 90% women,
> Customer service 50% women,
> Testers are 90% women,
> Secretaries 100% women,
> IT is 100% men,
> Mechanical Engineers are 100% men,
> Software Engineers are 90% men,
> Electrical Engineers are 100% men,
> Management is 90% men.
> Chemists are 90% men.

---------------------------------------------------------------





Wed, 09 Oct 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 4 post ] 

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