LOGO-L> RE: Origin of phrase "Hard Fun" 
Author Message
 LOGO-L> RE: Origin of phrase "Hard Fun"

It is quoted in Negroponte's Being Digital:
When the Media Lab premiered its LEGO/Logo work in 1989, kids, kindergarten
through sixth grade from the Hennigan School, demonstrated their projects
before a full force of LEGO executives, academics, and the press. A zealous
anchorwoman from one of the national TV networks, camera lights ablazing,
cornered one child and asked him if this was not just all fun and games. She
pressed this eight-year-old for a typical, "cute", sound-bite reply. The
child was obviously shaken. Finally, after her third repetition of the
question and after considerable heat from the lights, this sweaty-faced,
exasperated child plaintively looked into the camera and said, "yes, this is
fun, but it's hard fun."
Page 196
Cheers

Jenny Little
Hard Fun
Technology & Learning Consultancy
220/67 Spencer St
Melbourne 3000
Phone/Fax:      +61 39620 0953
Mobile:         0417 536 443

Quote:
-----Original Message-----


Sent: Saturday, January 08, 2000 6:11 AM

Subject: LOGO-L> Origin of phrase "Hard Fun"

I just read (a somewhat interesting) article by Elliot Soloway et. al.
called "K-12 and the Internet" in the January Communications of the ACM.


"Alan Kay observes that learning is 'hard fun.'"

Now I don't doubt that Alan observed that but I'm curious about the origin
of the phrase. My not-so-reliable memory is that Seymour Papert said he
heard it from a child learning LOGO.

Anyone know more about this? It sure is a nice phrase.

Best,

-ken kahn (www.toontalk.com)
---------------------------------------------------------------



---------------------------------------------------------------






Wed, 26 Jun 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 LOGO-L> RE: Origin of phrase "Hard Fun"

Jenny Little schrieb:

Quote:
> It is quoted in Negroponte's Being Digital:
> When the Media Lab premiered its LEGO/Logo work in 1989, kids, kindergarten
> through sixth grade from the Hennigan School, demonstrated their projects
> before a full force of LEGO executives, academics, and the press. A zealous
> anchorwoman from one of the national TV networks, camera lights ablazing,
> cornered one child and asked him if this was not just all fun and games. She
> pressed this eight-year-old for a typical, "cute", sound-bite reply. The
> child was obviously shaken. Finally, after her third repetition of the
> question and after considerable heat from the lights, this sweaty-faced,
> exasperated child plaintively looked into the camera and said, "yes, this is
> fun, but it's hard fun."
> Page 196
> Cheers

> Jenny Little
> Hard Fun
> Technology & Learning Consultancy
> 220/67 Spencer St
> Melbourne 3000
> Phone/Fax:      +61 39620 0953
> Mobile:         0417 536 443

> -----Original Message-----


> Sent: Saturday, January 08, 2000 6:11 AM

> Subject: LOGO-L> Origin of phrase "Hard Fun"

> I just read (a somewhat interesting) article by Elliot Soloway et. al.
> called "K-12 and the Internet" in the January Communications of the ACM.


> "Alan Kay observes that learning is 'hard fun.'"

> Now I don't doubt that Alan observed that but I'm curious about the origin
> of the phrase. My not-so-reliable memory is that Seymour Papert said he
> heard it from a child learning LOGO.

> Anyone know more about this? It sure is a nice phrase.

> Best,

> -ken kahn (www.toontalk.com)
> ---------------------------------------------------------------



> ---------------------------------------------------------------






Tue, 02 Jul 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 2 post ] 

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