Pidgin progress 
Author Message
 Pidgin progress

Jeff Dubrule has joined the pidgin effort, and we're making progress. The
<c-type-repository> is finished (and fully integrated with the type model,
too).

Jeff spent Sunday evening separating the C parser from Melange and getting
it to compile on its own. We both learned quite a bit about the parser's
dependencies during this process. :-( Since then, I've reorganized the
standalone parser and made the first baby steps towards integration with
the ANSI-C library. About 600 lines of code now stand between us and a
working C parser.

Speaking of code, here's a breakdown of progress so far:

  parser-utilities library (mostly from Melange)
     76     196    2069 parser-utilities-exports.dylan
    134     491    4950 source-locations.dylan
    172     524    6027 parse-conditions.dylan
    221    1018    8107 multistring.dylan
    603    2229   21153 total

  ANSI-C library (new)
    159     194    3376 ansi-c-exports.dylan
    553    1678   16662 c-types.dylan
    201     684    6469 c-type-repository.dylan
    231     699    7374 c-declarations.dylan
     27      70     719 c-file.dylan
   1171    3325   34600 total

  c-parser library (from Melange, now standalone but broken)
    108     240    2747 c-parser-exports.dylan
   1601    7187   61644 c-lexer.dylan
    628    2942   24278 c-lexer-cpp.dylan
   1659    5151   49309 c-parser-engine.input
     42      87     923 c-parser-stubs.dylan
    566    2568   22297 c-parser.dylan
   4604   18175  161198 total

  ansi-c-test application (new)
     22      36     286 ansi-c-test-exports.dylan
    227     654    8421 ansi-c-test.dylan
    249     690    8707 total

You'll note that out of about 6,600 lines, over 4,900 originated in CMU
Melange. That's about 75% of the work, so the original Gwydion Group
deserves at least 75% of the credit. Of course, counting lines of code is
silly, but it demonstrates a point--the folks at CMU deserve most of the
credit for Gwydion Dylan, in even in the areas where we're writing lots of
new code.

On another note, Peter Hinely posted a message to gd-hackers describing
Hawaiian pidgin:

  I speak pidgin. It is very popular here in Hawaii.  There are quite a few
  books on Hawaiian pidgin such as this one:

    "Pidgin to Da Max"
    Douglas Simonson, Pat Sasaki, and Ken Sakata
    The best-selling illustrated dictionary of "pidgin" English.
    112 pages, 7-1/2" x 9-1/4", ISBN: 0-935848-41-X, $9.95

Lingophiles might want to zip on over to the favorite online bookstore and
grab a copy.

Cheers,
Eric



Fri, 14 Sep 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Pidgin progress

Quote:

> On another note, Peter Hinely posted a message to gd-hackers describing
> Hawaiian pidgin:

>   I speak pidgin. It is very popular here in Hawaii.  There are quite a few
>   books on Hawaiian pidgin such as this one:

>     "Pidgin to Da Max"
>     Douglas Simonson, Pat Sasaki, and Ken Sakata
>     The best-selling illustrated dictionary of "pidgin" English.
>     112 pages, 7-1/2" x 9-1/4", ISBN: 0-935848-41-X, $9.95

> Lingophiles might want to zip on over to the favorite online bookstore and
> grab a copy.

Peter Hinely has asked me to point out that he doesn't endorse this
book--he only saw it in a bookstore.

We'll be collecting a bibliography and recommendations on this subject if
anyone is interested.

Cheers,
Eric



Fri, 14 Sep 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Pidgin progress

I thought that "Pidgin" was a general term for English/Other language
Creoles. My company has a strong African connection and several of the
guys can speak a Nigerian Pidgin. I'm not sure that the language is
standard, although an old line manager of mine assured me that a
particularly comprehensive Bible company in London did a Pidgin Bible.
:-)

- Rob.

Quote:


> > On another note, Peter Hinely posted a message to gd-hackers describing
> > Hawaiian pidgin:

> >   I speak pidgin. It is very popular here in Hawaii.  There are quite a few
> >   books on Hawaiian pidgin such as this one:

> >     "Pidgin to Da Max"
> >     Douglas Simonson, Pat Sasaki, and Ken Sakata
> >     The best-selling illustrated dictionary of "pidgin" English.
> >     112 pages, 7-1/2" x 9-1/4", ISBN: 0-935848-41-X, $9.95

> > Lingophiles might want to zip on over to the favorite online bookstore and
> > grab a copy.

> Peter Hinely has asked me to point out that he doesn't endorse this
> book--he only saw it in a bookstore.

> We'll be collecting a bibliography and recommendations on this subject if
> anyone is interested.

> Cheers,
> Eric

--
__________________________________________________________________
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http://www.lostwax.com/  / /__/ _ \(_-</ __/  | |/ |/ / - `/\ \ /
                        /____/\___/___/\__/   |__/|__/\_,_//_\_\


Sat, 15 Sep 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 Pidgin progress


    Date: Tue, 30 Mar 1999 10:05:45 +0100

    I thought that "Pidgin" was a general term for English/Other language
    Creoles. My company has a strong African connection and several of the
    guys can speak a Nigerian Pidgin. I'm not sure that the language is
    standard, although an old line manager of mine assured me that a
    particularly comprehensive Bible company in London did a Pidgin Bible.

A "pidgin" is a first-generation "artificially" constructed language
that forms by the mixing of several languages.  A pidgin, by
definition, is never a "mother tongue".  They often crop up, for
example, when new trade occurs between peoples who don't speak the
same language.  Not surprisingly, there are many "pidgin" languages.

A "creole" is what occurs when children grow up speaking a pidgin as a
first language.  That is, a creole _is_ a mother tongue for some group
of people.  A pidgin typically has a "broken" grammar -- lots of odd
and ends and inconsistencies.  Children have uniquely capable language
capabilities that are "generative", and the result is that creoles
have a "natural" grammar that is internally consistent; the
creolization of a pidgin occurs in a single generation.

In American English, the word capital-C "Creole" is applied to urban
speakers of a French- and Spanish-based creole that includes some
English and some West African words.  The word "pidgin", as far as I
can tell, is often misapplied to languages that are actually creoles,
presumably because they recently started as pidgins.

I don't know if Hawaiian Pidgin is really a pidgin, or if it is by now
a true creole.


    >

    > > On another note, Peter Hinely posted a message to gd-hackers describing
    > > Hawaiian pidgin:
    > >
    > >   I speak pidgin. It is very popular here in Hawaii.  There are quite a few
    > >   books on Hawaiian pidgin such as this one:
    > >
    > >     "Pidgin to Da Max"
    > >     Douglas Simonson, Pat Sasaki, and Ken Sakata
    > >     The best-selling illustrated dictionary of "pidgin" English.
    > >     112 pages, 7-1/2" x 9-1/4", ISBN: 0-935848-41-X, $9.95
    > >
    > > Lingophiles might want to zip on over to the favorite online bookstore and
    > > grab a copy.
    >
    > Peter Hinely has asked me to point out that he doesn't endorse this
    > book--he only saw it in a bookstore.
    >
    > We'll be collecting a bibliography and recommendations on this subject if
    > anyone is interested.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > Eric

    --
    __________________________________________________________________
                               __            __    _      __        

    http://www.lostwax.com/  / /__/ _ \(_-</ __/  | |/ |/ / - `/\ \ /
                            /____/\___/___/\__/   |__/|__/\_,_//_\_\



Sat, 15 Sep 2001 03:00:00 GMT  
 
 [ 5 post ] 

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