Workshop on Interface Definition Languages (reminder) 
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 Workshop on Interface Definition Languages (reminder)

[Abstracts due Sept. 17.]

               WORKSHOP ON INTERFACE DEFINITION LANGUAGES

                    Sponsored by ACM SIGPLAN

                         Portland, Oregon    
                         20 January 1994    
                    (Immediately after POPL)

An interface is the boundary between two or more system components.
These components may be small program units such as Ada packages,
Modula-3 modules, Standard ML structures, or C++ classes. They may be
complex system layers such as the kernel and user layers of an
operating system, or the seven layers of the ISO/OSI internet
protocol.  We have learned from years of experience that with properly
defined interfaces it is possible to build large, complex systems in
terms of smaller, well-understood pieces.  Well-defined interfaces
also increase the ability to exploit heterogeneity since an interface
can serve as a firewall behind which radically different
implementations can hide.  At the same time, we have also learned that
often the hardest part in designing a system is identifying clean
interfaces and defining them precisely.  An ill-defined or
underspecified interface may lead to system flaws that are costly to
find and fix, especially when discovered late in the overall system
development process.

The purpose of this workshop is to focus attention on interfaces:
languages for defining them, tools for analyzing them, and system
infrastructure for supporting them.  We are interested in a broad range
of issues that address questions like:

    o What information should interface definitions contain?
        - type, functionality, side-effects, resource usage, reliability

    o What compatibility rules can we use to plug components together safely?
        - data type conversion protocols, partial matching, runtime negotiation

    o What languages can we use to define interfaces?
        - module interconnection languages, formal specification languages,
          software architecture languages

    o What automatic support can we build based on information in
      interface definitions?
        - stub generators, global optimizers, interface libraries,
          implementation-interface binders

    o What kinds of properties can we prove about a system and its components
      from interface definitions?
        - safety, liveness, real-time, performance

The goal of this one-day workshop is to determine what the state of
the art is on the subject of interfaces and interface definition
languages.  We believe this topic will be of growing interest and see
this workshop as the seed for future discussions.

We are interested in both theoretical and practical approaches to
these issues.  To participate in this workshop, please send six (6) copies
of an extended abstract (5--10 double-sided pages) by 17 September 1993 to:

        Jeannette M. Wing
        School of Computer Science
        Carnegie Mellon University
        5000 Forbes Avenue
        Pittsburgh, PA  15213-3890

Your abstract should clearly state what your specific interest is in
interfaces and interface definition languages.  We welcome papers
that investigate semantic issues, describe new language features, or
propose ways to express the interconnection among system components.
We also welcome papers that describe novel implementations that have
been built to define, analyze, or support interfaces.

We plan to organize the workshop as a series of short presentations
with ample time allotted for group discussions.  We will distribute a
proceedings containing the accepted abstracts.  We are negotiating with
SIGPLAN to publish the proceedings as a special issue of SIGPLAN Notices.

DATES

        Extended abstracts due          17 September 1993
        Acceptance notification          5 November 1993
        Final version of papers due      3 December 1993
        Workshop                        20 January 1994

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

        Jeannette Wing, Carnegie Mellon, Chair
        David Lamb, Queen's University
        Paul Leach, Microsoft
        David MacQueen, AT\&T Bell Labs.
        Greg Nelson, DEC/SRC
        Dan Yellin, IBM T.J. Watson Labs.



Sat, 17 Feb 1996 23:16:46 GMT  
 
 [ 1 post ] 

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