Harmonics in fft transformed data 
Author Message
 Harmonics in fft transformed data

Hi all,

With the fft routine from motorola bbs, I'm able to generate 256
frequency domain data from 256 time domain data. My question is from
the 256 transformed data, how can i know which is the fundamental
frequency components, let say f and its harmonics 2*f, 3*f, 4*f and so
on?
Please advise me on this.

Albert



Tue, 05 Apr 2005 19:29:52 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data

Quote:

> With the fft routine from motorola bbs, I'm able to generate 256
> frequency domain data from 256 time domain data.

David, this would be a breaktrough in physics and a revolution
in telecoms :-) My guess is the top 128 "harmonics" in the sequence
are redundant (copies), or the 256 outputs are representing 128
frequency and phase components (maybe interleaved). The two lowest
components might be something special (DC component, Nyquist comp
etc.)

Quote:
> My question is from
> the 256 transformed data, how can i know which is the fundamental
> frequency components, let say f and its harmonics 2*f, 3*f, 4*f and so
> on?

Read the code, or input a sampled square wave. I'm sure you know
what to expect.

-marcel



Tue, 05 Apr 2005 20:45:37 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data

Quote:

> Hi all,

> With the fft routine from motorola bbs, I'm able to generate 256
> frequency domain data from 256 time domain data. My question is from
> the 256 transformed data, how can i know which is the fundamental
> frequency components, let say f and its harmonics 2*f, 3*f, 4*f and so
> on?
> Please advise me on this.

> Albert

I answered in another newsgroup. When you post to several groups, cross post a single message. That way, 1) when one reads it in one group, it will be marked old in the others and 2) replies in any group will appear in all.

Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.



Tue, 05 Apr 2005 23:35:21 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data
Thanks Marcel,

I heard from a friend that and have a question:
the 1st sample in the fft transformed data is the 'fs/256'th sample in
frequency domain. The 2nd is '2fs/256'th sample and so on. Since only
256 samples will be produced with the fft routine, does it mean that i
can't find the harmonics like 2nd harmonics(2*fs), 3rd
harmonics(3*fs), 4th harmonics (4*fs) and so on?

Also, I hope that you can clarify for me one thing. Sometimes, in fft,
they refer to power spectra which involves square root of absolute
values. Is this the magnitude we're interested in frequency domain?

Thanks...

Quote:


> > With the fft routine from motorola bbs, I'm able to generate 256
> > frequency domain data from 256 time domain data.

> David, this would be a breaktrough in physics and a revolution
> in telecoms :-) My guess is the top 128 "harmonics" in the sequence
> are redundant (copies), or the 256 outputs are representing 128
> frequency and phase components (maybe interleaved). The two lowest
> components might be something special (DC component, Nyquist comp
> etc.)

> > My question is from
> > the 256 transformed data, how can i know which is the fundamental
> > frequency components, let say f and its harmonics 2*f, 3*f, 4*f and so
> > on?

> Read the code, or input a sampled square wave. I'm sure you know
> what to expect.

> -marcel



Wed, 06 Apr 2005 06:25:46 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data

Quote:


> > With the fft routine from motorola bbs, I'm able to generate 256
> > frequency domain data from 256 time domain data.

> David, this would be a breaktrough in physics and a revolution
> in telecoms :-)
> [...]

David,

You may want to look at the ordering scheme for
numerical FFTs presented in the book "Numerical
Recipes" by Press, et al. They state that the
ordering scheme that they use is the practical
standard. In their scheme, the first element in
the array is the real part of the zero frequency
component (f=0), the next element is the imaginary part
for f=0, the next pair corresponds to the real
and imaginary parts of f = 1/(2N dt) and so on
until midway through the data set. Then the next
point is for f= -1/(2 dt) and increases back towards
zero.

Also, note that your fft does not have to be symmetric
if your original time domain data was complex. It's a
rather special case, but I believe you can indeed have
256 distinct complex points in the fft for 256 *complex*
time series data.

Krishna



Wed, 06 Apr 2005 08:14:02 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data
I hope that you know about samples signals to operate on them. Valid
sampling implies that there are no significant frequency components in
the sampled signal that equal or exceed half the sampling frequency.
Certainly, the reconstructed signal will contain none. The sampling
frequency has another significance. As your friend told you, the
sampling frequency, together with the number of samples you process,
determine the resolution of the result in Hz.

Some numbers may make this clear. Sample at 10240 Hz, a number suitable
for voice. (First filter the signal to limit its upper frequency to less
than 5120 Hz.) 256 samples are 1/40 second's worth. There will be 128
sine coefficients and as many cosine coefficients produced by the FFT.
Each pair is spaced 10240 Hz/256, or 40 Hz from it neighbors. The 1/40
sec. and 40 Hz. are what they seem: reciprocals. If you want 1 Hz
resolution, you must use a full second's worth of data. However many
samples you transform, the highest frequency that can be represented is
Fs/2, in this case, 5120 Hz. If there were a 100 Hz signal, its 51st
harmonic could be represented.

Look in http://www.dspguru.com for links to tutorials and books that you
might find useful.

Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

Quote:

> Thanks Jerry,

> I heard from a friend the following and i also have a question about
> it:

> the 1st sample in the fft transformed data is the 'fs/256'th sample in
> frequency domain. The 2nd is '2fs/256'th sample and so on. Since only
> 256 samples will be produced with the fft routine, does it mean that i
> can't find the harmonics like 2nd harmonics(2*fs), 3rd
> harmonics(3*fs), 4th harmonics (4*fs) and so on?

> Also, I hope that you can clarify for me one thing. Sometimes, in fft,
> they refer to power spectra which involves square root of absolute
> values. Is this the magnitude we're interested in frequency domain?

> Thanks...



> > > Hi all,

> > > With the fft routine from motorola bbs, I'm able to generate 256
> > > frequency domain data from 256 time domain data. My question is from
> > > the 256 transformed data, how can i know which is the fundamental
> > > frequency components, let say f and its harmonics 2*f, 3*f, 4*f and so
> > > on?
> > > Please advise me on this.

> > > Albert

> > You can guess, but you can't know from the data alone. Suppose there are prominent peaks at 100, 150, and 200 Hz. You can guess that they are the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th harmonics of a 50 Hz fundamental which you don't see. They could also be the 4th, 6th, and 8th harmonics of
> > 25 Hz, generated by a process that makes only even harmonics, such as absolute value or full-wave rectification. Suppose again that there is a weak component at 175 Hz. Does that force you to halve your estimate of the fundamental, or might it be unrelated to the other
> > components? Are the other components really related? You need to know or assume something or about the signal in order to answer those questions.

> > Jerry



Wed, 06 Apr 2005 09:32:41 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data


Quote:

> You may want to look at the ordering scheme for
> numerical FFTs presented in the book "Numerical
> Recipes" by Press, et al. They state that the
> ordering scheme that they use is the practical
> standard. In their scheme, the first element in
> the array is the real part of the zero frequency
> component (f=0), the next element is the imaginary part
> for f=0, the next pair corresponds to the real
> and imaginary parts of f = 1/(2N dt) and so on
> until midway through the data set. Then the next
> point is for f= -1/(2 dt) and increases back towards
> zero.

    I don't think you can make this assumption.  I've seen implementations
which put the real parts in the lower half and the imaginary parts in the
upper half.  I've seen implementations which only return the real part and
the upper half is a duplicate of the lower half (or don't generate it at
all).  I don't think there really is a standard.

Quote:
> Also, note that your fft does not have to be symmetric
> if your original time domain data was complex. It's a
> rather special case, but I believe you can indeed have
> 256 distinct complex points in the fft for 256 *complex*
> time series data.

    I don't think I've seen that variation.

--

-Gary Chanson (MVP for Windows SDK)
-Software Consultant (Embedded systems and Real Time Controls)

-War is the last resort of the incompetent.



Wed, 06 Apr 2005 13:03:16 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data
Newsgroups: comp.lang.forth
Subject: Re: Harmonics in fft transformed data
Summary:
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Sender:
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Organization: Internet Access Eindhoven
Keywords:
Cc:

Quote:
Krishna writes:
> [..] but I believe you can indeed have 256 distinct complex
> points in the fft for 256 *complex*time series data.

There exists a nice packing scheme (see e.g. NRC) where you pack 512
timepoints of a real signal as 256 complex samples of an artificial complex
signal. If you input these into a standard FFT and unpack the complex
frequency data properly, you will get 256 frequencies of the original 512
point real sequence. This is the optimal way to do it when the input points
are real (grabbed from an ADC or such).

The original poster seems to be confused with respect to the concepts of
"sample frequency" and the "time interval over which the signal to be
sampled is repetitive." If he is trying to asynchronously sample an unknown
waveform he has some more reading to do.

-marcel



Wed, 06 Apr 2005 14:48:34 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data

Quote:

> Krishna writes:

> > [..] but I believe you can indeed have 256 distinct complex
> > points in the fft for 256 *complex*time series data.

> There exists a nice packing scheme (see e.g. NRC) where you pack 512
> timepoints of a real signal as 256 complex samples of an artificial complex
> signal. If you input these into a standard FFT and unpack the complex
> frequency data properly, you will get 256 frequencies of the original 512
> point real sequence. This is the optimal way to do it when the input points
> are real (grabbed from an ADC or such).
> [...]

Yes, you can pack two real waveforms into the real and imaginary
parts of one complex waveform and get a "two for one deal" with
the appropriate fft routine. However, there are also cases when
you may need to take the fft of a complex "waveform". For example,
the Weiner-Khinchine Theorem says that the Fourier Transform of
the autocorrelation function of a signal directly gives the power
spectrum. If the autocorrelation function happens to be complex,
then the power spectrum can be asymmetric. The emitted light from
diode lasers is a good example of this case. This sort of situation
will occur when there is a correlation between the phase and
amplitude of the signal.

Krishna



Wed, 06 Apr 2005 21:54:24 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data

Quote:



> > You may want to look at the ordering scheme for
> > numerical FFTs presented in the book "Numerical
> > Recipes" by Press, et al. They state that the
> > ordering scheme that they use is the practical
> > standard. In their scheme, the first element in
> > the array is the real part of the zero frequency
> > component (f=0), the next element is the imaginary part
> > for f=0, the next pair corresponds to the real
> > and imaginary parts of f = 1/(2N dt) and so on
> > until midway through the data set. Then the next
> > point is for f= -1/(2 dt) and increases back towards
> > zero.

>     I don't think you can make this assumption.  [...]

Yes, I agree. However, it's one possibility to check if the
original poster can't figure out the ordering.

Quote:
> > Also, note that your fft does not have to be symmetric
> > if your original time domain data was complex. It's a
> > rather special case, but I believe you can indeed have
> > 256 distinct complex points in the fft for 256 *complex*
> > time series data.

>     I don't think I've seen that variation.

See my response to Marcel further down in the thread.

KM



Wed, 06 Apr 2005 21:57:26 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data

Quote:

> [...]
> However, there are also cases when you may need to take the
> fft of a complex "waveform". For example,
> the Weiner-Khinchine Theorem says that the Fourier Transform of
> the autocorrelation function of a signal directly gives the power
> spectrum. If the autocorrelation function happens to be complex,
> then the power spectrum can be asymmetric.
> [...]

In the case of a complex autocorrelation function, the real
part must have even symmetry and the imaginary part must have
odd symmetry. Taking the FT of such a function will give a
result which is real only (the imaginary part is zero). So
even though there are N distinct input points to the FT and N
distinct points in the output, half of the values in the
output (the imaginary parts of the N numbers) are zero. When
symmetry, complex conjugation for the case of the autocorrelation
function, is not present in the input points, then we may
expect that the N distinct output points will have more
information than N/2 values.

Krishna



Thu, 07 Apr 2005 21:33:07 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data
Hi David,

At risk of exposing my limited knowledge of FFTs :

The fundamental frequency has the largest amplitude, and since the harmonics
are positive integers, the fundamental must also have the lowest frequency
value.
With only 256 samples you will not be able to see many odd harmonics...

Regards

Howerd


Quote:
> Hi all,

> With the fft routine from motorola bbs, I'm able to generate 256
> frequency domain data from 256 time domain data. My question is from
> the 256 transformed data, how can i know which is the fundamental
> frequency components, let say f and its harmonics 2*f, 3*f, 4*f and so
> on?
> Please advise me on this.

> Albert



Fri, 08 Apr 2005 05:59:43 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data
Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain! (Howerd: you are
exposed.) :-)

There is no requirement that the fundamental of a waveform be present,
let alone that it have the largest amplitude. 256 real samples allow
determining the amplitudes of 128 frequencies. If the fundamental is low
enough, many of its harmonics can be represented, both odd and even.

Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

Quote:

> Hi David,

> At risk of exposing my limited knowledge of FFTs :

> The fundamental frequency has the largest amplitude, and since the harmonics
> are positive integers, the fundamental must also have the lowest frequency
> value.
> With only 256 samples you will not be able to see many odd harmonics...

> Regards

> Howerd



> > Hi all,

> > With the fft routine from motorola bbs, I'm able to generate 256
> > frequency domain data from 256 time domain data. My question is from
> > the 256 transformed data, how can i know which is the fundamental
> > frequency components, let say f and its harmonics 2*f, 3*f, 4*f and so
> > on?
> > Please advise me on this.

> > Albert



Fri, 08 Apr 2005 06:52:30 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data
Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain! (Howerd: you are
exposed.) :-)

There is no requirement that the fundamental be present in a waveform,
let alone that it have the largest amplitude. 256 real samples allow
determining the amplitudes of 128 frequencies. If the fundamental is low
enough, many of its harmonics can be represented, both odd and even.

Jerry
--
Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

Quote:

> Hi David,

> At risk of exposing my limited knowledge of FFTs :

> The fundamental frequency has the largest amplitude, and since the
harmonics
> are positive integers, the fundamental must also have the lowest frequency
> value.
> With only 256 samples you will not be able to see many odd harmonics...

> Regards

> Howerd



> > Hi all,

> > With the fft routine from motorola bbs, I'm able to generate 256
> > frequency domain data from 256 time domain data. My question is from
> > the 256 transformed data, how can i know which is the fundamental
> > frequency components, let say f and its harmonics 2*f, 3*f, 4*f and so
> > on?
> > Please advise me on this.

> > Albert



Fri, 08 Apr 2005 07:00:56 GMT  
 Harmonics in fft transformed data


Quote:
> Hi David,

> At risk of exposing my limited knowledge of FFTs :

> The fundamental frequency has the largest amplitude,

    I don't think this has to be true.

--

-Gary Chanson (MVP for Windows SDK)
-Software Consultant (Embedded systems and Real Time Controls)

-War is the last resort of the incompetent.



Fri, 08 Apr 2005 07:31:39 GMT  
 
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