Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ] 
Author Message
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]


Quote:

> | Why is Manson still alive?

> Because in 1972, the California Supreme Court declared that the death
> penalty was a cruel and unusual punishment and thus in violation of
> the state constitution.  107 inmates were taken off death row and
> resentenced.  Manson was among them.

> California has since reinstated the death penalty.

> JEH - who thinks people like you are thousands of times more dangerous
>       than Manson ever was.

You mean Marilyn Manson?

--
Marco Antoniotti ===========================================
PARADES, Via San Pantaleo 66, I-00186 Rome, ITALY
tel. +39 - 06 68 10 03 17, fax. +39 - 06 68 80 79 26
http://www.*-*-*.com/ ~marcoxa



Sat, 02 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]

Quote:

>> | Why is Manson still alive?
>You mean Marilyn Manson?

No: Charles Manson. Marilyn Manson is completely harmless in comparison.

        Bart.



Sat, 02 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]

Quote:


> >> | Why is Manson still alive?

> >You mean Marilyn Manson?

> No: Charles Manson. Marilyn Manson is completely harmless in comparison.

Are you sure? :)

Cheers

--
Marco Antoniotti ===========================================
PARADES, Via San Pantaleo 66, I-00186 Rome, ITALY
tel. +39 - 06 68 10 03 17, fax. +39 - 06 68 80 79 26
http://www.parades.rm.cnr.it/~marcoxa



Sat, 02 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]

Quote:



> > >> | Why is Manson still alive?

> > >You mean Marilyn Manson?

> > No: Charles Manson. Marilyn Manson is completely harmless in comparison.

> Are you sure? :)

Yes.  SHIRLEY Manson, now, could be real trouble.

--
The strongest human instinct is to impart information, the
second is to resist it. --Kenneth Grahame



Sat, 02 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]

Quote:
Jerry Avins  writes:

> > Many years ago there was a CP/M program called Kamas, which started life as
> > a BBS program, and evolved into an outline program for writing. It was a
> > variant of STOIC, and its True was a 1 in the least-significant bit, i.e.
> > Odd numbers were true and Even numbers were false.

> > Walter Rottenkolber
> > -----------------------------------------------------------

> Hmmm... Two truths make a flasehood. At least, two falsehoods don't make
> a truth. (I assume addition here.)

> Jerry
> --

Reminds me of a linguistics convention where a speaker was discussing
the fact that in some languages (such as English) the double negative
converts to positive (i.e. false false = true); whereas others use
it to reinforce negativity (as in French, ne ... pas). He then claimed
there was no language in which the double positive implied negativity--
to which someone in the audience replied

        "Yeah, yeah."

--
Julian V. Noble

"Elegance is for tailors!"    -- Ludwig Boltzmann



Sun, 03 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]
Oh, I *love* it.

Quote:

> Jerry Avins  writes:

> > > Many years ago there was a CP/M program called Kamas, which started life as
> > > a BBS program, and evolved into an outline program for writing. It was a
> > > variant of STOIC, and its True was a 1 in the least-significant bit, i.e.
> > > Odd numbers were true and Even numbers were false.

> > > Walter Rottenkolber
> > > -----------------------------------------------------------

> > Hmmm... Two truths make a flasehood. At least, two falsehoods don't make
> > a truth. (I assume addition here.)

> > Jerry
> > --

> Reminds me of a linguistics convention where a speaker was discussing
> the fact that in some languages (such as English) the double negative
> converts to positive (i.e. false false = true); whereas others use
> it to reinforce negativity (as in French, ne ... pas). He then claimed
> there was no language in which the double positive implied negativity--
> to which someone in the audience replied

>         "Yeah, yeah."

> --
> Julian V. Noble

> "Elegance is for tailors!"      -- Ludwig Boltzmann

--
The strongest human instinct is to impart information, the
second is to resist it. --Kenneth Grahame


Sun, 03 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]

Quote:
> Reminds me of a linguistics convention where a speaker was discussing
> the fact that in some languages (such as English) the double negative
> converts to positive (i.e. false false = true); whereas others use
> it to reinforce negativity (as in French, ne ... pas). He then claimed
> there was no language in which the double positive implied negativity--
> to which someone in the audience replied
> "Yeah, yeah."

I heard this cited as "yeah, right", which seems to be a stronger version.

                                                                      Philip

--
DISARRAY ('dis-u-Rae) n. Data structure that looks like an array, but isn't.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

+44 (0)1223 49 4639                 | Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton
+44 (0)1223 49 4468 (fax)           | Cambridgeshire CB10 1SD,  GREAT BRITAIN
PGP fingerprint: E1 03 BF 80 94 61 B6 FC  50 3D 1F 64 40 75 FB 53



Sun, 03 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]

Quote:
Philip Lijnzaad  writes:

> > Reminds me of a linguistics convention where a speaker was discussing
> > the fact that in some languages (such as English) the double negative
> > converts to positive (i.e. false false = true); whereas others use
> > it to reinforce negativity (as in French, ne ... pas). He then claimed
> > there was no language in which the double positive implied negativity--
> > to which someone in the audience replied

> > "Yeah, yeah."

> I heard this cited as "yeah, right", which seems to be a stronger version.

>                                                                       Philip

In US English--admittedly not exactly the same as the Queen's English--
"Yeah, yeah" is far more dismissive and negative in tone than "Yeah,
right." In fact the latter is a most unlikely allocution on this side
of the pond.

--
Julian V. Noble

"Elegance is for tailors!"    -- Ludwig Boltzmann



Mon, 04 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]
You posted a longer version of that in this newsgroup a few years ago.  It's
been one of my favorite jokes to tell ever since.  But your original post
said that you overheard this conversation at the the school cafe from a
group of lunching linguistic people.

I've always wondered if it really occurred spontaneously.  I guess it
didn't.  Too bad.  But it's still a great story.

Barry


Quote:
> Reminds me of a linguistics convention where a speaker was discussing
> the fact that in some languages (such as English) the double negative
> converts to positive (i.e. false false = true); whereas others use
> it to reinforce negativity (as in French, ne ... pas). He then claimed
> there was no language in which the double positive implied negativity--
> to which someone in the audience replied

> "Yeah, yeah."

> --
> Julian V. Noble

> "Elegance is for tailors!" -- Ludwig Boltzmann



Mon, 04 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]

Quote:
"Barry"  writes:
> You posted a longer version of that in this newsgroup a few years ago.  It's
> been one of my favorite jokes to tell ever since.  But your original post
> said that you overheard this conversation at the the school cafe from a
> group of lunching linguistic people.

> I've always wondered if it really occurred spontaneously.  I guess it
> didn't.  Too bad.  But it's still a great story.

> Barry

My recollection is that the story was told by lunching linguists.

As for the reduced length, one learns terseness with age. After all,
there is less time to waste, n'est ce pas?

And re: having posted it before, that's another symptom of aging.
We forget what stories we have told to whom.

Cheers.

--
Julian V. Noble

"Elegance is for tailors!"    -- Ludwig Boltzmann



Mon, 04 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]

Quote:

(snip)

> I've always wondered if it really occurred spontaneously.  I guess it
> didn't.  Too bad.  But it's still a great story.

> Barry

I first read an account of this in no less a journal than Science, in
their News and Comment section.  The author used the anecdote to illustrate
that the person being profiled (who uttered the response from the back of the
room during a conference paper presentation) was a) Very bright b) Something
of a wise ass and therefore c) not very well liked by a number of his
colleagues.

Quote:

> > Reminds me of a linguistics convention where a speaker was discussing
> > the fact that in some languages (such as English) the double negative
> > converts to positive (i.e. false false = true); whereas others use
> > it to reinforce negativity (as in French, ne ... pas). He then claimed
> > there was no language in which the double positive implied negativity--
> > to which someone in the audience replied

> > "Yeah, yeah."

Note to non-Americans: voice tone is very important in delivering this.
  -LenZ-
Quote:

> > --
> > Julian V. Noble

> > "Elegance is for tailors!" -- Ludwig Boltzmann



Mon, 04 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]

[...]

Quote:
>In US English--admittedly not exactly the same as the Queen's English--
>"Yeah, yeah" is far more dismissive and negative in tone than "Yeah,
>right." In fact the latter is a most unlikely allocution on this side
>of the pond.

Yeah, right.

;-)

Regards,

                          -=Dave
Just my (10-010) cents
I can barely speak for myself, so I certainly can't speak for B-Tree.
Change is inevitable.  Progress is not.



Mon, 04 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Death penalty for LISP ? [ was: Re: Is LISP dying? ]


Quote:

> > > I think is plain that diameter was rounded up as
> > >  9.7 * PI = 30.46 ; 9.5 * PI = 29.8  so all matches

> We often over-rate ourselves. The ancients were not stupid.

> Solomon was no dummy. Although the science of the day, including
> mathematics, was not advanced, the technology used to build the
> temple, and this cast basin in particular, was astounding. The
> Solomonic temple represents one of the greatest architectural
> and technical works of the ancient world.

Either Solomon's temple never existed or the was it exaggerated.

It was 90 ft long, 30 ft wide, and 45 ft high (1 Ki 6:2)

About twice the cubic footage of an average 2 story house.

For a small structure It took 183,300 men 7 years to build it. (1 Kings
5:13-16)(1 Kings 6:38)

Into it supposedly went 9,200,000 Ibs of Gold and 92,000,000 Ibs of
Silver. (1 Chron 22:14)

And Archaeologists can't find it anywhere...

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Share what you know. Learn what you don't.



Mon, 04 Feb 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
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