Am I ready for a VB Job. 
Author Message
 Am I ready for a VB Job.

Hey, I would like to get a job doing databases or something like that
for a company. Here are my skills.
3 months of hard core studing and experementing with Visual Basic 5
writing programs that us the winsock control and the DAO control.(My on
personal prjects taking about 3 - 5 hours of my day)
For my current company I wrote a small Access applications to keep track
of employee hours and I recently finished a nice report detailing the
weekly billing hours per employee (This was my first time with reports
and found it confusing) I also wrote a a database to keep track of
serial numbers for a project we are doing which can do some neat things
like subreports and reading data from Excel sheets. These were side
projects and not my main tasks. Most of what I know of Access I learned
through reading several books and these two apllications I mentiond.My
VB / VBA skills are really good though I havn't worked much with classes
yet. My SQL skills are slowly groing. I haven;t worked with SQL Server (
though I have ordered the eval version to learn from.) And I'm just now
getting around to ASP. Are there any entry level positions that are
suitable for this level of knowledge or should I wait till I at least
learn SQL server and maybe ASP before I hit the market for jobs. Thanks
for any guidence.


Fri, 20 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Am I ready for a VB Job.

It's true that you would be much more 'marketable' with some SQL and ASP
experience. I've been out of the professional programming loop for some time
now - (dabble on the side) - but if you hunt around some smaller companies
might be willing to take on a junior programmer and be willing to educate
you (this is a good thing when you look at some of the course prices).
Companies are scarfing up anybody showing any kind of internet programming
skills/interest.  Alot of smaller ones are willing to take the risk of
developing personell (especially if they are not geared towards providing
ISP services).

I've yet be asked to show any of my degrees, or any of my certifications.  I
HAVE been asked to explain in detail the projects I've built - size, scope,
tools, etc.
So hey - the worst anyone can do to you is say 'no' - on a good day - you
might find a good oportunity - so give it a shot.



Sat, 21 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Am I ready for a VB Job.

Quote:
> I've yet be asked to show any of my degrees, or any of my
certifications.  I
> HAVE been asked to explain in detail the projects I've built - size,
scope,
> tools, etc.
> So hey - the worst anyone can do to you is say 'no' - on a good day - you
> might find a good oportunity - so give it a shot.

Yes. It is exactly what happened to me.
I have degrees, experience, projects, but not certifications, and I
said what I can do in the interviews, more than the job descriptions
the company posted on the media.
I am still waiting for a 'good day'.
IT personnels nowadays are so plenty that we become unwanted commodity.

--
Posted via CNET Help.com
http://www.help.com/



Sat, 21 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Am I ready for a VB Job.

Quote:

> > I've yet be asked to show any of my degrees, or any of my
> certifications.  I
> > HAVE been asked to explain in detail the projects I've built - size,
> scope,
> > tools, etc.
> > So hey - the worst anyone can do to you is say 'no' - on a good day - you
> > might find a good oportunity - so give it a shot.

> Yes. It is exactly what happened to me.
> I have degrees, experience, projects, but not certifications, and I
> said what I can do in the interviews, more than the job descriptions
> the company posted on the media.
> I am still waiting for a 'good day'.
> IT personnels nowadays are so plenty that we become unwanted commodity.

> --
> Posted via CNET Help.com
> http://www.help.com/

I've been a computer technician for about 15 years.
When I moved from one state to another one, I found
that comptechs were a dime a dozen here.
If you don't have a paper that says you're certified
9 times out of 10, you'll get a polite smile and
a hand showing you the door, and a message saying
don't call us, we'll call you.
It is a catch 22 situation. If you're a book-learned
comptech, programmer, whatever, no matter how
much you know, (school taught, whatever)
you still have no WORK experience.
How do you get the work experience if no one will
hire you to work? There's the catch-22
Best bet is to get the mark of the beast and go for
your MCSE. It will at least make you more marketable.
.
--Deeply Shrouded & Quiet
--Central Control D-Dial #49


Mon, 23 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Am I ready for a VB Job.
I have the opposite problem. I have been programming computers for 25 years.
When I started in the industry, there was no such thing as an IT degree.
Over the last few years, I have has so much trouble getting work, that now I
am taking a couple of years off and doing full-time study to get that "piece
of paper." At least I know when I'm finished, I will have the experience AND
the piece of paper to back me up. And with my experience behind me, I am
breezing through the course, and even getting a few credits for prior
learning.

Regards,

Mick.



Quote:

> > > I've yet be asked to show any of my degrees, or any of my
> > certifications.  I
> > > HAVE been asked to explain in detail the projects I've built - size,
> > scope,
> > > tools, etc.
> > > So hey - the worst anyone can do to you is say 'no' - on a good day -
you
> > > might find a good oportunity - so give it a shot.

> > Yes. It is exactly what happened to me.
> > I have degrees, experience, projects, but not certifications, and I
> > said what I can do in the interviews, more than the job descriptions
> > the company posted on the media.
> > I am still waiting for a 'good day'.
> > IT personnels nowadays are so plenty that we become unwanted commodity.

> > --
> > Posted via CNET Help.com
> > http://www.help.com/

> I've been a computer technician for about 15 years.
> When I moved from one state to another one, I found
> that comptechs were a dime a dozen here.
> If you don't have a paper that says you're certified
> 9 times out of 10, you'll get a polite smile and
> a hand showing you the door, and a message saying
> don't call us, we'll call you.
> It is a catch 22 situation. If you're a book-learned
> comptech, programmer, whatever, no matter how
> much you know, (school taught, whatever)
> you still have no WORK experience.
> How do you get the work experience if no one will
> hire you to work? There's the catch-22
> Best bet is to get the mark of the beast and go for
> your MCSE. It will at least make you more marketable.
> .
> --Deeply Shrouded & Quiet
> --Central Control D-Dial #49



Mon, 23 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Am I ready for a VB Job.
i think needing certification depends on where you live and the type of
company you are trying to get hired at. in NW USA (well Portland at least)
certification seems pretty important to big companies and consulting firms.
that may be becuase M$ isnt that far away and Intel has 4 plants in the
city. i dont remember certification being such a big deal on the east coast
(not necessarily all of the east coast, but {*filter*}ia anyway) as long as you
had some experience or at least some idea of what you were doing and were
prepared to learn. but certification does help. it means you have proof that
you know what your doing working with certain platforms and software tools,
etc.

Mr. X


Quote:
> I have the opposite problem. I have been programming computers for 25
years.
> When I started in the industry, there was no such thing as an IT degree.
> Over the last few years, I have has so much trouble getting work, that now
I
> am taking a couple of years off and doing full-time study to get that
"piece
> of paper." At least I know when I'm finished, I will have the experience
AND
> the piece of paper to back me up. And with my experience behind me, I am
> breezing through the course, and even getting a few credits for prior
> learning.

> Regards,

> Mick.




> > > > I've yet be asked to show any of my degrees, or any of my
> > > certifications.  I
> > > > HAVE been asked to explain in detail the projects I've built - size,
> > > scope,
> > > > tools, etc.
> > > > So hey - the worst anyone can do to you is say 'no' - on a good
day -
> you
> > > > might find a good oportunity - so give it a shot.

> > > Yes. It is exactly what happened to me.
> > > I have degrees, experience, projects, but not certifications, and I
> > > said what I can do in the interviews, more than the job descriptions
> > > the company posted on the media.
> > > I am still waiting for a 'good day'.
> > > IT personnels nowadays are so plenty that we become unwanted
commodity.

> > > --
> > > Posted via CNET Help.com
> > > http://www.*-*-*.com/

> > I've been a computer technician for about 15 years.
> > When I moved from one state to another one, I found
> > that comptechs were a dime a dozen here.
> > If you don't have a paper that says you're certified
> > 9 times out of 10, you'll get a polite smile and
> > a hand showing you the door, and a message saying
> > don't call us, we'll call you.
> > It is a catch 22 situation. If you're a book-learned
> > comptech, programmer, whatever, no matter how
> > much you know, (school taught, whatever)
> > you still have no WORK experience.
> > How do you get the work experience if no one will
> > hire you to work? There's the catch-22
> > Best bet is to get the mark of the beast and go for
> > your MCSE. It will at least make you more marketable.
> > .
> > --Deeply Shrouded & Quiet
> > --Central Control D-Dial #49



Tue, 24 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Am I ready for a VB Job.

Quote:

> I've been a computer technician for about 15 years.
> When I moved from one state to another one, I found
> that comptechs were a dime a dozen here.
> If you don't have a paper that says you're certified
> 9 times out of 10, you'll get a polite smile and
> a hand showing you the door, and a message saying
> don't call us, we'll call you.
> It is a catch 22 situation. If you're a book-learned
> comptech, programmer, whatever, no matter how
> much you know, (school taught, whatever)
> you still have no WORK experience.
> How do you get the work experience if no one will
> hire you to work? There's the catch-22
> Best bet is to get the mark of the beast and go for
> your MCSE. It will at least make you more marketable.

Regrettably, I must disagree with the very last statement this poster makes:  I
recent colleague of mine was searching for a new job, with both an MCSE and an
MCSD.  They wanted to know two things:  did he have a degree and did he have an
MCSD.  Nothing else.  They couldn't have given two rat's asses for his MCSE.  I
don't know if you have paid attention to the statistics or not, but last I read
there were 200,000 MCSE's, and only 20,000 MCSD's in this country.  That makes
an MCSD inherantly more valuable, and if you follow the trends in salary, you
will notice that this trend is borne out.  See the MCP Journal magazine article
on salaries for MCSD's.  It's ASTOUNDING how much more they make than MCSE's.
Like 10K more, on average.  Amazing.

--
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Wed, 25 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Am I ready for a VB Job.

Quote:

> i think needing certification depends on where you live and the type of
> company you are trying to get hired at. in NW USA (well Portland at least)

Regrettably, again, I must disagree:  certification, at least in Microsoft
technologies, means pretty much EVERYTHING to employers, at least in this area.
So, that would make at least two areas of the country that are governed by
microsoft certifiction, the Northwest and the Midwest.  I happen to have it on
good understanding that the east coast is also in desperate need of MCSD's, so
that's another area, and if all of those areas of the country are in need, it
would make sense that the rest of the country is in desperate need as well.  We
are in the highest growth sector of the market in the WORLD, ladies and
gentlemen.  We should consider ourselves lucky.  But even if we don't, we should
still remember that people on the outside consider microsoft certification to be
tantamount to godlike status.

Quote:
> prepared to learn. but certification does help. it means you have proof that
> you know what your doing working with certain platforms and software tools,

And that is the most important part of your education.  Yeah, your ass-wiping
diploma(no offense) will help(I have an asswiping diploma myself! *grin*), but
when it comes to actual experience, the MCP, MCSD and MCSE will help you so much
more, it's not even funny.  Ours is a very odd category of work where you don't
need a degree to prove your ability.  Take advantage of this fact.

--
 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Jeff Goslin - Monument | "Oh Bentson, you are so mercifully free from the  |

 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   how come everyone elses religion is a cult but your cult is a religion   |
 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
|      XGenetic, the ActiveX Artificial Intelligence Genetic Algorithm       |
|           http://www.winsite.com/info/pc/win95/demo/xgen-sw.zip/           |
 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------



Wed, 25 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Am I ready for a VB Job.
Quote:
> Regrettably, I must disagree with the very last statement this poster
makes:  I
> recent colleague of mine was searching for a new job, with both an MCSE
and an
> MCSD.  They wanted to know two things:  did he have a degree and did he
have an
> MCSD.  Nothing else.  They couldn't have given two rat's asses for his

MCSE.

thats probably because MCSE and MCSD are 2 different areas of developement.
SE is Systems Engineer (networks), and SD is Software Developement.

Mr. X



Wed, 25 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 Am I ready for a VB Job.
hi,

i am quite new with visual basic ,but as i try learning
more, i need someone to give me some things to do with my
programs.i did develop one lousy ado database program for
my mother ,but now i don't know wht to do anymore.if you(or
anybody else) have the time and will to send me the tasks
of your programs,maybe i can learn from that

thanks anyway,

vlad craciunescu,

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Sat, 28 Sep 2002 03:00:00 GMT  
 
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