Constructivism 
Author Message
 Constructivism

This may be the wrong place to ask this question.  If so I wonder if
someone can point me in the right direction.

Anyway I ran across the following definition of constructivism in
education and I'm wondering what people think about its validity.  Is
this a fair description of what constructivists think?

     A key word to learn when trying to understand postmodern
     education is constructivism.  Constructivism is the main
     underlying learning theory in postmodern education. The basic
     idea is that all knowledge is invented or "constructed" in the
     minds of people. Knowledge is not discovered as modernists would
     claim. In other words, the ideas teachers teach and students
     learn do not correspond to "Reality," they are merely human
     constructions. Knowledge, ideas and language are created by
     people, not because they are "true," but rather because they are
     useful.

     Reality is a story. All reality exists, not objectively--out
     there--but in the mind of those who perceive it. Nobody's version
     of reality can claim to have more objective authority because all
     versions are merely human creations.

(The writer of this description is not sympathetic to constructivism.
The context is polemic but I'm fairly sure he wants to be fair).

--

And then [Clinton] turned to Hunter Thompson, of all people, and said
with wholehearted fervor, "We're going to put one hundred thousand new
police officers on the street."
I was up all night persuading Hunter that this was not a personal
threat.                                              -- P. J. O'Rourke



Wed, 11 Feb 2004 01:55:02 GMT  
 Constructivism
It doesn't sound like constructivsm as defined at the MIT Epistemology and
Learning lab. You should probably read some of their stuff. As i remember
it, it referred to external environments constructed by the kids. The
advantage of papertian constructions was it was the kids who built the
environments. Actually Constructionism as defined by papertian's is an
improvement on Constructionsim as defined by piaget. You have to remember
papert studied with piaget and has time to make refinements on his
theories. Constructionism as defined by piaget and constructism as defined
by papertians are quite different. This internal "constructism" you have
defined here sounds more like constructionism since it is internal rather
than external. Imho the definition you have below is bogus.
james
Quote:

> This may be the wrong place to ask this question.  If so I wonder if
> someone can point me in the right direction.

> Anyway I ran across the following definition of constructivism in
> education and I'm wondering what people think about its validity.  Is
> this a fair description of what constructivists think?

>      A key word to learn when trying to understand postmodern
>      education is constructivism.  Constructivism is the main
>      underlying learning theory in postmodern education. The basic
>      idea is that all knowledge is invented or "constructed" in the
>      minds of people. Knowledge is not discovered as modernists would
>      claim. In other words, the ideas teachers teach and students
>      learn do not correspond to "Reality," they are merely human
>      constructions. Knowledge, ideas and language are created by
>      people, not because they are "true," but rather because they are
>      useful.

>      Reality is a story. All reality exists, not objectively--out
>      there--but in the mind of those who perceive it. Nobody's version
>      of reality can claim to have more objective authority because all
>      versions are merely human creations.

> (The writer of this description is not sympathetic to constructivism.
> The context is polemic but I'm fairly sure he wants to be fair).

> --

> And then [Clinton] turned to Hunter Thompson, of all people, and said
> with wholehearted fervor, "We're going to put one hundred thousand new
> police officers on the street."
> I was up all night persuading Hunter that this was not a personal
> threat.                                              -- P. J. O'Rourke



Thu, 12 Feb 2004 01:33:47 GMT  
 Constructivism
The word constructivism should be substituted where it makes more sense.
sorry.
james
Quote:

> It doesn't sound like constructivsm as defined at the MIT Epistemology and
> Learning lab. You should probably read some of their stuff. As i remember
> it, it referred to external environments constructed by the kids. The
> advantage of papertian constructions was it was the kids who built the
> environments. Actually Constructionism as defined by papertian's is an
> improvement on Constructionsim as defined by piaget. You have to remember
> papert studied with piaget and has time to make refinements on his
> theories. Constructionism as defined by piaget and constructism as defined
> by papertians are quite different. This internal "constructism" you have
> defined here sounds more like constructionism since it is internal rather
> than external. Imho the definition you have below is bogus.
> james


> > This may be the wrong place to ask this question.  If so I wonder if
> > someone can point me in the right direction.

> > Anyway I ran across the following definition of constructivism in
> > education and I'm wondering what people think about its validity.  Is
> > this a fair description of what constructivists think?

> >      A key word to learn when trying to understand postmodern
> >      education is constructivism.  Constructivism is the main
> >      underlying learning theory in postmodern education. The basic
> >      idea is that all knowledge is invented or "constructed" in the
> >      minds of people. Knowledge is not discovered as modernists would
> >      claim. In other words, the ideas teachers teach and students
> >      learn do not correspond to "Reality," they are merely human
> >      constructions. Knowledge, ideas and language are created by
> >      people, not because they are "true," but rather because they are
> >      useful.

> >      Reality is a story. All reality exists, not objectively--out
> >      there--but in the mind of those who perceive it. Nobody's version
> >      of reality can claim to have more objective authority because all
> >      versions are merely human creations.

> > (The writer of this description is not sympathetic to constructivism.
> > The context is polemic but I'm fairly sure he wants to be fair).

> > --

> > And then [Clinton] turned to Hunter Thompson, of all people, and said
> > with wholehearted fervor, "We're going to put one hundred thousand new
> > police officers on the street."
> > I was up all night persuading Hunter that this was not a personal
> > threat.                                              -- P. J. O'Rourke



Fri, 13 Feb 2004 11:01:08 GMT  
 
 [ 3 post ] 

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