The best source 
Author Message
 The best source

What is the best book to get on learning c/c++.  I'm intersted in learning
the language :)

mikee

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Tue, 16 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source
c/c++ is not a language.  C is a language.  C++ is a language.  They are not
the same thing.

That said, I learned C from Kernighan and Ritchie's The C Programming
Language 2nd Edition.  Other people prefer the more wordy Deitel and Deitel
Guide to Programming C.  Still others prefer a variety of different books.
Look around Amazon or a bookstore and read some reviews.

If you want to learn C++, there is nowhere better than teh source.  Look for
Bjarne Stroustrup's book on C++.


Quote:
> What is the best book to get on learning c/c++.  I'm intersted in learning
> the language :)

> mikee

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> Posted via CNET Help.com
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Tue, 16 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source

comp.lang.c:

Quote:
> What is the best book to get on learning c/c++.  I'm intersted in learning
> the language :)

> mikee

You can't, because there is no language named "c/c++".  They are two
different languages with much in common but growing farther apart with
time.  So the very first step is to decide which language you want to
learn first and concentrate on it.  Afterwards you can decide whether
or not you want to learn the other one.

If you decide you want to learn C first, the best introductory
tutorial book I know of is:

C Programming: A Modern Approach
K. N. King
W. W. Norton & Company 1996
Softcover ISBN 0393969452

If you are interested in learning C++ I am not that familiar with

(or read their FAQ) for the best advice on C++ books.

There are also reviews of some 2000 books on C, C++, and some Java on
the web site of ACCU, the Association of C and C++ Users.  Here's the
link:  http://www.accu.org/

FAQ for comp.lang.c
http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html

FAQ for comp.lang.c++
http://www.cerfnet.com/~mpcline/c++-faq-lite/

FAQ for alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++
http://www.raos.demon.co.uk/acllc-c++/faq.html

Jack Klein
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Tue, 16 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source
I would say using books by Herbert Schildt from Osborne book series does help
a lot. Maybe you should get the "From Ground Up version" :)

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Tue, 16 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source

Quote:

>c/c++ is not a language.  C is a language.  C++ is a language.  They are
not
>the same thing.

While it's true that C and C++ are distinct languages, it would be my
recommendation that one have a firm grounding in C before learning
C++.  So, "learning C/C++" is not a bad way of putting it.

I agree that the Kernighan and Ritchie book is a good place to start
on your road to C and then C++.

-Jordan Henderson

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Tue, 16 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source

Quote:
> What is the best book to get on learning c/c++.  I'm intersted in
learning
> the language :)

I have always like the Wait Groups C Primer Plus (as a C
Learner/Reference (but no C++ at all)).  The thing I like about it the
most is that it is well worded for new learners, and it doesn't lie
about the language (most Learning books tell you inaccurate or down
right wrong things about C in an attempt to keep it simple).

my 2 cents
Jeff

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Tue, 16 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source
The book that I have used the most in my "studies" of C is Jasma's C/C++
Programmer's Bible.  It has gotten me through many a last minute project.

-Kevin

Quote:


> comp.lang.c:

> > What is the best book to get on learning c/c++.  I'm intersted in learning
> > the language :)

> > mikee

> You can't, because there is no language named "c/c++".  They are two
> different languages with much in common but growing farther apart with
> time.  So the very first step is to decide which language you want to
> learn first and concentrate on it.  Afterwards you can decide whether
> or not you want to learn the other one.

> If you decide you want to learn C first, the best introductory
> tutorial book I know of is:

> C Programming: A Modern Approach
> K. N. King
> W. W. Norton & Company 1996
> Softcover ISBN 0393969452

> If you are interested in learning C++ I am not that familiar with

> (or read their FAQ) for the best advice on C++ books.

> There are also reviews of some 2000 books on C, C++, and some Java on
> the web site of ACCU, the Association of C and C++ Users.  Here's the
> link:  http://www.accu.org/

> FAQ for comp.lang.c
> http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html

> FAQ for comp.lang.c++
> http://www.cerfnet.com/~mpcline/c++-faq-lite/

> FAQ for alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++
> http://www.raos.demon.co.uk/acllc-c++/faq.html

> Jack Klein
> --
> Home: http://jackklein.home.att.net
> --


--



Tue, 16 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source

Quote:

> I have always like the Wait Groups C Primer Plus (as a C
> Learner/Reference (but no C++ at all)).  The thing I like about it the
> most is that [...] it doesn't lie
> about the language (most Learning books tell you inaccurate or down
> right wrong things about C in an attempt to keep it simple).

Actually, I think that "technique of deliberate lying," as Knuth calls
it, can be very effective. Have you ever attended a physics class? Did
it start with Newtonian physics, or did it tell you how things really
are right away?

Gergo

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nature are constantly broken for their sakes."
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GU d- s:+ a--- C++>$ UL+++ P>++ L+++ E>++ W+ N++ o? K- w--- !O !M !V
PS+ PE+ Y+ PGP+ t* 5+ X- R>+ tv++ b+>+++ DI+ D+ G>++ e* h! !r !y+
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Wed, 17 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source

Quote:

>I would say using books by Herbert Schildt from Osborne book series does help

                                                                          ^^^^

Quote:
>a lot. Maybe you should get the "From Ground Up version" :)

I think you meant a different word here.  "hinder" would fit well.

John
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John Winters.  Wallingford, Oxon, England.

The Linux Emporium - a source for Linux CDs in the UK
See http://www.linuxemporium.co.uk/
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Fri, 19 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source


Quote:

>> I have always like the Wait Groups C Primer Plus (as a C
>> Learner/Reference (but no C++ at all)).  The thing I like about it the
>> most is that [...] it doesn't lie
>> about the language (most Learning books tell you inaccurate or down
>> right wrong things about C in an attempt to keep it simple).

>Actually, I think that "technique of deliberate lying," as Knuth calls
>it, can be very effective. Have you ever attended a physics class? Did
>it start with Newtonian physics, or did it tell you how things really
>are right away?

To the best of my knowledge physicists still *don't know* how things
"really are". Physics is in the business of creating predictive models
of the nature of the Universe. These models are not exact (although
physicists have a pipe-dream to create an exact model), a model is
useful if it makes predictions within adequate tolerances. A simpler
model that achieves that aim i superior for this purpose. At school
I found a good deal of physics problem solving involved determining
the right simplifications and approximations in order to make a
problem tractable while remaining reasonably accurate.

Applying this principle to something as exact as a technical language
specification is at the very least questionable. In the case of
Newtonian mechanics, relativity (special and general), quantum mechanics
and so on you have a number of distinct theories that you can comare
and contrast. That's entirely different to stating wrong facts about
one particular theory which would be like stating incorrect information
about C.

The trick when writing a beginner's book about C (or probably
anything) is to keep things simple *without* lying. That's not easy
and somebody who can do that is probably a very special writer.

--
-----------------------------------------


-----------------------------------------
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Fri, 19 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source

Quote:

> I would say using books by Herbert Schildt from Osborne book series does help
> a lot. Maybe you should get the "From Ground Up version" :)

Some people tend to say that the best books by Herbert Schildt are six feet down
from goround level :-) Be aware that the common opinion among more seasoned C
users is that HS makes a lot of mistakes, many of which are hard to detect by
learners. His popularity his based in the fact that he writes clear and concise.
Unfortunately, that doesn't make it right. If you're interested in professional
C programming, you'll have to "unlearn" quite a bit of what he calls C.

Better books have beeen suggested in this thread, I'm not going to add to that.

Michiel Salters
--



Fri, 19 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source
Quote:


>> The thing I like about it the
>> most is that [...] it doesn't lie
>> about the language (most Learning books tell you inaccurate or down
>> right wrong things about C in an attempt to keep it simple).

>Actually, I think that "technique of deliberate lying," as Knuth calls
>it, can be very effective. Have you ever attended a physics class? Did
>it start with Newtonian physics, or did it tell you how things really
>are right away?

Ah but unlike C, things still work despite my ignorance.
C.
--



Fri, 19 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source

Quote:

>Actually, I think that "technique of deliberate lying," as Knuth calls
>it, can be very effective. Have you ever attended a physics class? Did
>it start with Newtonian physics, or did it tell you how things really
>are right away?

I don't mind as long as they say clearly that it's a simplification.  I do
mind if they don't warn you that they're giving a simplified picture.

-s
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Will work for interesting hardware.  http://www.plethora.net/~seebs/
Visit my new ISP <URL:http://www.plethora.net/> --- More Net, Less Spam!
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Fri, 19 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source

Quote:

>I would say using books by Herbert Schildt from Osborne book series does help
>a lot. Maybe you should get the "From Ground Up version" :)

     Books by S*hi**t should be ground up.

Sincerely,

Gene Wirchenko

Computerese Irregular Verb Conjugation:
     I have preferences.
     You have biases.
     He/She has prejudices.
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Fri, 19 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 The best source

I know many very knowledgeable people who are usually very
conservative and not prone to outbursts who not only say one should
not use Herbert Schildts books but actually suggest burning them!

This is due to the errors in them. They may be easy to read but are
apparently wrong!

I know one member of the ISO C committee who, when asked about
Schildts books pulls out the annotated C reference and invites people to
call out page numbers. He has, so far, never failed to find an error on
any page (of the annotations not the standard).

I believe that there are comments on Schildts in the FAQ for this NG.


Quote:
>I would say using books by Herbert Schildt from Osborne book series does
>help
>a lot. Maybe you should get the "From Ground Up version" :)

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Fri, 19 Apr 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
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