Was Hypercard the first "Visual Forth"? 
Author Message
 Was Hypercard the first "Visual Forth"?

While reading the media hype about Visual Basic and delphi and others, I
had the feeling that there was something like that already there many
years ago, and now I remember: it was the Hypercard system for the Mac.
And IIRC Hypercard had a Forth-like language underneath. I never had a
Mac, so I wonder: can anyone tell me more facts about it?

--
Bernd Paysan
"Late answers are wrong answers!"
http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~paysan/



Mon, 02 Aug 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 Was Hypercard the first "Visual Forth"?

Quote:

> While reading the media hype about Visual Basic and Delphi and others, I
> had the feeling that there was something like that already there many
> years ago, and now I remember: it was the Hypercard system for the Mac.
> And IIRC Hypercard had a Forth-like language underneath. I never had a
> Mac, so I wonder: can anyone tell me more facts about it?

HyperCard is still around and semi-actively supported by Apple.
Popular among teachers and shareware authors as a very low-cost
multi-media tool. Early versions were very slow and displayed b/w
only; more recent versions are much faster (development environment
includes a compiler) and support color.

The programming language (HyperTalk) is not at all Forth-like
though. It's loosely C/Pascal-ish with a very tolerant parser
in the sense that you can put a lot of connective words into
the code to make it more English-like and they are essentially
ignored. Typical HyperTalk statement:

     go to first card of second background of stack "MyStack"

The best book I've seen on HyperCard for beginners is Danny
Goodman's "HyperCard Developers' Guide." I'm not sure it's still
in print but zillions of copies were sold and it should be easy
to find one if you are curious.

Ray Duncan



Sat, 07 Aug 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 Was Hypercard the first "Visual Forth"?

| HyperCard is still around and semi-actively supported by Apple.
| Popular among teachers and shareware authors as a very low-cost
| multi-media tool. Early versions were very slow and displayed b/w
| only; more recent versions are much faster (development environment
| includes a compiler) and support color.
|
| The programming language (HyperTalk) is not at all Forth-like
| though. It's loosely C/Pascal-ish with a very tolerant parser
| in the sense that you can put a lot of connective words into
| the code to make it more English-like and they are essentially
| ignored. Typical HyperTalk statement:
|
|      go to first card of second background of stack "MyStack"
|

...which also looks a lot like AppleScript.  Fact of the matter is,
HyperTalk is an OSA (Open Scripting Architecture) compliant language,
essentially meaning that anything you can do with AppleScript, you can
also do in HyperTalk.  Within Hypercard stacks, you can mix and match
scripts written in both languages.

Cheers,
Jayfar

 Jay Farrell                            Jayfar's Original Virtual Macintosh

 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA        <URL:http://www.netaxs.com/~jayfar/>



Sun, 08 Aug 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 Was Hypercard the first "Visual Forth"?


: > While reading the media hype about Visual Basic and Delphi and others, I
: > had the feeling that there was something like that already there many
: > years ago, and now I remember: it was the Hypercard system for the Mac.
: > And IIRC Hypercard had a Forth-like language underneath. I never had a
: > Mac, so I wonder: can anyone tell me more facts about it?

: HyperCard is still around and semi-actively supported by Apple.
: Popular among teachers and shareware authors as a very low-cost
: multi-media tool. Early versions were very slow and displayed b/w
: only; more recent versions are much faster (development environment
: includes a compiler) and support color.

: The programming language (HyperTalk) is not at all Forth-like
: though. It's loosely C/Pascal-ish with a very tolerant parser
: in the sense that you can put a lot of connective words into
: the code to make it more English-like and they are essentially
: ignored. Typical HyperTalk statement:

:      go to first card of second background of stack "MyStack"

: The best book I've seen on HyperCard for beginners is Danny
: Goodman's "HyperCard Developers' Guide." I'm not sure it's still
: in print but zillions of copies were sold and it should be easy
: to find one if you are curious.

: Ray Duncan

I have the above-mentioned book and would like to get rid of it.  First

also have another book by Goodman which is either more or less advanced
on the same subject; I forget the title.  Both available for the price
of shipping!

--

Q. How do you tell when a pineapple is ready to eat?
A. It picks up its knife and fork.



Mon, 09 Aug 1999 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 4 post ] 

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