OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease 
Author Message
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease

Hi all,

As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad cow
(BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
information<g>  

The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to Mad
Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to what
is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular structures,
and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related to
the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and toughest
viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>  BSE
is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used in
meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths in
a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.  

The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected meat/brain
are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular CJD
from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat processing
plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
hamburgers and other processed food.  

For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest going
to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
http://www.*-*-*.com/
National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD Surveilance
Unit web page also has lot of information at http://www.*-*-*.com/

Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

Best regards,

Arnr Baldvinsson
Icetips Software        
San Antonio, Texas, USA
www.icetips.com

Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
http://www.*-*-*.com/



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 07:20:27 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
Nice info.  It is extremely rare.

But don't forget that part of the stats of why so few die from it is
directly related to how quickly all countries close their borders to it.
Hopefully, Canada will contain this quickly.

--

- Andrew Guidroz II (GeeTroze)


Quote:
> Hi all,

> As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad cow
> (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
> outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> information<g>

> The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to Mad
> Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to what
> is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
> America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
> to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular structures,
> and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related to
> the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and toughest
> viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
> boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
> in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>  BSE
> is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used in
> meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths in
> a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
> years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected meat/brain
> are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular CJD
> from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
> the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat processing
> plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
> which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> hamburgers and other processed food.

> For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest going
> to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/cjd.htm which is at the
> National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD Surveilance
> Unit web page also has lot of information at http://www.cjd.ed.ac.uk/

> Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> Best regards,

> Arnr Baldvinsson
> Icetips Software
> San Antonio, Texas, USA
> www.icetips.com

> Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 07:24:58 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
I meant the disease is extremely rare, not the nice info <g>.

--

- Andrew Guidroz II (GeeTroze)



Quote:
> Nice info.  It is extremely rare.

> But don't forget that part of the stats of why so few die from it is
> directly related to how quickly all countries close their borders to it.
> Hopefully, Canada will contain this quickly.

> --

> - Andrew Guidroz II (GeeTroze)



> > Hi all,

> > As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad cow
> > (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
> > outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> > information<g>

> > The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to Mad
> > Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to what
> > is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> > From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
> > America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
> > to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular structures,
> > and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> > infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related to
> > the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and toughest
> > viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
> > boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
> > in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>  BSE
> > is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used in
> > meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> > CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths in
> > a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> > people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
> > years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> > hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> > The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected meat/brain
> > are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular CJD
> > from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
> > the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> > nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> > Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat processing
> > plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
> > which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> > hamburgers and other processed food.

> > For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest going
> > to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> > http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/cjd.htm which is at the
> > National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD Surveilance
> > Unit web page also has lot of information at http://www.cjd.ed.ac.uk/

> > Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> > Best regards,

> > Arnr Baldvinsson
> > Icetips Software
> > San Antonio, Texas, USA
> > www.icetips.com

> > Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> > http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 07:28:09 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
Hi Arnor.
As my primary job is as a Dairy Cattle Veterinarian I thought I might make a
comment here too.

Whilst vCJD is indeed different to CJD, the difference is in what scientests
see when they analyse brains at post mortem and in how the disease is
transmitted.  Both diseases look exactly the same clinically and are
disastrous for those that get them.

There are several related diseases - scrapie in sheep, kuru in man,
Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy in mink), Chronic wasting disease of Deer,
and various others.

The scary thing about these diseases is that they are the only known
"infectious" diseases that contain no DNA or RNA.  They are made entirely of
protein, and are labeled "Prions" for Protein Infectious Organisms.  They
are almost indestructible.  Boiling temperature won't denature them I can't
really use the word Kill because they are not really a life form according
to current definitions!

They all seem to have preferences for different species - scrapie in sheep
does not cause BSE in cattle.  At least that used to be the conventional
wisdom.  If you give scrapie to Minks, they get sick.  If you then feed
these Mink to cattle, they develop BSE!

In my humble opinion, these TSE's (Transmissible Spongiform
Encepholopathies) are the scariest disease I've ever heard of.

The good news is that it should be very easy to control - at least from the
point of view of Human Health.

Firstly, Don't eat Brains or spinal chords.  The rest of the animal is safe.
Striated muscle meat (steaks, roasts, ground beef, etc.), fat, bone and milk
are NOT infective, since these tissues do not contain the BSE- causing
agent. This is something that as individuals we can all do and we will then
be quite safe.

Secondly, don't feed animal protein to other animals.  Feed sheep and cattle
foodstuffs made from plant material or animal fat.  This is something that
Governments can do (and for the most part already have done) at a
legislative level.

In Australia, we are quite lucky as we introduced laws which prohibited the
feeding of animal protein to cloven hoofed animals more than 30 years ago as
a protection against the introduction of Foot and Mouth disease.  It is a
major offense to feed swill to pigs in Australia!  This probably saved us
from getting BSE.

In Summary, if you and your government follow 2 simple rules, you will be
ok.

Cheers!

Dave Beggs
(or should I be calling myself adsd9s87!?)


Quote:
> Hi all,

> As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad cow
> (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
> outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> information<g>

> The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to Mad
> Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to what
> is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
> America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
> to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular structures,
> and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related to
> the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and toughest
> viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
> boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
> in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>  BSE
> is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used in
> meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths in
> a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
> years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected meat/brain
> are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular CJD
> from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
> the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat processing
> plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
> which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> hamburgers and other processed food.

> For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest going
> to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/cjd.htm which is at the
> National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD Surveilance
> Unit web page also has lot of information at http://www.cjd.ed.ac.uk/

> Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> Best regards,

> Arnr Baldvinsson
> Icetips Software
> San Antonio, Texas, USA
> www.icetips.com

> Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 08:39:25 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
Skipping brain and spinal cord would certainly curb my diet.

There have been one or two cases that are believed to have been transmitted
via squirrel brains.  Thankfully, I'm clean thus far.

--

- Andrew Guidroz II (GeeTroze)



Quote:
> Hi Arnor.
> As my primary job is as a Dairy Cattle Veterinarian I thought I might make
a
> comment here too.

> Whilst vCJD is indeed different to CJD, the difference is in what
scientests
> see when they analyse brains at post mortem and in how the disease is
> transmitted.  Both diseases look exactly the same clinically and are
> disastrous for those that get them.

> There are several related diseases - scrapie in sheep, kuru in man,
> Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy in mink), Chronic wasting disease of
Deer,
> and various others.

> The scary thing about these diseases is that they are the only known
> "infectious" diseases that contain no DNA or RNA.  They are made entirely
of
> protein, and are labeled "Prions" for Protein Infectious Organisms.  They
> are almost indestructible.  Boiling temperature won't denature them I
can't
> really use the word Kill because they are not really a life form according
> to current definitions!

> They all seem to have preferences for different species - scrapie in sheep
> does not cause BSE in cattle.  At least that used to be the conventional
> wisdom.  If you give scrapie to Minks, they get sick.  If you then feed
> these Mink to cattle, they develop BSE!

> In my humble opinion, these TSE's (Transmissible Spongiform
> Encepholopathies) are the scariest disease I've ever heard of.

> The good news is that it should be very easy to control - at least from
the
> point of view of Human Health.

> Firstly, Don't eat Brains or spinal chords.  The rest of the animal is
safe.
> Striated muscle meat (steaks, roasts, ground beef, etc.), fat, bone and
milk
> are NOT infective, since these tissues do not contain the BSE- causing
> agent. This is something that as individuals we can all do and we will
then
> be quite safe.

> Secondly, don't feed animal protein to other animals.  Feed sheep and
cattle
> foodstuffs made from plant material or animal fat.  This is something that
> Governments can do (and for the most part already have done) at a
> legislative level.

> In Australia, we are quite lucky as we introduced laws which prohibited
the
> feeding of animal protein to cloven hoofed animals more than 30 years ago
as
> a protection against the introduction of Foot and Mouth disease.  It is a
> major offense to feed swill to pigs in Australia!  This probably saved us
> from getting BSE.

> In Summary, if you and your government follow 2 simple rules, you will be
> ok.

> Cheers!

> Dave Beggs
> (or should I be calling myself adsd9s87!?)



> > Hi all,

> > As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad cow
> > (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
> > outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> > information<g>

> > The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to Mad
> > Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to what
> > is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> > From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
> > America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
> > to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular structures,
> > and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> > infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related to
> > the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and toughest
> > viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
> > boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
> > in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>  BSE
> > is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used in
> > meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> > CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths in
> > a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> > people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
> > years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> > hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> > The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected meat/brain
> > are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular CJD
> > from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
> > the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> > nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> > Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat processing
> > plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
> > which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> > hamburgers and other processed food.

> > For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest going
> > to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> > http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/cjd.htm which is at the
> > National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD Surveilance
> > Unit web page also has lot of information at http://www.cjd.ed.ac.uk/

> > Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> > Best regards,

> > Arnr Baldvinsson
> > Icetips Software
> > San Antonio, Texas, USA
> > www.icetips.com

> > Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> > http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 08:46:22 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease

Quote:
> Thankfully, I'm clean thus far.

really?!!

<g>
Dave



Quote:
> Skipping brain and spinal cord would certainly curb my diet.

> There have been one or two cases that are believed to have been
transmitted
> via squirrel brains.  Thankfully, I'm clean thus far.

> --

> - Andrew Guidroz II (GeeTroze)



> > Hi Arnor.
> > As my primary job is as a Dairy Cattle Veterinarian I thought I might
make
> a
> > comment here too.

> > Whilst vCJD is indeed different to CJD, the difference is in what
> scientests
> > see when they analyse brains at post mortem and in how the disease is
> > transmitted.  Both diseases look exactly the same clinically and are
> > disastrous for those that get them.

> > There are several related diseases - scrapie in sheep, kuru in man,
> > Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy in mink), Chronic wasting disease of
> Deer,
> > and various others.

> > The scary thing about these diseases is that they are the only known
> > "infectious" diseases that contain no DNA or RNA.  They are made
entirely
> of
> > protein, and are labeled "Prions" for Protein Infectious Organisms.
They
> > are almost indestructible.  Boiling temperature won't denature them I
> can't
> > really use the word Kill because they are not really a life form
according
> > to current definitions!

> > They all seem to have preferences for different species - scrapie in
sheep
> > does not cause BSE in cattle.  At least that used to be the conventional
> > wisdom.  If you give scrapie to Minks, they get sick.  If you then feed
> > these Mink to cattle, they develop BSE!

> > In my humble opinion, these TSE's (Transmissible Spongiform
> > Encepholopathies) are the scariest disease I've ever heard of.

> > The good news is that it should be very easy to control - at least from
> the
> > point of view of Human Health.

> > Firstly, Don't eat Brains or spinal chords.  The rest of the animal is
> safe.
> > Striated muscle meat (steaks, roasts, ground beef, etc.), fat, bone and
> milk
> > are NOT infective, since these tissues do not contain the BSE- causing
> > agent. This is something that as individuals we can all do and we will
> then
> > be quite safe.

> > Secondly, don't feed animal protein to other animals.  Feed sheep and
> cattle
> > foodstuffs made from plant material or animal fat.  This is something
that
> > Governments can do (and for the most part already have done) at a
> > legislative level.

> > In Australia, we are quite lucky as we introduced laws which prohibited
> the
> > feeding of animal protein to cloven hoofed animals more than 30 years
ago
> as
> > a protection against the introduction of Foot and Mouth disease.  It is
a
> > major offense to feed swill to pigs in Australia!  This probably saved
us
> > from getting BSE.

> > In Summary, if you and your government follow 2 simple rules, you will
be
> > ok.

> > Cheers!

> > Dave Beggs
> > (or should I be calling myself adsd9s87!?)



> > > Hi all,

> > > As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad cow
> > > (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
> > > outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> > > information<g>

> > > The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to Mad
> > > Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to what
> > > is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> > > From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
> > > America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
> > > to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular structures,
> > > and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> > > infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related to
> > > the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and toughest
> > > viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
> > > boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
> > > in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>  BSE
> > > is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used in
> > > meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> > > CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths in
> > > a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> > > people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
> > > years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> > > hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> > > The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected meat/brain
> > > are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular CJD
> > > from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
> > > the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> > > nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> > > Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat processing
> > > plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
> > > which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> > > hamburgers and other processed food.

> > > For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest going
> > > to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> > > http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/cjd.htm which is at the
> > > National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD Surveilance
> > > Unit web page also has lot of information at http://www.cjd.ed.ac.uk/

> > > Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> > > Best regards,

> > > Arnr Baldvinsson
> > > Icetips Software
> > > San Antonio, Texas, USA
> > > www.icetips.com

> > > Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> > > http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 08:56:02 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
That's considered a delicacy here ... although I guess there really aren't
squirrels there in Australia.

Now, I wonder if cooking backbone stew from deer or pork would put you at
risk in the spinal column area....

--

- Andrew Guidroz II (GeeTroze)



Quote:
> > Thankfully, I'm clean thus far.

> really?!!

> <g>
> Dave



> > Skipping brain and spinal cord would certainly curb my diet.

> > There have been one or two cases that are believed to have been
> transmitted
> > via squirrel brains.  Thankfully, I'm clean thus far.

> > --

> > - Andrew Guidroz II (GeeTroze)



> > > Hi Arnor.
> > > As my primary job is as a Dairy Cattle Veterinarian I thought I might
> make
> > a
> > > comment here too.

> > > Whilst vCJD is indeed different to CJD, the difference is in what
> > scientests
> > > see when they analyse brains at post mortem and in how the disease is
> > > transmitted.  Both diseases look exactly the same clinically and are
> > > disastrous for those that get them.

> > > There are several related diseases - scrapie in sheep, kuru in man,
> > > Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy in mink), Chronic wasting disease of
> > Deer,
> > > and various others.

> > > The scary thing about these diseases is that they are the only known
> > > "infectious" diseases that contain no DNA or RNA.  They are made
> entirely
> > of
> > > protein, and are labeled "Prions" for Protein Infectious Organisms.
> They
> > > are almost indestructible.  Boiling temperature won't denature them I
> > can't
> > > really use the word Kill because they are not really a life form
> according
> > > to current definitions!

> > > They all seem to have preferences for different species - scrapie in
> sheep
> > > does not cause BSE in cattle.  At least that used to be the
conventional
> > > wisdom.  If you give scrapie to Minks, they get sick.  If you then
feed
> > > these Mink to cattle, they develop BSE!

> > > In my humble opinion, these TSE's (Transmissible Spongiform
> > > Encepholopathies) are the scariest disease I've ever heard of.

> > > The good news is that it should be very easy to control - at least
from
> > the
> > > point of view of Human Health.

> > > Firstly, Don't eat Brains or spinal chords.  The rest of the animal is
> > safe.
> > > Striated muscle meat (steaks, roasts, ground beef, etc.), fat, bone
and
> > milk
> > > are NOT infective, since these tissues do not contain the BSE- causing
> > > agent. This is something that as individuals we can all do and we will
> > then
> > > be quite safe.

> > > Secondly, don't feed animal protein to other animals.  Feed sheep and
> > cattle
> > > foodstuffs made from plant material or animal fat.  This is something
> that
> > > Governments can do (and for the most part already have done) at a
> > > legislative level.

> > > In Australia, we are quite lucky as we introduced laws which
prohibited
> > the
> > > feeding of animal protein to cloven hoofed animals more than 30 years
> ago
> > as
> > > a protection against the introduction of Foot and Mouth disease.  It
is
> a
> > > major offense to feed swill to pigs in Australia!  This probably saved
> us
> > > from getting BSE.

> > > In Summary, if you and your government follow 2 simple rules, you will
> be
> > > ok.

> > > Cheers!

> > > Dave Beggs
> > > (or should I be calling myself adsd9s87!?)



> > > > Hi all,

> > > > As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad
cow
> > > > (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
> > > > outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> > > > information<g>

> > > > The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to
Mad
> > > > Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to
what
> > > > is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> > > > From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
> > > > America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
> > > > to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular
structures,
> > > > and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> > > > infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related
to
> > > > the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and
toughest
> > > > viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
> > > > boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
> > > > in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>
BSE
> > > > is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used
in
> > > > meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> > > > CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths
in
> > > > a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> > > > people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
> > > > years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> > > > hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> > > > The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected
meat/brain
> > > > are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular
CJD
> > > > from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
> > > > the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> > > > nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> > > > Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat
processing
> > > > plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
> > > > which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> > > > hamburgers and other processed food.

> > > > For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest
going
> > > > to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> > > > http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/cjd.htm which is at the
> > > > National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD
Surveilance
> > > > Unit web page also has lot of information at

http://www.cjd.ed.ac.uk/

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> > > > Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> > > > Best regards,

> > > > Arnr Baldvinsson
> > > > Icetips Software
> > > > San Antonio, Texas, USA
> > > > www.icetips.com

> > > > Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> > > > http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 08:59:56 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
If the slaughtering process is not done carefully, brain and spinal cord
matter can contaminate meat.

Jim.



Quote:
> Hi Arnor.
> As my primary job is as a Dairy Cattle Veterinarian I thought I might make
a
> comment here too.

> Whilst vCJD is indeed different to CJD, the difference is in what
scientests
> see when they analyse brains at post mortem and in how the disease is
> transmitted.  Both diseases look exactly the same clinically and are
> disastrous for those that get them.

> There are several related diseases - scrapie in sheep, kuru in man,
> Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy in mink), Chronic wasting disease of
Deer,
> and various others.

> The scary thing about these diseases is that they are the only known
> "infectious" diseases that contain no DNA or RNA.  They are made entirely
of
> protein, and are labeled "Prions" for Protein Infectious Organisms.  They
> are almost indestructible.  Boiling temperature won't denature them I
can't
> really use the word Kill because they are not really a life form according
> to current definitions!

> They all seem to have preferences for different species - scrapie in sheep
> does not cause BSE in cattle.  At least that used to be the conventional
> wisdom.  If you give scrapie to Minks, they get sick.  If you then feed
> these Mink to cattle, they develop BSE!

> In my humble opinion, these TSE's (Transmissible Spongiform
> Encepholopathies) are the scariest disease I've ever heard of.

> The good news is that it should be very easy to control - at least from
the
> point of view of Human Health.

> Firstly, Don't eat Brains or spinal chords.  The rest of the animal is
safe.
> Striated muscle meat (steaks, roasts, ground beef, etc.), fat, bone and
milk
> are NOT infective, since these tissues do not contain the BSE- causing
> agent. This is something that as individuals we can all do and we will
then
> be quite safe.

> Secondly, don't feed animal protein to other animals.  Feed sheep and
cattle
> foodstuffs made from plant material or animal fat.  This is something that
> Governments can do (and for the most part already have done) at a
> legislative level.

> In Australia, we are quite lucky as we introduced laws which prohibited
the
> feeding of animal protein to cloven hoofed animals more than 30 years ago
as
> a protection against the introduction of Foot and Mouth disease.  It is a
> major offense to feed swill to pigs in Australia!  This probably saved us
> from getting BSE.

> In Summary, if you and your government follow 2 simple rules, you will be
> ok.

> Cheers!

> Dave Beggs
> (or should I be calling myself adsd9s87!?)



> > Hi all,

> > As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad cow
> > (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
> > outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> > information<g>

> > The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to Mad
> > Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to what
> > is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> > From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
> > America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
> > to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular structures,
> > and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> > infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related to
> > the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and toughest
> > viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
> > boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
> > in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>  BSE
> > is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used in
> > meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> > CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths in
> > a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> > people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
> > years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> > hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> > The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected meat/brain
> > are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular CJD
> > from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
> > the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> > nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> > Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat processing
> > plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
> > which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> > hamburgers and other processed food.

> > For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest going
> > to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> > http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/cjd.htm which is at the
> > National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD Surveilance
> > Unit web page also has lot of information at http://www.cjd.ed.ac.uk/

> > Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> > Best regards,

> > Arnr Baldvinsson
> > Icetips Software
> > San Antonio, Texas, USA
> > www.icetips.com

> > Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> > http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 10:00:21 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
Jim
_almost_ makes you want to be a vegan :-)
Regards
Randy


Quote:
> If the slaughtering process is not done carefully, brain and spinal cord
> matter can contaminate meat.

> Jim.



> > Hi Arnor.
> > As my primary job is as a Dairy Cattle Veterinarian I thought I might
make
> a
> > comment here too.

> > Whilst vCJD is indeed different to CJD, the difference is in what
> scientests
> > see when they analyse brains at post mortem and in how the disease is
> > transmitted.  Both diseases look exactly the same clinically and are
> > disastrous for those that get them.

> > There are several related diseases - scrapie in sheep, kuru in man,
> > Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy in mink), Chronic wasting disease of
> Deer,
> > and various others.

> > The scary thing about these diseases is that they are the only known
> > "infectious" diseases that contain no DNA or RNA.  They are made
entirely
> of
> > protein, and are labeled "Prions" for Protein Infectious Organisms.
They
> > are almost indestructible.  Boiling temperature won't denature them I
> can't
> > really use the word Kill because they are not really a life form
according
> > to current definitions!

> > They all seem to have preferences for different species - scrapie in
sheep
> > does not cause BSE in cattle.  At least that used to be the conventional
> > wisdom.  If you give scrapie to Minks, they get sick.  If you then feed
> > these Mink to cattle, they develop BSE!

> > In my humble opinion, these TSE's (Transmissible Spongiform
> > Encepholopathies) are the scariest disease I've ever heard of.

> > The good news is that it should be very easy to control - at least from
> the
> > point of view of Human Health.

> > Firstly, Don't eat Brains or spinal chords.  The rest of the animal is
> safe.
> > Striated muscle meat (steaks, roasts, ground beef, etc.), fat, bone and
> milk
> > are NOT infective, since these tissues do not contain the BSE- causing
> > agent. This is something that as individuals we can all do and we will
> then
> > be quite safe.

> > Secondly, don't feed animal protein to other animals.  Feed sheep and
> cattle
> > foodstuffs made from plant material or animal fat.  This is something
that
> > Governments can do (and for the most part already have done) at a
> > legislative level.

> > In Australia, we are quite lucky as we introduced laws which prohibited
> the
> > feeding of animal protein to cloven hoofed animals more than 30 years
ago
> as
> > a protection against the introduction of Foot and Mouth disease.  It is
a
> > major offense to feed swill to pigs in Australia!  This probably saved
us
> > from getting BSE.

> > In Summary, if you and your government follow 2 simple rules, you will
be
> > ok.

> > Cheers!

> > Dave Beggs
> > (or should I be calling myself adsd9s87!?)



> > > Hi all,

> > > As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad cow
> > > (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
> > > outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> > > information<g>

> > > The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to Mad
> > > Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to what
> > > is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> > > From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
> > > America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
> > > to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular structures,
> > > and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> > > infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related to
> > > the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and toughest
> > > viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
> > > boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
> > > in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>  BSE
> > > is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used in
> > > meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> > > CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths in
> > > a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> > > people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
> > > years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> > > hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> > > The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected meat/brain
> > > are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular CJD
> > > from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
> > > the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> > > nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> > > Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat processing
> > > plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
> > > which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> > > hamburgers and other processed food.

> > > For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest going
> > > to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> > > http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/cjd.htm which is at the
> > > National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD Surveilance
> > > Unit web page also has lot of information at http://www.cjd.ed.ac.uk/

> > > Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> > > Best regards,

> > > Arnr Baldvinsson
> > > Icetips Software
> > > San Antonio, Texas, USA
> > > www.icetips.com

> > > Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> > > http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 10:29:04 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
adsd9s87
Quote:
>contain no DNA or RNA

_that_ _is_ _scarey_
man made?
:-)
randy



Quote:
> Hi Arnor.
> As my primary job is as a Dairy Cattle Veterinarian I thought I might make
a
> comment here too.

> Whilst vCJD is indeed different to CJD, the difference is in what
scientests
> see when they analyse brains at post mortem and in how the disease is
> transmitted.  Both diseases look exactly the same clinically and are
> disastrous for those that get them.

> There are several related diseases - scrapie in sheep, kuru in man,
> Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy in mink), Chronic wasting disease of
Deer,
> and various others.

> The scary thing about these diseases is that they are the only known
> "infectious" diseases that contain no DNA or RNA.  They are made entirely
of
> protein, and are labeled "Prions" for Protein Infectious Organisms.  They
> are almost indestructible.  Boiling temperature won't denature them I
can't
> really use the word Kill because they are not really a life form according
> to current definitions!

> They all seem to have preferences for different species - scrapie in sheep
> does not cause BSE in cattle.  At least that used to be the conventional
> wisdom.  If you give scrapie to Minks, they get sick.  If you then feed
> these Mink to cattle, they develop BSE!

> In my humble opinion, these TSE's (Transmissible Spongiform
> Encepholopathies) are the scariest disease I've ever heard of.

> The good news is that it should be very easy to control - at least from
the
> point of view of Human Health.

> Firstly, Don't eat Brains or spinal chords.  The rest of the animal is
safe.
> Striated muscle meat (steaks, roasts, ground beef, etc.), fat, bone and
milk
> are NOT infective, since these tissues do not contain the BSE- causing
> agent. This is something that as individuals we can all do and we will
then
> be quite safe.

> Secondly, don't feed animal protein to other animals.  Feed sheep and
cattle
> foodstuffs made from plant material or animal fat.  This is something that
> Governments can do (and for the most part already have done) at a
> legislative level.

> In Australia, we are quite lucky as we introduced laws which prohibited
the
> feeding of animal protein to cloven hoofed animals more than 30 years ago
as
> a protection against the introduction of Foot and Mouth disease.  It is a
> major offense to feed swill to pigs in Australia!  This probably saved us
> from getting BSE.

> In Summary, if you and your government follow 2 simple rules, you will be
> ok.

> Cheers!

> Dave Beggs
> (or should I be calling myself adsd9s87!?)



> > Hi all,

> > As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad cow
> > (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
> > outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> > information<g>

> > The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to Mad
> > Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to what
> > is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> > From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
> > America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
> > to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular structures,
> > and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> > infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related to
> > the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and toughest
> > viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
> > boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
> > in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>  BSE
> > is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used in
> > meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> > CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths in
> > a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> > people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
> > years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> > hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> > The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected meat/brain
> > are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular CJD
> > from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
> > the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> > nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> > Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat processing
> > plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
> > which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> > hamburgers and other processed food.

> > For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest going
> > to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> > http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/cjd.htm which is at the
> > National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD Surveilance
> > Unit web page also has lot of information at http://www.cjd.ed.ac.uk/

> > Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> > Best regards,

> > Arnr Baldvinsson
> > Icetips Software
> > San Antonio, Texas, USA
> > www.icetips.com

> > Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> > http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 10:31:36 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
Hi David,

On Sun, 25 May 2003 10:39:25 +1000, "David S. Beggs"

Quote:

>transmitted.  Both diseases look exactly the same clinically and are
>disastrous for those that get them.

Ah, I wasn't sure about that, it seemed from the material I read that
they were not identical.

Quote:
>are almost indestructible.  Boiling temperature won't denature them I can't
>really use the word Kill because they are not really a life form according
>to current definitions!

That's scary and also very interesting - I was a farmer in Iceland
before I started wandering around the world<g>  We were unfortunate
enough to get scrapies in our sheep back in 87 I think it was and
almost the entire population of sheep in the East Iceland was culled
off in a massive attempt to terminate the disease.  It didn't quite
succede, but I think a lot was learned in the behaviour of the disease
and prevention, like cleaning etc.

Quote:
>Firstly, Don't eat Brains or spinal chords.  The rest of the animal is safe.

Darn!<g>

In Iceland we have very strict regulations as to import of animals.
Basically NO animals can be imported to Iceland without weeks and
months in quarrantine and sheep, horses, cattle can not be imported
except as embryos and that is only done from a quarantine island
several miles off the North coast of Iceland.  Unfortunately these
regulations weren't in place at the beginning of the 20th century and
sheep were imported from Scotland which later developed scrapies and
some other diseases that at one point back in the fifties almost
completely destroyed sheep farming in Iceland.

Best regards,

Arnr Baldvinsson
Icetips Software        
San Antonio, Texas, USA
www.icetips.com

Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 11:55:46 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
Hi Arnor.

Quote:
> In Iceland we have very strict regulations as to import of animals.
> Basically NO animals can be imported to Iceland without weeks and
> months in quarrantine and sheep, horses, cattle can not be imported
> except as embryos and that is only done from a quarantine island
> several miles off the North coast of Iceland.

I am not sure that this will help.  The incubation time for these diseases
is often years rather than months.  Also, there is some evidence for in
utero transmission from cow to calf.  I don't know whether this would occur
in Embryo transfer though.

If you don't feed your stock from the risky feeds, it won't spread though.

Cheers!

Dave



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 13:15:40 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
Hi Randy.

I doubt we invented the Prion since scrapie has been around since the 40s or
before, and Kuru (a Prion disease of {*filter*}s in Papua New Guinea which
died out when they stopped eating each other) was first discovered in the
1950s.
We may have been inadvertantly responsible for BSE though, by feeding animal
protein to our ruminant livestock.
Cheers!
Dave

Quote:
> adsd9s87
> >contain no DNA or RNA
> _that_ _is_ _scarey_
> man made?
> :-)
> randy



> > Hi Arnor.
> > As my primary job is as a Dairy Cattle Veterinarian I thought I might
make
> a
> > comment here too.

> > Whilst vCJD is indeed different to CJD, the difference is in what
> scientests
> > see when they analyse brains at post mortem and in how the disease is
> > transmitted.  Both diseases look exactly the same clinically and are
> > disastrous for those that get them.

> > There are several related diseases - scrapie in sheep, kuru in man,
> > Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy in mink), Chronic wasting disease of
> Deer,
> > and various others.

> > The scary thing about these diseases is that they are the only known
> > "infectious" diseases that contain no DNA or RNA.  They are made
entirely
> of
> > protein, and are labeled "Prions" for Protein Infectious Organisms.
They
> > are almost indestructible.  Boiling temperature won't denature them I
> can't
> > really use the word Kill because they are not really a life form
according
> > to current definitions!

> > They all seem to have preferences for different species - scrapie in
sheep
> > does not cause BSE in cattle.  At least that used to be the conventional
> > wisdom.  If you give scrapie to Minks, they get sick.  If you then feed
> > these Mink to cattle, they develop BSE!

> > In my humble opinion, these TSE's (Transmissible Spongiform
> > Encepholopathies) are the scariest disease I've ever heard of.

> > The good news is that it should be very easy to control - at least from
> the
> > point of view of Human Health.

> > Firstly, Don't eat Brains or spinal chords.  The rest of the animal is
> safe.
> > Striated muscle meat (steaks, roasts, ground beef, etc.), fat, bone and
> milk
> > are NOT infective, since these tissues do not contain the BSE- causing
> > agent. This is something that as individuals we can all do and we will
> then
> > be quite safe.

> > Secondly, don't feed animal protein to other animals.  Feed sheep and
> cattle
> > foodstuffs made from plant material or animal fat.  This is something
that
> > Governments can do (and for the most part already have done) at a
> > legislative level.

> > In Australia, we are quite lucky as we introduced laws which prohibited
> the
> > feeding of animal protein to cloven hoofed animals more than 30 years
ago
> as
> > a protection against the introduction of Foot and Mouth disease.  It is
a
> > major offense to feed swill to pigs in Australia!  This probably saved
us
> > from getting BSE.

> > In Summary, if you and your government follow 2 simple rules, you will
be
> > ok.

> > Cheers!

> > Dave Beggs
> > (or should I be calling myself adsd9s87!?)



> > > Hi all,

> > > As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad cow
> > > (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
> > > outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> > > information<g>

> > > The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to Mad
> > > Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to what
> > > is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> > > From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
> > > America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
> > > to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular structures,
> > > and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> > > infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related to
> > > the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and toughest
> > > viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
> > > boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
> > > in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>  BSE
> > > is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used in
> > > meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> > > CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths in
> > > a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> > > people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
> > > years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> > > hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> > > The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected meat/brain
> > > are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular CJD
> > > from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
> > > the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> > > nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> > > Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat processing
> > > plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
> > > which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> > > hamburgers and other processed food.

> > > For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest going
> > > to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> > > http://www.*-*-*.com/
> > > National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD Surveilance
> > > Unit web page also has lot of information at http://www.*-*-*.com/

> > > Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> > > Best regards,

> > > Arnr Baldvinsson
> > > Icetips Software
> > > San Antonio, Texas, USA
> > > www.icetips.com

> > > Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> > > http://www.*-*-*.com/



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 13:17:56 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
Or only eat kosher slaughtered animals.

Steve Parker

--------------------------------------------------
kb and download center at:
     www.par2.com
KB: http://www.par2.com/cws/c5launch.dll/FAQS/THEFAQS.exe.0
--------------------------------------------------

"The improbable, we do. The impossible takes a bit longer."


Quote:
> Jim
> _almost_ makes you want to be a vegan :-)
> Regards
> Randy



> > If the slaughtering process is not done carefully, brain and spinal cord
> > matter can contaminate meat.

> > Jim.



> > > Hi Arnor.
> > > As my primary job is as a Dairy Cattle Veterinarian I thought I might
> make
> > a
> > > comment here too.

> > > Whilst vCJD is indeed different to CJD, the difference is in what
> > scientests
> > > see when they analyse brains at post mortem and in how the disease is
> > > transmitted.  Both diseases look exactly the same clinically and are
> > > disastrous for those that get them.

> > > There are several related diseases - scrapie in sheep, kuru in man,
> > > Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy in mink), Chronic wasting disease of
> > Deer,
> > > and various others.

> > > The scary thing about these diseases is that they are the only known
> > > "infectious" diseases that contain no DNA or RNA.  They are made
> entirely
> > of
> > > protein, and are labeled "Prions" for Protein Infectious Organisms.
> They
> > > are almost indestructible.  Boiling temperature won't denature them I
> > can't
> > > really use the word Kill because they are not really a life form
> according
> > > to current definitions!

> > > They all seem to have preferences for different species - scrapie in
> sheep
> > > does not cause BSE in cattle.  At least that used to be the
conventional
> > > wisdom.  If you give scrapie to Minks, they get sick.  If you then
feed
> > > these Mink to cattle, they develop BSE!

> > > In my humble opinion, these TSE's (Transmissible Spongiform
> > > Encepholopathies) are the scariest disease I've ever heard of.

> > > The good news is that it should be very easy to control - at least
from
> > the
> > > point of view of Human Health.

> > > Firstly, Don't eat Brains or spinal chords.  The rest of the animal is
> > safe.
> > > Striated muscle meat (steaks, roasts, ground beef, etc.), fat, bone
and
> > milk
> > > are NOT infective, since these tissues do not contain the BSE- causing
> > > agent. This is something that as individuals we can all do and we will
> > then
> > > be quite safe.

> > > Secondly, don't feed animal protein to other animals.  Feed sheep and
> > cattle
> > > foodstuffs made from plant material or animal fat.  This is something
> that
> > > Governments can do (and for the most part already have done) at a
> > > legislative level.

> > > In Australia, we are quite lucky as we introduced laws which
prohibited
> > the
> > > feeding of animal protein to cloven hoofed animals more than 30 years
> ago
> > as
> > > a protection against the introduction of Foot and Mouth disease.  It
is
> a
> > > major offense to feed swill to pigs in Australia!  This probably saved
> us
> > > from getting BSE.

> > > In Summary, if you and your government follow 2 simple rules, you will
> be
> > > ok.

> > > Cheers!

> > > Dave Beggs
> > > (or should I be calling myself adsd9s87!?)



> > > > Hi all,

> > > > As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad
cow
> > > > (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the BSE
> > > > outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> > > > information<g>

> > > > The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to
Mad
> > > > Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to
what
> > > > is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> > > > From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and North
> > > > America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_ related
> > > > to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular
structures,
> > > > and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> > > > infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related
to
> > > > the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and
toughest
> > > > viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours of
> > > > boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a host
> > > > in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>
BSE
> > > > is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were used
in
> > > > meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> > > > CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths
in
> > > > a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> > > > people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death 29
> > > > years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> > > > hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> > > > The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected
meat/brain
> > > > are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular
CJD
> > > > from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances of
> > > > the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> > > > nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> > > > Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat
processing
> > > > plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut it
> > > > which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> > > > hamburgers and other processed food.

> > > > For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest
going
> > > > to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> > > > http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/cjd.htm which is at the
> > > > National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD
Surveilance
> > > > Unit web page also has lot of information at

http://www.cjd.ed.ac.uk/

- Show quoted text -

Quote:

> > > > Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> > > > Best regards,

> > > > Arnr Baldvinsson
> > > > Icetips Software
> > > > San Antonio, Texas, USA
> > > > www.icetips.com

> > > > Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> > > > http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 20:25:23 GMT  
 OFF Topic: Mad Cow disease
Steve,
I'll bite :-)
What's the difference between kosher and non-kosher slaughter process?
Regards
Randy


Quote:
> Or only eat kosher slaughtered animals.

> Steve Parker

> --------------------------------------------------
> kb and download center at:
>      www.par2.com
> KB: http://www.par2.com/cws/c5launch.dll/FAQS/THEFAQS.exe.0
> --------------------------------------------------

> "The improbable, we do. The impossible takes a bit longer."



> > Jim
> > _almost_ makes you want to be a vegan :-)
> > Regards
> > Randy



> > > If the slaughtering process is not done carefully, brain and spinal
cord
> > > matter can contaminate meat.

> > > Jim.



> > > > Hi Arnor.
> > > > As my primary job is as a Dairy Cattle Veterinarian I thought I
might
> > make
> > > a
> > > > comment here too.

> > > > Whilst vCJD is indeed different to CJD, the difference is in what
> > > scientests
> > > > see when they analyse brains at post mortem and in how the disease
is
> > > > transmitted.  Both diseases look exactly the same clinically and are
> > > > disastrous for those that get them.

> > > > There are several related diseases - scrapie in sheep, kuru in man,
> > > > Transmissible Mink Encephalopathy in mink), Chronic wasting disease
of
> > > Deer,
> > > > and various others.

> > > > The scary thing about these diseases is that they are the only known
> > > > "infectious" diseases that contain no DNA or RNA.  They are made
> > entirely
> > > of
> > > > protein, and are labeled "Prions" for Protein Infectious Organisms.
> > They
> > > > are almost indestructible.  Boiling temperature won't denature them
I
> > > can't
> > > > really use the word Kill because they are not really a life form
> > according
> > > > to current definitions!

> > > > They all seem to have preferences for different species - scrapie in
> > sheep
> > > > does not cause BSE in cattle.  At least that used to be the
> conventional
> > > > wisdom.  If you give scrapie to Minks, they get sick.  If you then
> feed
> > > > these Mink to cattle, they develop BSE!

> > > > In my humble opinion, these TSE's (Transmissible Spongiform
> > > > Encepholopathies) are the scariest disease I've ever heard of.

> > > > The good news is that it should be very easy to control - at least
> from
> > > the
> > > > point of view of Human Health.

> > > > Firstly, Don't eat Brains or spinal chords.  The rest of the animal
is
> > > safe.
> > > > Striated muscle meat (steaks, roasts, ground beef, etc.), fat, bone
> and
> > > milk
> > > > are NOT infective, since these tissues do not contain the BSE-
causing
> > > > agent. This is something that as individuals we can all do and we
will
> > > then
> > > > be quite safe.

> > > > Secondly, don't feed animal protein to other animals.  Feed sheep
and
> > > cattle
> > > > foodstuffs made from plant material or animal fat.  This is
something
> > that
> > > > Governments can do (and for the most part already have done) at a
> > > > legislative level.

> > > > In Australia, we are quite lucky as we introduced laws which
> prohibited
> > > the
> > > > feeding of animal protein to cloven hoofed animals more than 30
years
> > ago
> > > as
> > > > a protection against the introduction of Foot and Mouth disease.  It
> is
> > a
> > > > major offense to feed swill to pigs in Australia!  This probably
saved
> > us
> > > > from getting BSE.

> > > > In Summary, if you and your government follow 2 simple rules, you
will
> > be
> > > > ok.

> > > > Cheers!

> > > > Dave Beggs
> > > > (or should I be calling myself adsd9s87!?)



> > > > > Hi all,

> > > > > As the media is getting full of the usual "information" about mad
> cow
> > > > > (BSE) disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) because of the
BSE

> > > > > outbreak in Canada, I thought I'd post here a little bit of _real
> > > > > information<g>

> > > > > The media is full of discussion about the CJD as being related to
> Mad
> > > > > Cow disease.  That is actually not quite true.  BSE is related to
> what
> > > > > is called a Variant CJD (vCJD), which is a different form of CJD.
> > > > > From 1995 to 2002 there were less than 135 cases in Europe and
North
> > > > > America of this very, very rare disease, which is _probably_
related
> > > > > to BSE.  They are caused by viruses with similar molecular
> structures,
> > > > > and it has been strongly suggested by medical research that BSE
> > > > > infected meat and brains can cause vCJD in humans.  BSE is related
> to
> > > > > the scrapies virus in sheep which is one of the smallest and
> toughest
> > > > > viruses around.  The scrapies virus is known to tolerate 3 hours
of
> > > > > boiling and is suspected to be able to live for years without a
host
> > > > > in rather hostile natural environments like we have in Iceland<g>
> BSE
> > > > > is thought to have come from scrapies infected sheep that were
used
> in
> > > > > meat-bone meal used to feed cows in Britain in the eighties.

> > > > > CJD is a brain disease with 100% fatality rate with about 1 deaths
> in
> > > > > a million people pr. year in the US.  CJD usually targets older
> > > > > people.  vCJD targets younger people and the average age at death
29
> > > > > years.  In the US, the death rate in <30 from CJD is about 1 in a
> > > > > hundred million people or about 2-3 cases pr. year.

> > > > > The chances of getting infected by vCJD from a BSE infected
> meat/brain
> > > > > are very, very small.  The changes of getting infected by regular
> CJD
> > > > > from a BSE infected meat/brain are absolutely NONE.  The chances
of
> > > > > the virus being infected by meat are much much smaller than by
> > > > > nervesystem material such as nerves, spinal cord or brain tissue.
> > > > > Once the connection was made between BSE and vCJD the meat
> processing
> > > > > plants slowly started to change the way they handle meat and cut
it
> > > > > which has reduced a lot the amount of nerves in the meat used in
> > > > > hamburgers and other processed food.

> > > > > For some real information about these diseases, I would suggest
> going
> > > > > to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website at
> > > > > http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/cjd/cjd.htm which is at the
> > > > > National Center for Infectious Diseases.  The British CJD
> Surveilance
> > > > > Unit web page also has lot of information at
> http://www.cjd.ed.ac.uk/

> > > > > Thought prehaps someone would be interested:)

> > > > > Best regards,

> > > > > Arnr Baldvinsson
> > > > > Icetips Software
> > > > > San Antonio, Texas, USA
> > > > > www.icetips.com

> > > > > Subscribe to information from Icetips.com:
> > > > > http://www.icetips.com/getnotificationinfo.htm



Thu, 10 Nov 2005 20:57:04 GMT  
 
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