numerical math with functional languages? 
Author Message
 numerical math with functional languages?

I know close to nothing about functional languages.  Are they suited to
numerical math?  If so, which language has the most extensive set of
numerical routines stored in an ftp or http site?  By numerical math I am
thinking of things like random number generation (uniform, normal),
nonlinear optimization (e.g. BFGS quasi-Newton with numerical
derivatives), matrix inversion (in doing maximum likelihood estimation,
after using BFGS, need to do sqrt(diagonal(invert(-hessian))), statistical
stuff like cumulative density functions and inverse cumulative density
functions for various distributions.

Is there a functional language equivalent to netlib (which mostly has
fortran and some C and C++ code)?

If one wants to use other people's code, it helps to use a popular
language.  Which functional language would be most popular for numerical
math?

Thanks for any help.

Bill Simpson



Sat, 30 Jan 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 numerical math with functional languages?


Quote:

>Subject: numerical math with functional languages?

>Date: Tue, 13 Aug 1996 09:20:01 -0500
>I know close to nothing about functional languages.  Are they suited to
>numerical math?  If so, which language has the most extensive set of
>numerical routines stored in an ftp or http site?  By numerical math I am
>thinking of things like random number generation (uniform, normal),
>nonlinear optimization (e.g. BFGS quasi-Newton with numerical
>derivatives), matrix inversion (in doing maximum likelihood estimation,
>after using BFGS, need to do sqrt(diagonal(invert(-hessian))), statistical
>stuff like cumulative density functions and inverse cumulative density
>functions for various distributions.

Whew! This is a lot of question, and I'm sure you're going to get a lot of
answer. Let me try.

First, yes, definitely, runctional languages are well suited to any kind
of math. APL has all sorts of built-in math capabilities, mostly linear
algebra, as far as I know. Its performance is not high, due to its being
an interpreted rather than compiled language. Most functional languages
lend themselves well to the expression of numerical programs. I've had
numerous comments from mathematicians about how easy it is to program
such stuff in Sisal. We've done lots of math and phycics related work
in it, although more whole applications than libraries. It started out
as a parallel language, but we soon found out that it's good for quickly
coding up efficient, readable, sequential code, as well. We've done
numerous applications, a lot of FFT work, a parallel random number
generator, and somebody did a Gaussian Elimination system solver, but
I don't know about the other stuff you mention. This is certainly the
right place to ask about it.

Rather than give you a whole pitch for Sisal, here, why don't you check
out the Sisal web pages, at http://www.llnl.gov/sisal and maybe the
on-line tutorial that's anchored there? You'll soon see whether this
language is what you want.

Quote:
>Is there a functional language equivalent to netlib (which mostly has
>FORTRAN and some C and C++ code)?

I don't know netlib, but Sisal does allow interfacing Sisal with C
and Fortran. This is a sensible way to parallelize existing codes, namely
pick the parts where the parallelism exists, and recode them, leaving
the other stuff in the original language. It's also a good way to use
sequential solvers and kernels in parallel programs, by calling them
in parallel.

Quote:
>If one wants to use other people's code, it helps to use a popular
>language.  Which functional language would be most popular for numerical
>math?

Well, I've already said what my favorite is, and we've published several
papers with mathematicians and other scientific types. Check it out,
and see for yourself.

Quote:
>Thanks for any help.

You're welcome.

Quote:
>Bill Simpson

Tom DeBoni

PS I forgot to mention, Sisal's free, it runs under Unix, and you can
get and install it pretty easily on most any uniprocessor or shared-
memory multiprocessor system. Pointers to the ftp site are in the web
pages.



Sat, 30 Jan 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 numerical math with functional languages?


Quote:
>I know close to nothing about functional languages.  Are they suited to
>numerical math?  If so, which language has the most extensive set of

YES.

Quote:
>numerical routines stored in an ftp or http site?  By numerical math I am
>thinking of things like random number generation (uniform, normal),
>nonlinear optimization (e.g. BFGS quasi-Newton with numerical
>derivatives), matrix inversion (in doing maximum likelihood estimation,

Try either APL or J. Some versions are available (with limited
docs, to encourage you to blow $$ on Real Product) via ftp from
watserv1.uwaterloo.ca.  J is an APL follow-on. ASCII-based, kept
many good ideas from APL, discarded bad ones (usually), added some
very excellent and powerful new ideas.

Bob

ps: Tom's comments about APL interpretive performance are somewhat
true, depending on your specific application. Some perform quite well
against compiled languages. Others do not. I'm finishing a parallel
APL compiler now that addresses some of those performance problems.
Bob



Sat, 30 Jan 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 3 post ] 

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