Marlais 0.3 
Author Message
 Marlais 0.3

Kudos for an experimental implementation in C (once you get the past the
garbage collector port.) It seems to follow the book pretty closely,
and I'm waiting to get a hold of the design notes.

While watching all of the noise, religious wars, and fanaticism (excellent
points about syntax vs. internal forms) about algebraic vs. infix, what
it takes to be a real product and get market acceptance, &c, it occurred
to me that we could start a guerilla war and port some of the Scheme
tools (like SLIB) under Apple's aegis to at least give us a working
system. I/O interfaces are also pretty crucial, maybe we could start a
working group to define that.

My overall point is that we all have a certain interest in Dylan and
we seem to want it to succeed. Why not use the existing newsgroups to
contain working groups to develop the standards that we need/desire?
If Apple isn't forthcoming on the algebraic syntax, why not propose one?
Why not coordinate efforts to get Marlais out of experimentation and
into a basic development platform? The FSF (although philosophically
challenged/defective) have the basic idea by using the Internet to
distribute and gain support for software. Why not with Dylan?

-scottm

(don't start a flame war on the problem's with the FSF's philosophy,
reserve that for gnu.misc.discuss and alt.philosophy.objectivism.)



Mon, 27 May 1996 05:51:31 GMT  
 Marlais 0.3
Frank R Smith says:
[intellectually symmetric things!]

Post it anyway. I shouldn't be the only one pissing and moaning
about a bunch of bishops of the highly arcane holy and apostolic
Lisp arguing about the number of angels that can fit on the head
of a pin.

-scottm

Quote:
> Hi Scott,

> I wrote this note yesterday; it was intended for the net. But after
> reading your note a few minutes ago, I thought you might be amused to
> read this.

> ---------------

> Topics such as `What to call the [new] Dylan' and `the syntax' have been
> the subject of much discussion. In the main, I think this demonstrates a
> genuine concern and hope for the future of Dylan and to that end is
> positive.

> However, IMHO, it will be the community of Dylan users that determine
> the success or failure of the language. This will depend not only on the
> language but also on the tools, libraries and applications available on
> a wide range of platforms. In fact, 'C' and 'C++' are good examples of
> this.

> I feel that the supporters of the language might help in
> "getting Dylan of the ground" by commencing the task of designing and
> eventually developing such infrastructure--maybe in the spirit of FSF.

> For this to be successful and useful, I think that some
> direction/suggestion/steering needs to come from those most experienced
> and who have already expressed committent to the development of
> production environments for Dylan.

> This just might have a non-trivial effect on both of the issues
> mentioned at the top of this note :-)

> -------------

> I think your suggestion is a good one and for what its worth you have my
> support.

> Regards,
> frs
> --

> 38 Willow Gr, East Kew        Development and          Tel:   +61 3 859 4826
> Vic 3102, Australia.            Research pty ltd       Fax:   +61 3 859 1882



Tue, 28 May 1996 02:10:15 GMT  
 Marlais 0.3

Quote:

>My overall point is that we all have a certain interest in Dylan and
>we seem to want it to succeed.

I don't want Dylan to succeed at the expense of other languages
I prefer, any more that I want C++ to succeed at their expense.

-- jd



Thu, 06 Jun 1996 23:39:42 GMT  
 
 [ 3 post ] 

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